Aluminium mast finishing

Discussion in 'Materials' started by Fanie, Nov 16, 2008.

  1. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Fanie Fanie

    I have an aluminium mast that I got from someone for a couple of bucks. It was lying out in the back yard in wind and weather for years. It's got a few scratches and bruises, but nothing serious and there are no dents or damages other than the one tip that looks like someone sawed a piece off it. I assume it was an 8m mast, but now it's about 7m500.

    I started cleaning the mast, it's very dirty. There doesn't seem to be any anodizing or anything else on the mast to protect it. Is that normally how mast are used or what is used as a finish for it ?

    I would think that some anodizing could give it new life, and what about having it hard anodized ? Could get it a nice colour then too.
     

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  2. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Fanie, sand the little sucker down with 180 then prime with PA10 (International), overcoat with two pack primer/surfacer sand back smooth then spray with automotive two pack of your choice, that will be a suitable protective cover as well as cheap because you can do it all yourself in a few days.
     
  3. Fanie
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    Fanie Fanie

    Is it a standard to alu paint masts like that, or do they sometimes anodise / hard anodise them ?

    How well is that paint going to live with the mast bending ?... or do one paint after each trip :D
     
  4. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    No , normally alloy masts are anodised.
    The mast does not bend anywhere near enough to crack paint
     
  5. simon
    Joined: May 2002
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    simon Senior Member

    Someone told me that they use Penetrol Aluminium on masts and just rub it on. This would make life very easy. I do not know anything about the preparation. I have tried to contact Flood Australia for that matter. I have not got a real answer yet, but will try again. I would like to use it on an aluminium hull.

    Homepage:
    http://www.floodaustralia.net/

    Simon
     
  6. aprilpaxton
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    aprilpaxton Junior Member

    paint is the only alternative if you plan to do it by yourself.. See a marine store that has prep/marine primer for aluminum and good quality marine paint.. But avoid those paint with copper..
     
  7. mattotoole
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    mattotoole Senior Member

    Unless you know someone in the anodizing business, getting one-off parts done, especially large ones, can be very expensive. So as the others have said, paint it if you're looking for a long-term solution. If you don't mind going over it once a year, polishing/sealing can be a good solution too, and much cheaper in terms of material cost (no accounting for your time though). Any aluminum polish from a marine or auto parts store is fine.
     
  8. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

  9. BOATDOCKTOR
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    BOATDOCKTOR John

    Boatdocktor

    Fanie,
    One thing to keep in mind, if the mast has metal inserts, eyelets, fasteners, pullys, etc. more than likely they are made of a dissimiliar metal. If that is the case you may want to consider uing an acid etch type primer first. This type of chemistry neutralizes the contact between dissimiliar metals so that electrolysis won't occur. Maybe you've seen this before. It appears to be a white powder in and around the contacts of dissimiliar metals and is quite commonly found on masts. Paint will not stick to areas that are not properly clean, sanded and etched.
    Hope that helps rather than confuses.
    John
     
  10. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Duralac, anticorrosive primer/sealant, excellent product for those dissimilar metals
     
  11. divinesd
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    divinesd Divine service & design

    I go with Landlubber. Gives the best result.
    Cheers
     
  12. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    no point anodising it.
    It has its own oxide layer which is plenty good enough against corrosion.

    Just before what you attach to it, that's all...
     
  13. sabahcat
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    sabahcat Senior Member

    You do realise Duralac is bright yellow and not something to coat a mast with.

    Good for rivets and bolt separation, but thats it.
     

  14. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    Duralac is a jointing paste
     
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