Aluminium Boat Design & Building

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by profix, Sep 28, 2004.

  1. profix
    Joined: Sep 2004
    Posts: 6
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    Location: England

    profix Junior Member

    Dear All,

    I am looking for information with regards to the design, and detail drawings, In AutoCAD format, either .dwg or. dfx

    For 16 to 22 foot aluminium boat design, similar to boston whaler designs, centre console type layout.

    I am conversant with autuCAD, and have TIG welding experience, but am looking for designs with cutting schedules that could be profled by CNC machines to allow for ease of assembly.

    Anyone out there who can point me in the right direction ??

    Many Thanks

    Karl :?: :)
     
  2. Alan Gluyas
    Joined: Oct 2004
    Posts: 8
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    Location: Western Australia

    Alan Gluyas Designer / Surveyor

    Alloy boat plans & kits

    Karl

    There are several designers in Australia that offer plans or plasma cut kits for small vessels. These normally cost a couple of thousand Australian dollars more than you could buy the alloy plate for, but they are often well researched and designed kits. They are normally complete with all alloy needed and can include alloy windows pre-made if required. The alloy pieces may need a small amount of presswork for bends. Because of the shrinkage rate of alloy during welding, anything that can be bent rather than welded should be taken advantage of.

    Phil Curran of CDM Marine and Gavin Mair are two of the top alloy designers here on the west coast and they have websites.

    I have a 28 foot trailerable boat in alloy suitable for experienced builders but it is not a kit boat.
     
  3. CWA
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: AUSTRALIA

    CWA Junior Member

    do you have plans for your boat i have 25 years exp in fabrication and are looking for some plans
     
  4. Alan Gluyas
    Joined: Oct 2004
    Posts: 8
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    Location: Western Australia

    Alan Gluyas Designer / Surveyor

    Alloy boat design

    CWA

    I have the original design for the prototype available but I am reworking the underwater lines for a stern drive leg (there needs to be more displacement aft for the change of LCB), which also affects the performance potential for the boat. The current vessel has a 70 hp inboard diesel and has a top speed of arounf 15 knots with a cruise of 20 to 14 kts. This is at a displacement of 2700 kg.

    The second generation hull will have a 120 hp diesel stern drive (although a four stroke outboard is possible) and will have a top speed of 20 to 22 kts and a cruise of 18 to 20. I have not built the second generation hull yet, so I have only the developed frame sections, which do not always match the shape you get in the real world. I will do a plasma cutting schedule for the prototype but the frame sections will have a trimming allowance.

    After I have built the prototype I will use the corrected sections to put together a plasma cut kit.

    If you are still interested I can send you more detail. If you are in this part of Australia you can come and look at the prototype, which has been in the water for 12 months.
     

    Attached Files:

  5. surplusdoctor
    Joined: Dec 2004
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    Location: Dearborn, Michigan U.S.A.

    surplusdoctor New Member

    Aluminum Hull Houseboat.

    I have a surplus of Aluminum Diamond plate that was salvaged. Actually it looks as new. I was thinking I might be able to build a house boat hull out of it. Who can direct me to a directory of house boat plans I could make a selection from? Dave surplusdoctor@comcast.net
     
  6. Alan Gluyas
    Joined: Oct 2004
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    Location: Western Australia

    Alan Gluyas Designer / Surveyor

    Alloy plate for hull

    Yes, I can see it would be tempting to use surplus plate to build a hull, and if it is a marine grade alloy (5000 series) it may save you some dollars up front. Some of the 5000 series alloys are not as stiff as 5083, which is what is normally used for hull construction, and you would need to allow for that.

    I would not use a non-marine grade alloy if the boat were going near salt water.

    Overall, I think the hassle factor of building in tread plate would result in an inferior boat. The cost of the hull materials is a very small part of the overall price of any boat and any compromise you make in construction can seriously affect the value of the boat.
     
  7. surplusdoctor
    Joined: Dec 2004
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    Location: Dearborn, Michigan U.S.A.

    surplusdoctor New Member

    Regardless of materials, I'll still need to select a design & blueprints to construct from. Got any you can point me to? I'd like to look and make a selection. Thanks! Dave
     

  8. Tim_Hastie
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Canada

    Tim_Hastie Junior Member

    Tread plate can look really sharpe if done well. It is very hard to line up the patterns. Count on a lot of waste when useing it.

    Cheers
     
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