Alternative to marvelous Buccaneer 24

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Gary Baigent, Apr 18, 2010.

  1. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Actually it is the other way round Sam, foilers are really excellent in seaways because the foils hold them steady - conversely, in lighter winds, there is foil drag to accommodate. There are tricks to get around this though.That red Lombard Formula 40 above left competed in the 2002 Route du Rhum, which was hit by that famous savage storm that wrecked nearly the whole fleet .... but the f40, now called Fidou, but then called some long name, was one of only a few boats to make it through to the other side .... and it was smallest boat in fleet. Beating to windward Ker Marine, a 50 footer, once thrashed the whole fleet of much larger multihulls in a fresh air series - she had inverted Y foils and a deep dagger.
    I guess Scissoring Sid could be set up to be say, 25-50% open, then locked .... but there is that wing mast to consider ... I smell disaster. The amas would be weirdly out of main hull line ... maybe it could work but you could never move the boat - be like a scuttling crab.
     
  2. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Gary.
    How are you going to arrange the water tight seals under the rotating "Turret". :?:
     
  3. Pouakai
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    Pouakai Junior Member

    Unless you also had pivots at the ama/beam join - but getting to be a complicated system then.
     
  4. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Sealing the pivot base area? - all the solutions I've thought about seem pretty Mickey Mouse - maybe the simplest is the best; a skirt which is glued to the turret bottom, which is Velcro-ed to the main hull when beam is positioned open, with another skirt overlapping the first one to make a double seal.
     
  5. Paul B

    Paul B Previous Member

    If you are thinking that you might want to consider the inner skirt being glued to the hull and velcro attached to the turret (seal at the bottom), then the outer skirt would be glued to the turret and velcro at the hull (seal at the top).

    That should be fairly water resistant. However, in a "firehose reach" it might not stand up to the pressure.
     
  6. DarthCluin
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    DarthCluin Senior Member

    Is there access from the turret into the hull, or is the hull accessed separately?
     
  7. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Good one Paul, also if the hull base plate is slightly wider than the beam/cabin turret, then you only have to worry about water coming down from the top - my friend Jimmy Keogh just pointed that out. Of course water will do that .... but this would not be under such high pressure.
     
  8. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Darth, it would be a lot easier if the cabin/beam was an enclosed module with a mean bunk in those shallow confines ... but it would be too mean and too shallow for survival (I mean from asphyxiation and driving the occupant insane from claustrophobia) ... so the cabin will have to be open to the hull ... but there could also be a guillotine problem there one would also have to watch.
     
  9. captainsideburn
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    captainsideburn Junior Member

    Gary,
    You should set up a flickr sight or something. You seem to have an inexhaustable supply of amazing multihull pictures. keep them coming pls.
     
  10. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    Love your designs and the concept of a small float tri. Does the concept rely on lifting foils to compensate for lack of buoyancy? Could I build a 25 foot cruisng/racing tri (thinking farrier type accommodations) using nacra or tornado beach cat hulls (which would not have enough buoyancy) if I include foils? Is this a good or bad idea? And yes, please post up all of your amazing pics somewhere.
     
  11. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    hi Dennis, the foils are VERY important - otherwise the float would bury ... and you would end up looking momentarily at the sky, followed by rapidly approaching water surface, then enveloped in bubbles.
    If you break a foil, you have to round up and reef down fast.
    Nothing wrong with your idea of Nacra/Tornado amas, many have already done this.
     
  12. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

    Thanks, thats what I thought. I have seen the trinado designs, but the vaka has to be kept small because of the small beach cat floats. My idea was to use foils to get away with a larger vaka than on the usual trinado type designs. That way I could have more room in the vaka (say 25 foot). Is this viable, or am I dreaming?
     
  13. gypsy28
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    gypsy28 Senior Member

    Looks awesome, I want one
     
  14. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Just back from 4-5 days sailing solo in a mixture of superb autumn NZ light wind weather mixed in with squalls and thunderstorms to keep things in balance - thought you might be interested in these light weather shots.
     

    Attached Files:


  15. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Have drawn up the main, central bulkhead full size, only a metre total height including main beam (which has been increased in depth and chord) and cabin top. There will be two bulkheads there, 300mm apart, to make a compression box, one bulkhead for main beam and carrying the swiveling bearing, the other for the wing mast base. Although larger than the original skinny "C Class" Scissoring Sid is still a pretty small boat and accommodation will be coffin-like - but still enough to have a couple of narrow bunks. It is essentially an ultra-light day sailer. There will be the two main bulkheads, the bow and transom and two more intermediate ring frames. The shape of the main hull will be dictated by the two central bulkheads and the two ends, the gunwhales and the keelson; the bent plywood will essentially make the correct shape throughout the hull, then the intermediate ring frames and the bunk bases will go in and lock it all together. This boat will be very light but with a hard tensioned skin making it stiff, even before the laminates of glass and some carbon go on.
     

    Attached Files:

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