Alternative to marvelous Buccaneer 24

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Gary Baigent, Apr 18, 2010.

  1. captainsideburn
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    captainsideburn Junior Member

  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    ===========
    Hey,Captain: thanks for the NZ stuff-and you too Gary!
     
  3. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Gary. I sat for two hours reading your book that the Captain put up.
    I was staggered by the sheer volume of information therin and marvelled at the depth of research which you must have put into it.
    I hope you have it copyrighted. :cool:

    I was particularly moved by Jan Youngs comment regarding sailboats:-
    "Everyone wants sports cars, but invariably, once the real decision comes around, they end up with family saloons."

    HOW TRUE.

    Lock Crowther knew this and he set out, with his Buccaneer line of trimarans, to provide a "Family saloon" which could also have a good performance. In the event the Buccaneers turned out to be as good performers as the Krakens and the larger Krakens turned out to be great fast cruisers for smaller crews. So there was a blurring of the design uses.

    I had a B24 which I intended to race. But I found I used it more for for cruising than racing. But you are right, it was a marvelous boat. I subsequently had a B28 which we cruised extensively---but which turned out to be an exceptional racer, winning 21 out of 24 races over a two year period. That boat was fully equipped and stocked with food etc: so that we could sail at any time,which we often did after work, in the cool of the evening of a hot summers day.

    Happy Days. :D
     
  4. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Oldsailor, sailing can be okay sometimes, eh?
    Light Brigade has been updated since I posted here; keeps getting larger and probably close to the unwieldy stage. I sent the multihull section to Jim Brown's new site (he was interested to het Southern Antipodean history - which many in the US don't know about) and he found there was almost too much information - so only real sailing nutters can be bothered reading it.
    I self published it and sent copies to the designers and my friends - and sold a few copies too - but am chipping away at getting it published in larger numbers.
    There are/were maybe a dozen Kraken 33's, 40's and B24's and B33's here; , Gulf Chariot, Capricorn, Skipjack, Krisis, Legato and Rumble of the Guns were the most well known. They are still good performers compared to the latest crop of designs, a good balance between fast sailing and cruising, as you say - Lock knew his stuff.
     
  5. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Here's Sid sailing flat off (which cannot be done of course) showing the water stays and beam pinning to the main hull. The connections and pins will have to be good engineering ... they'll be taking quite a load. Suggestions anyone? The wing mast is the 30% version, boom vang runs in a semi circle across the cabin top and main sheet is half way down the cockpit length.
     

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  6. oldsailor7
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    oldsailor7 Senior Member

    Gary said:-"I self published it and sent copies to the designers and my friends - and sold a few copies too - but am chipping away at getting it published in larger numbers."
    Gary, you should advertise it on the Web, keep the no: of pages down to about 200 and sell it as an E book. Set a reasonable low price and people will pay straight into your bank account by credit card or PayPal. They can then download the book to their computers and print it out or read it on a reader if they want. The system is automatic and you can just see the money adding up in your bank account.
    Just type "Ebooks +how to" in Google search, for info.
    Cheers. Paddy.:D
     
  7. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Thanks Paddy, very thoughtful ... but anyway, people can download it for free here at Boatdesign.net already - Captain Sideburn mentions the coolmobility site - but they had read and downloaded it in pdf. 7.47 MB from Sailboats/Old Quarter Tonners - Magic Bus, page 7 thread - and asked to use it on their site, I said yes, of course - so there are a couple of places to get it now.
     
  8. captainsideburn
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    captainsideburn Junior Member

    Gary,
    Thanks heaps for keeping updates on the foiler, its really exciting and I keep checking back daily for something new :p
    Will it foil fully out of the water?
     
  9. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    It's interesting that since I changed from 40 degree angled straight foils to fixed inverted Y foils on Flash Harry, the boat, although it never crashes anymore, (which is an improvement plus) doesn't fly as easily as before either, requires stronger wind, above 15 knots - and never flies as high as before either (which is natural because the new foils are not so deep). So Harry is more a foil stabilised tri - although it will lift completely off in harder winds, especially when going to windward - but the boat is faster all round now I believe. Since this photograph was taken I have put a few degrees of dihedral into the main beam - to keep the windward foil clear of waves in lighter airs.
     

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  10. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Main hull changes; getting almost obese and certainly different to the original spare "C Class." Also the flat area for the swiveling beam - and one of Sid's amas. Have been drawing full size the beam bearing and locking pins and rod water stay attachments to beam and hull, essential things but too boring to post.
     

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  11. captainsideburn
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    captainsideburn Junior Member

    And these shapes can be got out of stressed ply?
     
  12. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    No problem - take a look at this, in 3.8mm.
     

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  13. captainsideburn
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    captainsideburn Junior Member

    sweet, I've wondered why more boats aren't designed using it
     
  14. captainsideburn
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    captainsideburn Junior Member

    I was just thinking, once we've swung the wing out we're going to need a very wide ramp to launch on, or with the amas at bow and stern have enough stability able to launch closed then swing open on the water?
     

  15. Gary Baigent
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    Gary Baigent Senior Member

    Scissoring Sid would definitely fall over on its side if launched scissored up, maybe half open would be okay but I envisage problems swinging it right open and pinning and attaching the water stays once the platform was afloat. Better to do it on land. The overall beam is 8 metres. Must be plenty of ramps that can handle that. Also the mast has to be erected too. Easier on land. The swinging and pinning will be quite a fast job but lifting the mast will have to be well organised and will take time. The trailerable versions of Sid will be better off with the smaller chord wing mast. You're getting ahead of me captain; I'm still thinking about structure and design at this stage.
     
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