Alternate planking style help

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by longfellow, Apr 16, 2009.

  1. longfellow
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 39
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: upstate NY

    longfellow Junior Member

    I am lofting a traditional plank on frame, oak floors and solid keel daysailer very similar to an O-Boat. I would like to get opinions on two approaches. First, if I build as designed with 5/8 planks on 3/4 inch square bent oak frames, what alterations to the hull, its seams etc should I do, given that the boat "may" (if I am still on the waiting list for a slip when it is complete) have to be trailered. Now, by trailered I mean only from the yacht club lot to the ramp, not over roads from my home. But still it will be a wet and dry life through the season.
    Next if I choose to build the hull using an alternate method of cold molding, then I would like some guidance regarding the specific alternate specifications (number of skins, lay directions, thicknesses... Do I still frame it up as designed? Basically when one chooses the "alternate" method of cold molding when you build (and here I would really appreciate opinions from designers, architects and builders who have actually done this - which is why I am not asking on that 'other' site; too many armchair builders.) what steps to you take? J. Guzzwell's book is a great one for when I actually get to the planking but he offers no design criteria/specifications (for obvious liability reasons I suppose).
    Thanks,
    Ed
     
  2. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 4,127
    Likes: 149, Points: 63, Legacy Rep: 2043
    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Hi Ed,

    Dave Gerr's book "Elements of Boat Strength" might be a useful reference in your case. Chapter 11 of that book includes a scantling rule for cold-moulded wood/epoxy construction, including how to determine skin thickness, number of skins, etc. and what modifications to the stringers and frames are permissible when switching to cold-moulding. For $30 or so it's a useful book to have around.

    I'm not one of those pro builders who has done such a design modification, so I can't offer much advice specific to your case. To be honest, I think if I were worried about the wet/dry issues with trailered plank-on-frame, I would probably be considering wood/epoxy strip plank instead of cold-moulding, simply because there are so many tales of cold-moulding proving to be more labour-intensive than expected.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
    Posts: 19,133
    Likes: 494, Points: 93, Legacy Rep: 3967
    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Cold molding is much more labor intensive and requires a fair bit of skill fitting each layer of planking too.

    I make conversions like these every so often, it's not particularly difficult.

    From a novice builder's view point, one of the strip planking methods, would be a better choice for a wet/dry cycled boat.

    Geer's book is helpful, but not all inclusive. It would be wise to have a new set of scantlings worked up for your build.
     

  4. longfellow
    Joined: Apr 2009
    Posts: 39
    Likes: 1, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 17
    Location: upstate NY

    longfellow Junior Member

    Thanks to both of you gentlemen.
    I am not sure how responsive a NA would be if I were to apporach him with the request to modify an existing set of plans, in all likelyhood a set that this same designer did not create himself. I could try it I suppose. I will definately try to pick up Gerr's book through interlibrary loan. As an alternative I may as well ask for some suggestions for designs that are as close as possible to the boat that i am interested in, but originally drawn as a "strip" boat or a ply on sawn and gusseted frame design. I'd prefer not to build a stitch and glue boat or lapstrake ply. Just a preference related to the type of woodworking I enjoy. The design that I wish to build is that of an O-Boat; 16-22 foot daysailer, comfotable, transom sterned, fore deck or small cabin, robust keel or combination keel and keel batten; well-detailed plans are a plus. I located a nice seventeen footer by Edson Schock which I will continue to look at. Thanks.
     
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