Alluminum Boat Repaint

Discussion in 'Metal Boat Building' started by Wesc, Jan 22, 2005.

  1. Wesc
    Joined: Jan 2005
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    Wesc New Member

    I am retoring an old 23' All weld aluminum boat.
    any advise on how to get the old paint and scale out of the hull and off the exterior.
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Use an aircraft type remover. It is formulated to work on aluminum.
     
  3. Dutch Peter
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    Dutch Peter Senior Member

    Can you have it sand/ice blasted?
     
  4. Wesc
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    Wesc New Member

    I was thinking about sand blasting but didn't know how it might effect the integrety of the aluminum. erosion?
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Ice blasted?! How does that work?
     
  6. Dutch Peter
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    Dutch Peter Senior Member

    Gonzo,

    Ice blasting works the same way as sand blasting. Don't ask me the particulars of the machine, but essentially water is frozen into small ice balls and released under high pressure. The advantage is that less dust is formed, so less of a health issue!
     
  7. Dutch Peter
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    Dutch Peter Senior Member

    The blaster can adjust the pressure of the equipment in order to just skim the surface and remove the paint. You'll loose the oxide skin of the aluminium, but that is back in a couple of hours/days.
    It shouldn't be a problem.
     
  8. Paul Mooney
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    Paul Mooney Junior Member

    sandblasting produces the best "tooth" as well as does a great job cleaning the oxide off, Take care to be sure the surface is grease oil free first. Check out Meta in France at http://www.reducostall.com/ they have been building aluminum yachts for 25 plus years. Their standard spec is sandblast and coat with "Inversalu" a zinc primer. They use this as a antifouling coating in mid to northern lattitudes. Below DWL gets 3 to 4 coats, topside get one coat Inversalu followed by epoxy followed by topcoats. Also see our paint spec at www.fairmetalboats.com we use the same spec now for steel or aluminum based on Meta's very successful corrosion control and coating life using zinc on aluminum.
     
  9. The ice blaster sounds like a poorly adjusted snow making machine. :p
     
  10. Arrowmarine
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    Arrowmarine Senior Member

    I agree with all above replys, but keep something in mind. A quick call to my brother, head painter at Alumaweld Boats, confirmed a couple things. If you are using a "zolatone" type paint inside, all you need to do is make sure to remove any loose paint(which he said can be done at your local car wash with a pressure washer held about six inches away from the surface) then reprime and shoot the zolo right over the top of the old paint. He says the old paint(as long as it is securley adheased to the metal, actually give a better bond than clean aluminum. The outside can be done in the same fashion, just add body filler to any low areas and respray right over the top. This has been done on many a repair boat in his, and my own experience(I fix em, he paints em:) and no returns to this day.
    REMEMBER THO, He does say the "right" way is to strip and clean all paint from the boat and start fresh. The above is meant to save a little time and money if so desired. Just depends on what you are trying to achieve with your finished product. ( Incidentaly, we have had great success with the soda blasting technique)
    Hope this helps, Joey
     
  11. MATTRESS GUY
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    MATTRESS GUY Junior Member

    Soda Blasting Is The Best , Less Sensitive, More Adjustable, And Less Messy, You Just Wash It When Your Done...soda , Just Like Baking Soda...i Dont Know All The Detailes But I Think Its Great!!!
     
  12. Wesc
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    Wesc New Member

    Thanks for all the advise. I think what I am going to do is use a mixture aircraft stripper, Staneless wire brushes & high presure washer. All of wich I have readly avalible.

    I have another question. When I removed the wood deck I discoverd many broken welds where the crossmembers atach to the hull. I have the equipment and have welded alluminum before but have never welded on the hull of a boat.

    Any advice.

    The boat is A 23FT 1984 ALWELD V Hull. I use a Miller 210 with a spoolmate.
     
  13. Clean aluminum = clean and pretty weld. Make a few passes on the underside of a support where it will not be seen to get your settings. :)
     
  14. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Use a proper aluminum alloy wire. Your supplier should know.
     

  15. Arrowmarine
    Joined: Jul 2004
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    Arrowmarine Senior Member

    Use 5356 alloy wire and clean your joints with a wire wheel. 210/ spoolmate is sufficient. Just practice a little first.
     
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