ali boat building questions

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Aluminium Mess, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. Aluminium Mess
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Aluminium Mess New Member

    Hey, I'm kinda new to serious engineering in general and new to the forum. But if I was to build an aluminium boat, I've got several questions:

    1. How to protect the Aluminium from Corrosion
    2. How to strengthen the boat: I know the sides (and bottom) are corrugated to some extent, but how would I do that? Would I have to physically bend the aluminium using brute force for each bend, or are there specialised tools?
    3. The biggest problem for me lies in the transom. I need to be able to put a 10 hp motor on that (maybe 4 stroke), so needs some real strength, without using a factory. HOW?

    Thanks in advance
     
  2. Thunderhead19
    Joined: Sep 2003
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    Thunderhead19 Senior Member

    describe the boat a little more. How big is it going to be. 1/8 ANSI5052 doesn't need any corrosion protection.
    You don't need corrugations in it, you can weld stiffeners on the inside.
    stiffening the transom with square tubing (usually 2"X1/4") whrerver it is needed is sufficient. I have a complete boat design; if you're interested in buying a set of plans contact my marketing guy, Jim at jim-miller@amstel-metal.com
     
  3. Aluminium Mess
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    Aluminium Mess New Member

    kl, thanks. I'm thinking of just building a simple flat-bottomed boat, maybe 3x1.2 ish metres. It's a first boat project, but one has to start somewhere!
    Thanks for the advice.
    Another thing, to put it together, any tips on welding Aluminium? It's really hard! I thought of nailing / riveting it together then sealing up the gaps...

    Thanks
     
  4. Thunderhead19
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    Thunderhead19 Senior Member

    If you use 1/8 plate you should be able to weld it nicely with practice. I'm not an expert, I'm not even a professional welder, and I don't know any tricks. There is a third option these days instead of riveting and welding. Adhesives are available that are as strong (for what you're doing) as welding, and are easier to use, and seal better than rivets. There's a wide variety of these products, but they are generally Methacrylates, come in two parts, and have a special dispensing gun. You should be able to find some at a reputable autobody repair shop because modern cars are largely glued together with this stuff. One brand is "Lord", "Locktite" makes a product too called H8000. In Canada a cartridge will cost $60-$80 for about a beer-bottle's amount, and the dispenser could run anywhere from $80-$200. You buddy at the auto-body shop should be able to help you glue it together and save you the cost of the dispenser. There are other products too that are "marine grade" like ATW-Plexus, but they are even more expensive (they are Lloyds certified, you know).

    I'm currently designing a series of small rowboats to be made out of light gauge galvanized steel. They're designed to use standard size sheets , and it looks like the materials to build, paint and outfit it will be about $200 (Canadian) It's easier to weld, and as light as 1/8 aluminum. Consider steel, it's great stuff. It rusts, but that's what paint is for.
     
  5. SeaSpark
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Holland

    SeaSpark -

    glued aluminium

    Glueing aluminium has been common practice in the aircraft industry for many years now.

    The conclusion of someone in holland (if i can find name or text i will post it) investigating the possibilities of building a 50ft glued aluminium sailing yacht:

    Gluing was cheap (saving the labour of an expencive welder).

    Conclusion of the tests with various glues: Building tolerances would bee very high (read expencive), a wide gap to fill between the aluminium (talking parts of millimeters) was disastrous for strength.

    I can imagine that with a small boat i may be possible to apply pressure to the whole length of the seam to be glued. Perhaps when you rivet a strip on the in and outside, the pressure of the rivets will distribute more evenly over the seam. Solutions without rivets may also be possible, vacuum pressure?
     
  6. Aluminium Mess
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    Aluminium Mess New Member

    OK, thanks guys!
    By the way, just to ask before I launch myself into this project, would you lot consider this a feasable task for a novicey-ish person to undertake?
     
  7. antonfourie
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    antonfourie Senior Member

    You could try a plywood and epoxy boat using stich and glue method, you would only require wood working tools and basic skills.
     

  8. Aluminium Mess
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    Aluminium Mess New Member

    Incidentally, about the stiffeners, I need to support the boat in 2 dimensions - across and along. How would I do this without sacrificing too much strength (as in having stiffener gaps etc)?
     
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