AIT Around In Ten

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Manie B, Feb 7, 2014.

  1. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

  2. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    Angel please help :D:D:D:D
    I cant find a blog or anything on Daniel Alary how he built his microyacht Poisson D'Avril
     
  3. sharpii2
    Joined: May 2004
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    Location: Michigan, USA

    sharpii2 Senior Member

    An excellent point.

    But where is the cut off length? 20 ft? 30 ft? 40 ft?

    Or should everyone have to buy rescue insurance? Even commercial fishermen?

    It appears the main reason he had to be rescued was he had heart problems. That could happen to anyone.

    Even healthy young people could develop serious illness at sea.

    I agree with your sentiments, but I think they open a huge can of worms.

    I wonder how the actual SAR people feel about this?
     
  4. DriesLaas
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    Location: South Africa

    DriesLaas Weekend Warrior

    Hi Manie,

    I think you should do the CLR when the boat is heeled, excluding the rudder.
    I like John Teale's method of a cardboard cutout that is balanced to find the correct position, but all the 2d CAD programs can also do it easily nowadays.
    One big advantage of the balanced lug is that it should be relatively easy to move the attachment positions on the sprit and boom a little, thereby tweaking the CE of the sailplan.
    On that subject, I destroyed my lovely lightweight inwale on the dinghy this weekend, when a particularly strong gust came through and the girls and I leaned out a bit too far.
    Heroic stuff, as in rig in the water, and the old man rowing back (lucky I have oars on the boat) to shore under a barrage of witty remarks from my crew.
    So glad it happened, because now I have an excuse to do a nice balanced lug rig. I need some 8 sq metres, can you give some pointers on the proportions? I know you have researched the balanced lug extensively.
     
  5. pdwiley
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    Location: Hobart

    pdwiley Senior Member

    Why is it that sometimes I feel like I'm sending messages to /dev/null? Nobody ever seems to want to even consider that people could just *go* and take their chances as people did for centuries, up until the very late part of the 20th Century.

    I don't actually care what size the boat is, that's irrelevant in this case except maybe insofar as a smaller boat causes more stress in heavy seas and that can exacerbate an existing condition.

    Why do people not go and just take their chances?

    Ben Carlin crossed the Atlantic in a converted Jeep and wrote a book about it.

    Serge Testa circumnavigated in a self-designed yacht, and wrote a book about it.

    John Riding sailed off in 'Sea Egg', and wrote a book about it. At least he wrote a book about crossing the Atlantic, but disappeared between NZ and Australia. Unfortunate but he knew the risks he was taking.

    My problem with this caper in the 21st Century is quite simply, people want to have the glory but expect other people to save their butts from easily foreseeable events, and to do so at other peoples' expense. I find this offensive on a pretty fundamental level as I regard it as hypocrisy.

    Worse, the backlash *will* prevent others from setting out. Take a look at the NZ nanny state laws. That's where things will go given enough reckless people doing things that are not sensible, just to grab the glory of being first to achieve something that 0.00001% of the population even notice, let alone care about.

    By all means go and have fun, terror and/or disaster. More power to you. But either buy insurance (if you can) or DON'T take an EPIRB and expect someone else to save you. Have the grace to die quietly somewhere if you can't get yourself out of something nobody forced you into.

    PDW
     
  6. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Cape Town South Africa

    Manie B Senior Member

    I fully agree

    "By all means go and have fun, terror and/or disaster. More power to you. But either buy insurance (if you can) or DON'T take an EPIRB and expect someone else to save you. Have the grace to die quietly somewhere if you can't get yourself out of something nobody forced you into."

    I am used to being responsible for my own safety, when I go on these trips there is no phone signal, Africa doesn't have fancy helicopters and if an "African" helicopter landed next to me I will not get into it, because of complete lack of maintenance and incredibly poorly trained people.

    In this case I don't think that Daniel Alary was properly prepared. He says that his heart monitors batteries died and he did not know how to take is medication - ABSOLUTE BOLLOCKS. That is lack of proper planning and preparation. I would also like to know how much testing was done on his boat. He claims that he has done a lot of sailing but this quest of his shows problems. Also how and why did the boat take on water? and what could he do about it.

    I would love to find more info on the boat (and the man)

    In South Africa today if you (could) use the emergency services you will pay.
    Anyway if you think you are having a heart attack how on earth is somebody going to get to you in time. That is a crappy argument. I am starting to think that he got tired and started to panic and then like in the movies "lets phone 911"

    Then why on earth did he want to go to Darwin?
    I don't know but this is sounding like a bullsheeeeter to me.
     
  7. Manie B
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Manie B Senior Member

    Dries you will see my sail up very soon
    working on the boom already
     

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  8. DriesLaas
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    DriesLaas Weekend Warrior

    That's looking good Manie.
    What is the idea around the hinge?
    Does the mast slide in a sleeve?
     
  9. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I've searched in both English and French and didn't find anything on the built either. But the guy is seventy years old so maybe putting it on the internet was not one of his priorities, also there could be limited internet facilities where he lives. Page 2 of the in post#106 linked article says he lives on Aratika (a tiny atoll in the Tuamotus in French Polynesia) which has only few inhabitants. He took off from French Polynesia, so that might be from home. If he doesn't speak a word of English1 I think he fooled them about being a retired Philosophy Professor2, or there might be some confusion here . . ;)

    - - Aratika - - on the map - - zoom in - - some of the houses - - airstrip north of the road just visible below the clouds - -

    Any private facilities there to put the built on the internet . . ? ?

    Maybe the rescue operation was the first appearance of ‘‘Poisson D'Avril’’ on the internet . . . :confused:
    1 see page 1 - - 2 see page 2 - - of the in post#106 linked article.
     
  10. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    I see I've only linked the ‘‘public airstrip’’ which is about 3 km NW of Paparara, the main hamlet of Aratika. But there is also a ‘‘restricted airstrip’’ (map - - satelite) about 15 km SSW of Paparara. The view of it got me thinking the conspiracy theories are not so weird as they seem, the missing Malaysian plane had a lot of fuel range and could be on such an old airstrip in an uninhabited place. A 777 needs about 3 km of landing strip but a master pilot could land it on 1 km . . . :idea:
     
  11. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    If want to respond on the missing Malaysian plane please do it here so this thread stays on track, thanks . . :)
     
  12. GTO
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    Location: Alabama

    GTO Senior Member

    Speaking as a taxpayer, I see nothing wrong with rescuing people going about a lawful endeavor that suffer from some form of distress.
    Most societies have chosen not to let citizens simply die if they can be helped. Which is why there are emergency phone/satellite systems, rescue vehicles and emergency medical centers and why, if you fall over on the street, you are not expected to drag yourself off into the bushes to die quietly.

    As for the risk SAR members face, it is not one they were forced into accepting either. They are doing it because they enjoy the thrill and excitement of flying/boating in wild weather and maybe even because they enjoy helping people. The same argument being made against the sailor could be made against them.
    It's no secret as to the dangers to be faced flying or sailing the airs and oceans of the world. No doubt there are some SAR members that would prefer to be paid and never have to leave a comfortable chair at home, but I suspect most are not like that.

    While in the USAF, we had to train constantly, i.e. face a certain level of risk every week and the USCG is no different. I'm guessing most SAR members are as happy to be actually "doing something" as opposed to simply simulating a rescue - which is still a risky maneuver that could see someone end up dead. I accept that other countries don't have the training and equipment the US has for SAR efforts. It's understandable that SAR efforts in such areas have more risk for the crews and those they are trying to help. However, it's still a volunteer effort that is no different in my mind to ER doctors, firemen, and ambulance personnel. I'm glad we have them.
     
  13. MoeJoe
    Joined: Apr 2012
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    Location: Stockholm, Sweden

    MoeJoe Junior Member

    I fully agree with your comments GTO. We can and should try to help friends or strangers in need. Even guys who head out on such an adventure with a serious heart condition.

    About Daniel Alary's AI9 (nine feet) boat that he sailed something like 8000 kilometres in 100 days. Not a small feat, altough it ended badly. That's around 1.8 knots in average speed if my quick calculation is somewhat correct. And almost twice the distance of a regular east to west Atlantic crossing. It would certainly be interesting to hear more about the boat and his personal account of the journey.
     
  14. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    The rescue was on july 8 - 2013, but there seems to be nothing before or after about the man or his boat on the internet. As a retired Philosophy Professor he must be known and have published on this field. But I didn't find anything on ‘‘Daniel Alary Philosophy’’ / ‘‘Alary Philosophy’’ / ‘‘Alary Professor’’, or in French ‘‘Daniel Alary Philosophie’’ / ‘‘Alary Philosophie’’ / ‘‘Alary Professeur’’. All there seems to be is more of the same info . . . :( -- link -- link -- :(

    P.S. - - - Maybe Professeur Amélie Alary is his sister . . ;)
     

  15. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    I have kicked around the idea of a hull for the AIT for a while, and think this is the direction i would go.
    ait.jpg
     
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