AIT Around In Ten

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by Manie B, Feb 7, 2014.

  1. rayman
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: brisbane

    rayman Senior Member

    Hi Angel, thanks for that post, I had forgotten that it was so far back in time. I do hope Manie regains his interest in the wee boat. Angel, a few days ago I got onto a huge joke thread, not the funny boat joke thread but cartoons of any and everything, nothing smutty and I am sure I went into it somewhere here, do you know of it???
    regards rayman
     
  2. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Mainies trip was never an option. Not only was his boat poorly designed for any long sailing trip, but he had no open sea experience.

    At least the old guy in the Torres Strait had a boat that sailed reasonably efficiently, looking at the photos. He had done a couple of circumnavigations before he claims, so he knew when to quit.

    This 60 footer just spent 9 days from Perth to Tasmania 3 days ago, across the Southern Ocean, and they encountered continuous 15 metre waves. You have never seen a crew so glad to be back on land.

    MikesBoat01.jpg
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Angélique
    Joined: Feb 2009
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    If they had cruised for fun than they would have sailed through Indonesia and around PNG to visit you, and so they would have had much nicer cruising options and more time to enjoy it.

    If you go in a 10' boat then you don't have to earn and maintain a 60 footer, and also not have to earn the costs of cruising one, so there's the source of the extra time.

    AIT (Around In Ten) is about going around in a 10 footer, and not necessarily about a minimum amount of time underway, or a minimum of stops, or rounding the great capes, or going through Torres Strait and the like, or going into the southern ocean.

    The first one to finish will set a record anyway, no matter how long under way, or what route is taken, can even go (parts) with two, but that's only if you like each other very much . . :eek:

    It would be a nice start to do it coastal and island hopping, in relatively good weather windows, and wait for the right seasons for crossings, while doing a bit of work to earn some money for a living underway, and go through Panama and Suez, pirates all around the world would be the biggest health risk on this route though.

    Look for some inspiration about this travel style at the 1991 to 1997 circumnavigation of Rory McDougall and his Wharram Tiki 21 Cooking Fat aka Cookie, which I thinks is still the lightest boat ever that sailed around the world.

    WayBack Machine: Rory and Cookie
    The lightest boat ever that sailed around the world . . . ?

    Circumnavigation 1991 to 1997 of Rory McDougall with his 6.4 m Wharram Tiki 21 Catamaran Cooking Fat aka Cookie.
    Circumnavigation 1991 1997 Rory McDougall Wharram Tiki 21 6.4 m Catamaran Cooking Fat aka Cookie.jpg

    More recent: Rory and Cookie Blog
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2019
  4. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    What you say is 100% correct.
    BUT
    Manies little craft was the most awkward, under canvassed, inefficient hull design, that would have made island skipping impossible. It wouldn't have gone upwind.
    Such badly designed boats are like the barrel that is currently crossing the Atlantic - just a drift and pray job.

    So, not being able to maneuver around reefs and rocky shores, it would have had to be a deep water drifter, and in amongst the big monsters. Not at all fun.
     
  5. Stevealonso
    Joined: Apr 2020
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    Location: London

    Stevealonso New Member

    Does anyone have the details of the original legs for the AIT please. Cheers
     

  6. A II
    Joined: Jun 2020
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ the Netherlands

    A II no senior member → youtu.be/oNjQXmoxiQ8 → I wish

    Far as I know there are no prescribed legs for an AIT attempt. Just go around the world by use of both hemispheres, the use of canals and as many stops as one would like are all allowed. No matter what time used, the first one to finish will set a record, as no one has registered a finish yet with a max 10' boat.
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2020
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