Aftmast rigs???

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by jdardozzi, May 28, 2002.

  1. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    I was just cruising back thru this subject tread, and ran across this old vessel design that was a definitely an influence on my thoughts at the time.
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/sailboats/aftmast-rigs-623-56.html#post755009

    Angantyr, full size.jpg

     
  2. sharpii2
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    sharpii2 Senior Member

    This is what I think off, when I think of a masthead rig cutter. It's nice to see how everything sort of just works out.

    The mast ends up at the widest point of the deck, so it gets excellent shroud angles. The fore stay and the back stay are both roughly the same length, and they too have excellent angles.

    The two stay sails make balancing the boat relatively easy, by furling one or the other, depending how much the main is reefed. And the mast is not too far from the cockpit either, in a part of the boat which will experience the least amount of pitching.

    Not only is this rig handy but it is also potentially quite strong for the amount of sail area it sports.

    The only fly in the ointment is the inner jib has no direct back stay support. This could hamper its luff tension and windward ability, as well as risk over stressing the mast. Two possible solutions are:

    1.) making the mast strong enough to take the stress, or
    2.) provide running back stays.

    despite this potential flaw, it is one of two of my favorite Bermuda rigs.

    The other is the 3/4 sloop.

    After that, it would be the masthead sloop with an over built jib furling system.
     
  3. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Roller Furling Genoa

    Over the years there has been many naysayers expressing reservations about roller REEFING sails.

    I just ran across a few little discussions/references to roller furling genoas utilizing more modern sail materials.
    TitaniumCarbon genoa.jpg

    Passagemaker Titanium - Carbon Single-sided Taffeta


    Titanium Beidseitig Taffeta - Cruising Genua
     
  4. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Lash Tangs instead of Terminals attach rigging to spar

    Not exactly my idea of a 'wrap around connection'. but it is a soft fiber technology in lieu of traditional tangs..

    ....found on Rigging Projects blog and Facebook pages.
    "One of the details we specified for a new Hall Spars & Rigging Swan 82 spar: We used Blew Stoub lash tangs instead of t-terminals to interface the Future Fibres supplied Aramid runners with the spar. The lash loops give us better articulation, easy servicing and lower profile."
     

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    Last edited: Jul 9, 2016
  5. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Old meets New

    A sort of older lashing method updated by new materials.

    Sort of wrap around...
     

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  6. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Attached Files:

  7. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    new Flatten Batten developments

    http://riggingnews.blogspot.com/2014/05/new-flatten-batten-development.html
    This just might be a solution for battens in my roller furling mizzen sail :idea:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNRc2IX82s4
     
  8. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Looking for more photos of 'cheek blocks', or whatever might be the best name for these items? Reference these postings:
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/multihulls/soft-rigging-solutions-47997-2.html#post735744

    proper name for these connection items

    couple more photos
     
  9. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Attached Files:

  10. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Aft Mast on Trimaran, failure

    Please note that I am willing to face up any failures of my aft-mast rig concept, and attempt to determine what the problems might be.

    I remember this one that was brought up a number of years back (2006), on this subject thread. During some recent websurfing I discovered that I had not addressed this failure with the same explanation on this subject thread, that I did on that other one. So here is some of that story.

    The quote above was what I posted on this forum.

    However I also reviewed the gentleman's logs he had posted, and discovered this quote that I posted on another forum:
    So it appears as though his reasoning for changing from his original aftmast configuration over to a conventional configuration was based on the materials he was left with following the incident and his insufficient funds.
    He never really had negative comments about the rig, in fact most were praise. And both regrettable and inexplicable, he never made any more comments about rigging subjects at all, positive or negative?? I never understood this guy.
     
    Last edited: Jul 16, 2016
  11. DennisRB
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    DennisRB Senior Member

  12. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Central Nacelle

    Appears as though they have taken down their website ?
     

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  13. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    I'm assuming that is Italian language? Wonder if we can get an interpretation of that text?

    Ah ha, I used google for an interpretation:
    https://translate.google.com/translate?hl=en&sl=it&u=http://www.cantierino.it/AGALLERIA/orsobianco/a.html&prev=search

    Surprisingly I found very little text about the rig design itself. I did find this:
    I think was probably having lunch like this:
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Jul 17, 2016
  14. brian eiland
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    brian eiland Senior Member

    Pertaining to the subject of a central nacelle and the longitudinal stiffness it adds to the catamaran hull form,...there was this photo of an America's Cup cat posted recently:
    [​IMG]

    ...back in 2003 I had posted this....
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/big-cat-alt-cbs-sail-rigs-2225.html
     

  15. CT249
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    CT249 Senior Member

    I think the central "spine" dates back to Amaryllis, and of course a more recent example was seen on the Prout's Phantom Wake in about 1980, which was definitely shaped as a wave splitter.

    Centreline centreboards were common in Aus for years but were dumped because of the end-plate issues, I think
     
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