aft cockpit

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Mcbeth, Jan 19, 2014.

  1. Mcbeth
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    Location: Houston BC Canada

    Mcbeth Junior Member

    I have recently acquired a Brandlmayr 41 steel ketch, she is sitting in my back yard 250 miles from saltwater. I intend to spend two years refurbishing then use her on the west coast, for two summers, Mexico, and Hawaii after that if all goes OK.

    I have started refurbishing and have been studying the cockpit (aft). Why is it there?, why not simply remove it and go to a covered flush deck? I will gain space below deck, and gain usable space above.

    Is the cockpit there to keep one from the wind and spray, to keep the skipper from being washed away.... or is it there because it has always been that way?
     
    Last edited: Jan 19, 2014
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The cockpit offers some protection and gives you a place to work the lines and steer more comfortably. You can find ancient boats where the crew simply stood on deck. A cockpit lets you, for example, work a winch for the sheets without having to lay on your belly.
     
  3. Mcbeth
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    Mcbeth Junior Member

    Thank you for enlightening me, as you suspect I am new to this size of boat, I have sailed smaller mono's and had a very fast cat for a while.

    I have lots of questions,

    Mcbeth is ketch rigged, the previous owner suggested doing away with the mizzen mast, as it is positioned right in front of the cockpit, and due to the size of the sail it does not contribute that much. If this were to happen would the main mast have to be re-positioned? or is it best to leave well enough alone? I intend to keep her offshore capable.
     
  4. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Ketch rigs have a few advantages. For example, you can douse the main and have a reduced sail area without changing the balance of the boat. Also, they are great for hanging hammocks and tarps.
     
  5. Mcbeth
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    Mcbeth Junior Member

    So

    Thanks,
    I am thinking this vessel is as good as it can be then, I will proceed with paint, some minor rust issues, cabin upgrades, engine rebuild, working at getting the diesel and boat smell to be be gone, and so on.

    Can you tell me if the stainless cable shrouds and stays have a lifespan? it all looks perfect as new. Some Morris some swedged fittings.

    Also, the topsides down to the water line were flame galvanized after the hull was constructed in 1973, the paint is flaking and giving up, it shows grey where the paint has lifted, I need to remove the paint, but I cant sandblast or sand as it will ruin the galvanizing. Is there a way to do this without breaking the bank??
     
  6. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Paint remover is one way to do it. If there is no flammable insulation directly on the hull, you can also use heat to remove the paint. Fittings can be inspected for cracks with any of the dye systems. Also, a visual inspection by someone experienced would be invaluable.
     
  7. Mcbeth
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    Mcbeth Junior Member

    Thanks

    My start with boat design has been a pleasure!
     
  8. WestVanHan
    Joined: Aug 2009
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    WestVanHan Not a Senior Member

    Congrats Mcbeth and welcome to the site!

    I second Gonzo's recommendation-if you're not sure of what you know... get or pay someone to have very thorough inspection of the boat.


    Good luck.
     
  9. Westfield 11
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    Westfield 11 Senior Member

    The purpose of the mizzen on your particular ketch may be more for balancing the helm than for thrust. I would not remove it before either having the sailplan and underbody checked by a competent NA or actually sailing the boat in heavier winds to see what the weather helm is like.
     
  10. Mcbeth
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    Mcbeth Junior Member

    Mizzen mast

    The reason I was considering doing away with the mizzen, is when I construct the dodger with Aluminum it would mean having a weather boot where the mast goes through the roof, as well as making the boat less cluttered.
    with the information I have received I can see that I could be bastardizing a carefully thought out sail plan by a NA which I am not.

    I do have another question though, This vessel is a Brandlmayr 41. 45' OA
    She was built in a shipyard in Manatoba 3/16 steel sheeting, 9000lb boiler chips/concrete in the bottom 14" of the keel, 500 gal fuel, 500gal water in the keel. 47' main, 33' mizzen 6'3" draft 11' oa height.
    Is this vessel (in your opinion) capable of offshore weather/broaching/ self wrighting ability??
     
  11. Mcbeth
    Joined: Jan 2014
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    Mcbeth Junior Member

    Progress update

    We are currently wading in the snow and it will be with us for another 4 months. I have constructed a tarp shelter, with trusses and two 16'work benches, it has two stairways to a platform that fits along the port side at deck level, it is wired with plugs and lights, I also have two welders, dc stick 120v wire feed, the structure is 17'x48'x19'high with a barrel stove, so it is workable down to -5c
    Mcbeth has been stripped completely, last summer, during a hot spell, I had the deck and the entire inside sandblasted to bare metal and primed with International epoxy, the galvanized topside was able to be blasted without effecting the galvanizing too much, the topside was coated with off white finishing coat, International epoxy as well.
    I had to do two cut outs on the hull (3/16 steel) midships both sides, one is 10"x36" the other is 32"x96" I also did a 24"x4" cutout on the fuel tank in the same area where the large cut out is. Oddly, the rest of the lower hull is pretty good. the cut out corners are 5" radius.

    The cabin sides where the port lights are, (5 per side) will be be replaced as well, the portlight sealing system did not work and I believe they leaked from close to the beginning of its 40 year life, resulting in a lot of rust scale on the inside, penetrating through in places.

    I am re-using the Fuller Brush portlights, haha I know, that sounds really bad, but they are actually pretty robust, and have survived remarkably well, in addition, portlights are hideously expensive. I will construct deadlights for them and have them on board for use if need be.
    The inside 2" spacers that were used with the portlights were cut from wood, and were pretty well rotted out, I do not want to use wood again. I will be using closed cell fire retardant spray foam insulation throughout the hull, and I am considering using 2" blue SM styrofoam for the portlight spacers.

    Here are my questons,

    (will the 2" blue SM styrofoam be suitable for the spacers? and if not what would be a suitable non rotting material to use.

    (why is it not recommended to use sprayfoam below the water line?

    (The fuel tank generates heat when the engine is being used (hot return fuel) so would it be good to install a cooler for the return fuel, to reduce heat and condensation below the waterline?

    (I have sandblasted the inside of the domestic water tank, apx 250 gal, what is a suitable potable water tank liner?

    Seasons Greetings!
     

  12. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    gonzo Senior Member

    There is a water tank epoxy. It is routinely used in municipal water tanks.
     
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