Affordable seaworthy cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by goodwilltoall, Jul 31, 2010.

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  1. relcraft23
    Joined: Apr 2013
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    Location: ireland

    relcraft23 Junior Member

    just popping in for 6 monthly update, see the design is still evolving, don't forget the periscope
     
  2. goodwilltoall
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    Location: nation of Ohio

    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Greetings,

    Showing some progress of recent work. For some reason the hull photo keeps showing up very thin on both phone and camera. Its not that skinny at all.

    To begin the hoop house idea was abandoned and went with an A-frame which cost about $700.00 vs. about $1,300.00 for hope house, its basically two 2x4x16' with a collar tie for frames and setup 48" O.C. with two 2x4 running lengthwise at the top. It took 20 hours to build and set up but like everything else, searching for and bring materials took considerable time and would say that part is about 25% of the work overall for everything.

    As you can see the chine logs were added in, two pieces of treated 1.0" x 2.5" butt jointed. The hull was cut out with the already built in 1x longs on bottom which left two layers of 11/32 ply still left to add and the hull sides already had one layer of 11/32 on with one more layer over that. The frames were only able to accommodate a 1.0" x 1.25" notch but I feel the ply has taken up the slack and all is sufficiently tied together.
     

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  3. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    The fwd. cutwater is built and completely solid wood and epoxy. All sheathing is also completed with one more sand-fill-sand procedure which will have to wait as a result of the cold weather as in some places the epoxy is still a lil tacky. It reached about 40-50 degree which made it good to work as most everything epoxied was wet on wet.

    The cloth is onsite and plan on four layers 6oz at bottom/keel and two layers 6oz on sides with additional four layers of tape at chines. Forgot to mention all plywood is encapsulated and epoxy bonded to hull. I think this is perfect with just one coat as water will eventually get in and might already be in now but eventually it reaches the equilibrium and will still minutely breath to allow moisture vapor to escape from the inside, on the exterior there will be at least three coats which effectively seals most water intrusion.

    Some lessons I learned.
    1. Get the epoxy very warm. Everyday I would bring it inside and it would achieve about 70 degree but when it was brought outside the torpedo heater would be directed at the 5 gal buckets, this dramatically improved mixing and application.
    2. Went to walmart and bought a quart measurement cup and pint cup (with handles) and would just dip into the bucket, dispense, then hang and get perfect 2 to 1 mix.
    3. I was constantly dipping my hands into vinegar to neutralize any epoxy that might get on them. I smelled like pickle until after work when I would shower but at least had no epoxy on me.
    4. To install the plywood I would screw in two screws in the middle on the panel about 7" apart and then use yellow tie wire(easier to find when lost than other colors) to connect them and make a temporary handle to carry into place. This allowed carrying into place 4'x5' panels by myself quite easily.
     
  4. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Still amazed at how well the epoxy even with just one coat protects.

    The sides above water will be 100% high gloss acrylic paint and most likely will put it on the epoxy while tacky. This was done with my truck as I posted a few years ago and with constant use and heavy abrasion it has just slowly worn off but remained intact maybe a light sanding to knock off some marks for the second coat but that's it. I like the work boat style with the drabby colors it just makes me feel safe knowing that the paint was applied for soundness and integrity rather than looks.

    My question is " what would be the recommended paint or primer for UV protection until the bottom paint is applied?"
     
  5. Sailor Alan
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Location: Gig Harbor WA

    Sailor Alan Senior Member

    Well done, congratulations on your progress.

    I use Rustolium concrete sealer to seal and protect the wood. It goes on fast like water, is cheap, and should be a good base for your future coatings.

    I do not know which of your various sketches you eventually built, but it looks long and lean. As such, I recomend multiple masts, possibly 3. I suggest looking at tapered aluminium flagpoles as a mast, each one about the LOA of your boat. These should be deck stepped, with NO stays or shrouds. I can sketch up a steel base/bracket for you to mount the mast to the boat using either the original flagpole flush mount, or a sleave, whichever the flagpole is designed for. As Aluminium does not like a 'point load' the boom must be mounted to a seperate bracket, part of the mast mounting in this case. If you want a sail track, use Aluminium. Pop rivet one end to the mast, then bow the mast slightly, and pop rivet on the other end. This will tension the sail track and make it straight while you add the rest of the pop rivets. A fiberglass flagpole is also satisfactory, but is less comparable with pop rivets.

    I would personally use a loose footed boom with a 'club' head like the Bahama sloops, possibly including raked masts, but that is a personal choice.
     
  6. Pericles
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    An eighty page marathon. At first glance, I thought I was seeing decking & the coaming surrounding an open cockpit, until I enlarged the view & realised it was the box keel & the hull was upside down.

    Eye balling the 3rd photo I guestimate the two scaffold boards to be 12 to 14 inches wide, so the beam at its widest is about 4.5 boards wide, or about 60 inches. The sides of the 50 feet long hull do not exhibit much flare, so it would appear likely that it would incline on its side if launched. There was talk in earlier pages of some form of internal ballast & that the building moulds would be left in place as internal bulkheads. How does one move forward through a longitudinal series of watertight compartments only five feet wide? This has to be the centre hull of a trimaran. Where are the amas?
     
  7. Sailor Alan
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    Sailor Alan Senior Member

    High Wycombe eh, a REALY beautiful place. I lived for a time in Stains, and have visited friends in Reading many times. Are there many thames skiffs around your part of the thames.
     
  8. Pericles
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    Sailor Alan,

    Like the curate's egg. Good in parts. Thames Police have taken into custody a number of people for trying to join ISIS or for aiding & abetting those who have. It's a problem the UK will have to deal with in the coming years as a result of the socialist labour Blair/Brown government & EU open borders policy.

    Past immigration such as that of the French Protestant Huguenots of whom 50,000 arrived in the early 18th century, even then was not without its difficulties.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huguenot

    Immigration should emulate the making of mayonnaise, by which olive oil is added to eggs drip by drip in order that the mixture does not curdle. Too fast & the resulting mess is unpalatable.

    The best time to see Thames skiffs is during Swan Upping. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swan_Upping

    The Queen's current Swan Marker is David Barber, MVO, who owns D B Marine, directly opposite The Ferry in Cookham, a place I frequent..........frequently.

    https://www.google.co.uk/webhp?sour...&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=the ferry at cookham

    Nearby Bourne End hosts an historic regatta, held at the end of May and featuring the national Thames A Rater championships.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thames_A-class_rater

    Did you ever drink at the Swan Hotel on the Hythe in Staines-on-Thames? I've managed to moor there once or twice.

    All the best,

    Perry
     
  9. SukiSolo
    Joined: Dec 2012
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    Location: Hampshire UK

    SukiSolo Senior Member

    Yup, I'll second the Swan at Egham Hythe (Staines), a fine pint of Fullers to be had there. Upper Thames used to have a railway running next to it, I can remember many moons ago seeing steam engines pulling the carriages. Probably shut by Beeching it was that long ago....;) Nice stretch of water for the Raters though, more open than you would think. I'm more familiar with their lower Thames haunts down Kingston way.
     
  10. Pericles
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

    The railway still runs from Maidenhead as far as Bourne End, crossing the Thames just by the marina & Upper Thames Club. It used to run through to High Wycombe, but that section was closed & lifted by 1970. The Marlow Donkey still runs as well & there's talk of reopening the lifted line as a tramway.

    http://www.mdrs.org.uk/wycmaidmarlow.htm

    http://www.maidenhead-advertiser.co...Bourne-End-to-Wycombe-train-line-06052014.htm

    http://www.geowiki.com/New_Adlestrop_Railway_Atlas.pdf

    C'mon summer.

    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/75/CookhamLockReach01.JPG

    http://thames.me.uk/s00950.htm
     
  11. Sailor Alan
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    Sailor Alan Senior Member

    My understanding was the Huguenots brought lace making and weaving to England, and the rest, as they say, was history.

    A colleague , Manchester U Professor, is a 'somthing' of the worshipful 'somthing' of weavers and dyers, and gets dressed up in period costume to count swans (I think) every year.
    I also saw several Thames Slippers on the river too, but whether they were original, or new I could not tell. Elegant is the only word. I was lecturing on 3D weaving of carbon fiber at the time.
     
  12. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

  13. Pericles
    Joined: Sep 2006
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    Location: Heights of High Wycombe, not far from River Thames

    Pericles Senior Member

  14. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    1 person likes this.

  15. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    Btw, do you know where to find a model or line plan of a sipper? There's one among the samples of Carson Hulls but just one is not much of a sampling.
     
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