Affordable seaworthy cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by goodwilltoall, Jul 31, 2010.

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  1. goodwilltoall
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    Location: nation of Ohio

    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Greetings,

    Thanksgiving in America, Thankyou, Father in Heaven for all your blessings upon the saints through your Holy son Jesus the Christ.

    Updated engine sailor: 520 gallons diesel, 230 gallons water, good enough for at least 4,000 miles. Stern would sag when tanks full, but leaving on good weather window the fuel aft can be used first and trimmed with in a week. Appro. 20,000 displ.

    Helm area is reduced to allow 20" deck on starboard for easy access forward. 6"x6" upright post at corners of helm station to assure house will not be ripped off if overturned or hit by wave. Bolger type gimballed chair for "ze Meister". Drop boards and sliding hatch something to think about on long journey.

    Box hull with flat bottom for maximum roll dampening and bouyancy. Riding sail, full keel, and 6-1 L-B will make good ride. Threw in the tabernacle for free, 10' clearance for canal cruising. Flopper stoppers are silly and relying on engine alone crossing oceans is unseamanlike. Dink to be strapped aft. Engine room was pushed aft since it lighter than fuel and brings berths closer to axis.
     

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  2. frank smith
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: usa

    frank smith Senior Member

    If you used a steel box keel and moved the engine room to under the pilot house you could lower the house , and get a better stateroom aft.
     
  3. goodwilltoall
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    Location: nation of Ohio

    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Frank,

    Good thought, would use steel box keel for fuel. Scribled up new engine version but still think sails are the way to go.
     
  4. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    You are a really endless source of enlightment and entertainment goodwilly. How do you think they shipped the computer you are typing such nonsense in? With a rowboat?:D
     
  5. goodwilltoall
    Joined: Jul 2010
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    Location: nation of Ohio

    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Apex,

    Shippers are one thing, but to be on the ocean 1500 miles from land with a broken screw, its much better to be prepared to just slowly sail on than rely on others to come save you if at all possible.

    Peace.
     
  6. gunship
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Sweden

    gunship Senior Member

    with a clipper, du-uh:p

    Why do you mount broken screws on your boat?;)
     
  7. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    This is sort of getting old. If you know so much about boating, why are you still flipflopping around with the plans? I thought this craft was to be on the water by March. It's time to do something or get off the pot.

    Relying on engines is unseamanlike, but the plan is to set forth with a boat, a SAILBOAT no less, loaded down at the stern with fuel which has to be quickly used up to allow the boat to float correctly. Do you think God is going to approve of this sort of stuff? Do you think God is going to look lightly on your hazarding innocent lives for the sake of your wanderlust? Or is this a Mission From God that He has commanded you to do?
     
  8. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    Let dreamers dream.
     
  9. Pierre R
    Joined: May 2007
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    Location: ohio, USA

    Pierre R Senior Member

    You got your answer in post 634

    What a very nice way of saying I give up.
     
  10. MatthewDS
    Joined: Mar 2010
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    Location: Juneau, Alaska

    MatthewDS Senior Member

    @Goodwilltoall,

    It's about time to start building a model of your boat, something about 36-48" would be about right.

    This would do a several things. First, it would give you some hands on experience with your design, viewing it in 3D may make clear some of the criticisms you have received up to this point.. Secondly, it would allow you to sort out major deficiencies in the design in the safety of your local pond. And thirdly, it would improve your credibility on this forum, by showing us that you are serious about building something, and not simply wasting our time.
     
  11. peterAustralia
    Joined: Mar 2006
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    Location: Melbourne Australia

    peterAustralia Senior Member

    goodwilltoall

    may I be permitted to make some guesses to your design goal

    A long, narrow hull shape, so I assume that you are interested in a hullshape that needs little energy to power it.
    It looks as though your craft is a kind of efficient displacement motor cruiser, which can be powered by sails when the wind is from a favourable quarter?
    Shoal draught capability,
    Simple, relatively fast and relatvely economical to build
    Standing headroom in the main cabin for comfort
    You want blue water capability

    Is this a reasonable summary of your design goals?

    I assume the design goal is done to lower operating costs and to be kind to the environment

    Now to the boat that fits this

    an inboard diesel is probably more efficient than an outboard
    your hullform is long and lean, should be efficeient power cruiser hull provided conditions are reasonable

    I would suggest that having your ballast lower down would assist in stability, ballast can even be wet sand, wet gravel, scrap iron. Lead is the ideal but you could get away with something with lower density should you be prepared to accept slighly lower performance.

    By having the ballast lower down, you could use less of it for the equivalent stability aid. By reducing weight you can make the hullform more efficient to run.

    If you go for a shallow V bottom, instead of a flat bottom, this should assist in getting your internal ballast down lower. It should also assist with reducing any potential pounding in a seaway.

    Your hullform where the maminum width quickly tapers into the ends, is suspectable to sagging. If your hull ends are supported by wave crests, the center of the boat will be less able to provide stability, thus extending your width more into the ends would have a lot of benefit. The downside is extra drag would be small.

    It would be nice if you had a maximum beam of around 11 to 12ft, personally I would like to see a little bit of flare, but that is me.

    Looks as though, in your diagrams over time. you are slowly reducing your topside structures. This will result is less topweight, and less windage, this is a good thing.

    Your current diagram, with the tabernacle placed where it is, means that the mast pivots into the main hull. Ideally with some adjustments to the tabernacle placement, you could avoid this hull penetration.

    It would be nice to know what beam you envisage, it would be nice to know what your budget is. Your interior layout, with the shower where it is seems to take up a lot of space. If it was located to the side, seems that it would free up the cabin a lot and make it more spacious

    yes, apex hassles you,,, dont take it personally.. he is just rubbing you,,, I think he is waiting for you to realise that the design project you have undertaken is very difficult and complex.
     
  12. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Thats about right. I wanted to point him towards a more professional approach right from the beginning. Giving up on the phantasy one could build a 50ft boat at 12000$, and accepting, that a safe blue water boat cannot be designed by a novice with dead zero experience. He did not like that, it was not confirming his preconception. Well, that is how it goes here, and this became the thread with the biggest discrepancy between title and reality.
    But still goody is trying to achieve the impossible.
    Good luck, Goodwilly...
     
  13. Pierre R
    Joined: May 2007
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    Pierre R Senior Member

    From what I can see the design really has not changed significantly in 634 posts. Oh yeah it now has some what of a keel.

    At the top of the SOR is the dimensional proportions of Noah's Arc. :rolleyes:
     
  14. gunship
    Joined: Jun 2009
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    Location: Sweden

    gunship Senior Member

    I'd rather say he took the dimensions from Hans Majest├Ąts Skepp Wasa, Which sank on its maiden voyage in Stockholm Harbour 1628.
     

  15. BATAAN
    Joined: Apr 2010
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    Location: USA

    BATAAN Senior Member

    Another design tool for something like this is the 'flotational model', as detailed by NA Weston Farmer in his book 'From My Old Boatshop'.
    Basically a 3/4" scale model made of cardboard frame planked with 1/8" balsa and varnished. This is loaded with scale weights and can show many weaknesses in a design. Westy's book is a fabulous box on knowledge, since he started in the 1920s and learned a thing or two in 40 years of design.
     
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