Affordable seaworthy cruiser

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by goodwilltoall, Jul 31, 2010.

  1. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    Why is it some people find it necessary to force their religious BS on others ?
    No need to answer , just dont do it .

    Boat design is science , not pie in the sky. This is the reason I like it .
    Either it works or it dont.
     
  2. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Why work with erroneous numbers? That is not even close to the cubic feet of your boat in the drawing.
     
  3. MatthewDS
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    MatthewDS Senior Member

    Quote: "Use that number and take any other hull and proportion it to equal it 2083.....So think of any boat you can and see if it can stand in a head to head comparison with the Ark."

    What on earth are you talking about? Are you honestly suggesting boat design by numerology?

    I don't see any point at all to what you are doing. If you really want to recreate the ark, why not build a vessel based on a design from the time period? I'm assuming you think that the flood happened somewhere around 5000 BCE, so open a history book, find out what they were building then, and try to replicate it. The most likely construction methods are bundled reeds or lapped cedar or similar.

    I also think that everybody has gotten so worked up about the superstitious nonsense behind his idea that they lost sight of the actual problem here.

    You can't scale dimensions from one design to another and get good results. It doesn't work that way. All the magical thinking in the world won't change the fact that even if you had a complete set of plans of the Ark, you couldn't scale them down to 50 feet, and have a boat even remotely close to the original.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2010
  4. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member

    Here ya go , It could be built with lumberyard material

    [​IMG]
     
  5. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    The wood is cypress and it grows in the Middle East today. Ask the Israelis and Lebanese who just fought a battle over a cypress tree.
     
  6. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Cyprus is an island.
     
  7. MatthewDS
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    MatthewDS Senior Member

    Ah, thanks. Cypress was my first instinct (hence the edit) However, I remembered that Cheops Funeral Boat was made of Lebanese Cedar, and that Cedar had been used in Egypt at least to 4000 BCE, so I went with that.
     
  8. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Do you mean 4000 Before Christ? He really is a historical figure even if you don't follow him. We won't let you scrub him from this thread. BCE is a new term invented by secularists to erase Christ from history. We will not yield while we yet breathe.
     
  9. frank smith
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    frank smith Senior Member


    then troll on
     
  10. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    That is how you fish.
     
  11. MatthewDS
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    MatthewDS Senior Member

    Not to get completely sidetracked, but the term "Common Era" was first used in 1615 by Johannes Kepler. Anyway, back to building the Ark!
     
  12. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    If I lash together a bunch of logs for an affordable seaworthy cruiser, should I remove the bark?
     
  13. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Yes, Kepler had a hard llife and his faith was severely tested. Even so all he did was remove Christ from the decriptor but retained the numerical quality based upon Christian timekeeping. What does that prove? Zilch.
     
  14. wardd
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    wardd Senior Member

    Seems christians had little or nothing to do with the calendar until pope Greggory.


    The Julian calendar, a reform of the Roman calendar, was introduced by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, and came into force in 45 BC (709 ab urbe condita). It was chosen after consultation with the astronomer Sosigenes of Alexandria and was probably designed to approximate the tropical year, known at least since Hipparchus. It has a regular year of 365 days divided into 12 months, and a leap day is added to February every four years. Hence the Julian year is on average 365.25 days long.
    The Julian calendar remained in use into the 20th century in some countries as a civil calendar, but has been replaced by the Gregorian calendar in nearly all countries.[1] The Roman Catholic Church and Protestant churches have replaced the Julian calendar with the Gregorian calendar, but the Orthodox Church (with the exception of Estonia and Finland) still use the Julian calendar for calculating the dates of moveable feasts. Some Orthodox churches have adopted the Revised Julian calendar for the observance of fixed feasts, while other Orthodox churches retain the Julian calendar for all purposes.[2] The Julian calendar is still used by the Berber people of North Africa, and on Mount Athos.
    The notation "Old Style" (OS) is sometimes used to indicate a date in the Julian calendar, as opposed to "New Style" (NS), which either represents the Julian date with the start of the year as 1 January or a full mapping onto the Gregorian calendar. This notation is used in reference to dates from tsarist Russia (the country did not switch to the new calendar until 1918).
     

  15. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Wood Butcher

    Still, the dates are the same.
     
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