Advice on Maine Winter Boat

Discussion in 'Powerboats' started by Joshua Gray, Dec 2, 2007.

  1. Joshua Gray
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Great Cranberry Island, ME

    Joshua Gray Yacht Design Student

    I am hoping that someone could provide me some advice on purchasing a boat hull. I need a boat for commuting 4 miles over the ocean year around in Maine. I did the commute last year in a seaway open outboard and realized that another season of 0 degree temps in an open boat wouldnt be pleasant.

    The boat needs to have an enclosed pilot house that could fit approx. 6 people. However I do not need any cabin because it will be a work boat only. I would prefer bulwarks all the way around. This would be safer when moving floats, boats, and working ropes. The boat needs to cruise at about 20 knots. I was thinking gasoline engine because a diesel wouldnt heat up until half my commute was over.

    The boat I am most considering is a Duffy 26'. What is people's opinion on a semi-planing vs. deep v-hull? I like to buy a bare hull and design and build the remainder of the boat myself. Anyones opinion on this subject is appreciated.
    Josh
     
  2. masalai
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Location: cruising, Australia

    masalai masalai

    First, I dont think coastguard would smile on boat-pooling (as in car-pooling) unless you hold appropriate tickets. Else Just yourself. Check with local (USA/Maine) water authorities.
     
  3. Joshua Gray
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Great Cranberry Island, ME

    Joshua Gray Yacht Design Student

    Reply

    Well it is for the workers at my boatyard and I wouldnt be charging them so no problem with the coast guard. I am considering getting my six passenger lisence though and possibly running the boat in the summer as a water taxi.
     
  4. masalai
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    masalai masalai

    Onya Josh,

    The post came on my notifications list. Out of my field, but posted to stick my nose where not necessary. Good luck in your search.
     
  5. Joshua Gray
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    Joshua Gray Yacht Design Student

    no problem
     
  6. marshmat
    Joined: Apr 2005
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    Location: Ontario

    marshmat Senior Member

    Duffy boats (if we're thinking of the same company here.... the ones made by Atlantic Boat Company, http://www.atlanticboat.com/duffy26.php and not the Texas-based electrics) do seem to be known as decent, all-around working craft. Not particularly fancy, but very practical- the minivans of the sea, if you will.
    To do 20 knots in a 26-footer I think you will be looking at a full planing hull and not a semi-displacement type.
     
  7. longliner45
    Joined: Dec 2005
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    longliner45 Senior Member

    duffy makes a great down easter,,,,seen em work in some rough weather
     
  8. Joshua Gray
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Great Cranberry Island, ME

    Joshua Gray Yacht Design Student

    Atlantic boats say they will do 20 kt cruise with 260 HP. We store one of these boats at the yard and when I picked it up it seemed to be doing about those speeds. Does it seem practical to design a workboat type pilot house for a duffy semi-planing hull and forgo the cabin. I was thinking of moving the windshield quite far forward to around station 3. Also to have several foot high bulwarks all the way around instead of the normal lobster boat deck. I have sometimes wondered why the traditional maine lobster boat has a cabin. It often has an engine and dry exhaust enclosed in it but then the rest of the space is essentially useless.
     
  9. charmc
    Joined: Jan 2007
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    Location: FL, USA

    charmc Senior Member

    The lobster boat type has been well proven in Maine waters, so it should make a good commuter. Give a lot of weight to Longliner's endorsement. He spent a number of years commercial fishing offshore of New England. He knows boats suited to that area.

    Whether space is "useless" or useful is a personal judgement. Since the majority of lobster boats have cabins, there is probably a good reason why. Those 0 degree temps might be one. Passengers might prefer being below in a cabin to sharing a crowded pilot house. Lobstermen sometimes stay out most of the day, anchor for a while to await a tide change, avoid heavy currents, wait out a blow when caught a bit far from home, etc. etc. One guy I know takes his young son with him when he can. It's a great bonding experience, but the youngster sometimes gets tired and naps in the cabin. My point is that you should realize that building a boat without things that most of that design have will make it unusual, perhaps single purpose. That may affect resale possibilities and value. On the other hand, if you know for a fact that her use will be single purpose and you plan on keeping her for many years and don't want any compromise in design, then customize her all you want. Neither is good or bad, just recognize that each has pluses and minuses. The Duffy hull does seem like a good basis.
     
  10. Kay9
    Joined: Oct 2006
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    Kay9 1600T Master

    C-dory makes a great boat for this purpose and is very fuel efficent.
     
  11. Joshua Gray
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Great Cranberry Island, ME

    Joshua Gray Yacht Design Student

    I guess "useless" was maybe the wrong word. What I meant is that it seems that a lot of larger lobster boats 36' and up have a split wheelhouse (allowing for somewhere warm) along with the engine under the platform (on a built down boat). By elimanating the cabin space it seems that you could vastly increase the amount of work space available on the platform. This space is invaluable for hauling traps back and forth to set and for working the traps if you are running strings. I understand, however, that some fisherman need the cabin and the accomadation provided for trips offshore.

    I was think of building a boat that looked somewhat more like a pilot boat. Does anyone know of anything like this being made? Thank you for the replies so far.
    Josh
     
  12. Pericles
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    Location: The heights of High Wycombe, not too far from Rive

    Pericles Senior Member

  13. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Just be sure to copy the local fish & lobster folks and use a keel cooler and dry stack exhaust.

    Otherwise you will be winterizing daily.

    We have a 50 ft Navy utility , which works fine , as it can be USCG licensed to carry about 65 (instead of the 150+ the USN packed in. Slow speeds 8k are under 3gph , 12K is 12GPh.

    FF
     
  14. Joshua Gray
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    Location: Great Cranberry Island, ME

    Joshua Gray Yacht Design Student

    Sounds like a nice boat. The thing about the dry exhaust is that I really would like to avoid the noise. I was think of setting up a system so that I could have a hydraulic ram that would serve as a stop valve on the raw water intake hose . Once that was closed I could open a second valve that would go to a 5 gallon antifreeze tank. Then just run about a half gallon through the engine to anti-freeze it. It would be easier then having to shut the seacock and putting anti-freeze in the strainer.
    However, this system seems a little overly complicated. Yet I am unable to find an alternative besides the keel cooler/ dry exhaust combo. Have you heard of anyone using any other kind of system?
    Josh
     

  15. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    "The thing about the dry exhaust is that I really would like to avoid the noise."

    NO PROBLEM,, just forget about using a cheap truck muffler and google "Hospital Critical mufflers."

    Sure its a hundred pounds and a grand , but you can talk beside the exhaust.

    There are even different grades , so you can select the quiet level you will pay for.
    While your complex system MIGHT work , IF someone forgets , its off to the Wreckers for another block , manifold, sea water pump, etc.

    I'd prefer to simply tie up and walk away.

    FF
     
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