Advice on 20ft beachcat design and build

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by Philippe Lapere, Apr 29, 2021.

  1. Philippe Lapere
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 7, Points: 3
    Location: South Africa

    Philippe Lapere Junior Member

    Update pics:
    upload_2021-10-5_15-13-34.png

    upload_2021-10-5_15-14-19.png

    Question: when I laminate the 1 layer of 160 gsm fibreglass onto the PVC sheets (pic below), I get a resin:fibreglass ratio of between 2:1, and 2.3:1, no matter how frugally I use the resin - there are even some underwetted areas on the sheet - should I be using more resin, or is there something else I should do? thanks
    upload_2021-10-5_15-25-9.png
     
  2. redreuben
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 1,948
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    Location: South Lake Western Australia

    redreuben redreuben

    You should not have underwetted areas that is no good, I’m assuming your worrying about going above 1:1 ?
    Don’t be, lots of resin is used wetting out the foam pores.
    Hand laying will never get close to infusion type ratios, keeping it lean is desirable but dry at the cost of resin use is false economy.
     
  3. trip the light fandango
    Joined: Apr 2018
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    Location: Rhyll Phillip Island Victoria Australia

    trip the light fandango Senior Member

    If you use a mixture of microballoons and work it into the surface of the PVC first, you can cut down on the absorption rate of the resin .
     
  4. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Works, but don't make the microballons too thick.
     
  5. Philippe Lapere
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 7, Points: 3
    Location: South Africa

    Philippe Lapere Junior Member

    Ok thanks, I'll ignore the ratio and wet out correctly - I'll get myself a vaccuum machine in future, for the actual 20ft cat where the strength will be more critical
     
  6. Philippe Lapere
    Joined: Aug 2018
    Posts: 16
    Likes: 7, Points: 3
    Location: South Africa

    Philippe Lapere Junior Member

    Interestingly (to me at least lol), I recently discovered that a Solcat 18's rudder crossbar is ahead of the mainsheet, so there's no need to swing the extension around the back each time you tack or gybe (which I don't enjoy doing on my hobie 16) - do you reckon it'll be a handful to swing around the front, maybe requiring a telescopic extension to get the required length when trapezing? That might negate some of the convenience then
    upload_2021-10-26_16-28-51.png

     
  7. upchurchmr
    Joined: Feb 2011
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    Location: Ft. Worth, Tx, USA

    upchurchmr Senior Member

    On my Tornado, I always wanted 2 tillers, one for each side so I didn't have to swing the tiller.
    Never did it for lack of funds.
     

  8. Windward 54
    Joined: Jan 2022
    Posts: 7
    Likes: 0, Points: 1
    Location: Newport Beach, California

    Windward 54 Junior Member

    Malibu Outrigger Canoe
    We were gifted a 1950's Malibu Outrigger Canoe #194 in poor condition and currently starting a complete resolution on her. We'd like any feedback available, we are listeners.
    For phase one of our restoration we are sail Testing her to eliminate some of the past Malibu Outrigger Canoe issues such as;
    Light air tacking
    Ocean swell submarining
    Crew weight distribution
    Rigging systems
    We raced a C-Scow on Lake Arrowhead, California for 20 years and surprisingly find the Melges C-Scow and Malibu Outrigger Canoe to be very similar. We plan to buy all our hardware for our MOC #194 "VARUA" ( Hawaiian for SPIRIT) through Melges
    https://melges.com/melges-c-scow/ (Melges C -Scow)
    https://shop.melges.com/product-category/melges-c-scow/ ( C - Scow hardware link)
    The C - Scow and MOC similarities are ;
    • Same size sail so we plan to use a C Scow sail I have for testing. This is a very powerful sail and pushes a 600 pound C-Scow @ 15 to 20 knots, on a reach in 15 knots of pressure.
    • The Scow Boom is the same size as a MOC and the Melges Gooseneck will work perfectly. https://shop.melges.com/product/mel...-scow/melges-c-scow-gooseneck-with-fasteners/
    • Scow Outhaul and Vang systems are engineered to preform in 30 knots +. We'll use this hardware.
    • For the mainsheet we'll use the same hardware. Melges sells a Harkin ratchet block so perfect, you don't need a mainsheet cleat.
    • The pressure on the C-Scow and MOC rigging are so similar, we plan to use all the same model blocks, line, cleats and other hardware Melges incorporates in their S-Cow.
    • All spars ,blades, hull decks will be varished and LP Sinka Spruce. Sitka Spruce | The Wood Database - Lumber Identification (Softwood) https://www.wood-database.com/sitka-spruce/
    • For the Gaff Gooseneck, we'll use the Melges Gooseneck.
    • Rudder hardware we'll use
    • Mast top we'll use
    • All control lines will lead back to the skippers control box
    • We plan to test sail VARUA in her original condition over the next 6 months correcting the MOC's design issues as we're sail testing.
    • After testing VARUA, we'll give her a full restoration and splash a mold off VARUA to build a fiberglass One Design Malibu Outrigger Canoe.
    • We hope all this effort will help create a One Design Malibu Outrigger Canoe racing class. Today, the C-Scow One Design Class turns out 15 to 70 Scows for a summer regatta. With some hard and smart work, maybe the Malibu Outrigger Canoe will someday achieve these numbers as well. Comments? CHEERS!
    • M )R.png MOC blue Illo.gif MOC blue Illo.gif MOC blue Illo.gif Hull rigged.jpg CH] Hull rigged.jpg
     

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