Adding a jib staysail

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by captjj, Jun 24, 2013.

  1. captjj
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    captjj captjj

    I'd like to add a jib staysail to my 43' Ketch. Would it be possible to use the new hi-tech, no-stretch line rather than wire? When not in use it could be coiled at the mast. The mast is a double-walled furling so very stiff.
    My set-up would allow me to tension it with the anchor windless.
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Flying jibs used to be set with manila line. You should have no problem with the new low stretch type or rope available today.
     
  3. captjj
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    captjj captjj

    Thanks Gonzo, I guess the test will be whether I'm able to tension it enough to be useful going to weather.
     
  4. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    all of the synthic lines break down in the sun light, so it seems to me a steel wire will hold up better if it is to be always exposed. If it will be stowed out of the sunlight when not in use than a low stretch line would be fine, but I suspect it will likely be more costly.
     
  5. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Almost nobody uses steel halyards anymore. Lines last for several years with no problem. The standard braided polyester (dacron) will work fine. If you don't have a winch available to tension the halyard, use a double purchase system. That is, there is a block where the head of the sail attaches. Sweating a line will get enough tension to make the jib set properly.
     
  6. captjj
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    captjj captjj

    Sorry Gonzo,I wasn't clear. I mean to use the hi-tech line as the forestay to run the staysail up on.
     
  7. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    I have seen setups like that, but it complicates things without any major advantage. The luff line or wire on the jib is more than strong enough, all you need is a halyard to set it flying. You can then attach the foot of the jib to the windlass to tension the halyard after you make it fast. Do you want a stay to keep the jib hanked to it after you douse it or before you hoist it?
     
  8. captjj
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    captjj captjj

    ;)No, just the halyard would be fine as long as I can get enough tension. Thanks, I'll post the results after a trial.
     
  9. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    philSweet Senior Member

    It would help if you posted a sketch of the existing rig and the proposed addition with some dimensions and spar and rigging sizes.

    What is the purpose of the staysail? Is it boomed or clubbed?
     
  10. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Its possible to use a fabric inner forestay but not recomended.

    When you tack a cutter, you hold the staysail sheet as the bow of the boat passes thru the wind, castoff the genoa sheet ...staysail sheet still made fast to force rhe genoa thru the slot between inner forestay and headstay. Then you cast off the staysail sheet once the boat is on the new tack

    The inner forestay is subject to considerable chafe as the genoa sheet runs over it when you tack. A fabric stay would rapidly degrade.
     
  11. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If you use a staysail only on heavy weather to keep the boat well balanced only, it would not be a problem. It would also not get any chafe when used for long passages on the same tack. Unless you are racing, there is no need to have both headsails up when tacking.
     
  12. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    If you will be crossing oceans You should also give some thought on gear needed to pole out the staysail to windward. Full length "J" spi pole is best

    Its a versitile and fast way to sail downwind that is also easy on the autopilot
     

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  13. bpw
    Joined: May 2012
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    bpw Senior Member

    Our boat is rigged almost completely with Dynex Dux. The jib is hanked on with dyneema soft shackles and after 1500 miles in the Chilean channels we have no signs of chafe. An outer jib tacking past will be no problem, the sail will chafe before the DUX. Lot less wear on the jib as well since the DUX is smoother than wire. We have much less chafe on our main now since it lays on DUX shrouds instead of wire.

    The Dux is cheap enough and easy to replace that I wont mind if I need a new forestay every 5 years instead of 10.

    You can get sails built with dyneema luffs if you go the free flying route, but for a staysail that may be used in anger to claw off a lee shore make sure you have the ability to really crank up the luff tension.
     
  14. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    its the genoa sheet that chafes the inner forestay.
     

  15. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    If you get so much chafe by the sheet on a Dynex line, the sail would be cut through by then.
     
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