Addicted To My Motorcycle, it has to go!

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Wavewacker, Aug 21, 2010.

  1. cor
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Alaska

    cor Senior Member

    As you think about different designs I would like to point out one feature of landing crafts that people don't normally think of. If you are operating away from marinas and in locations without docks it is a lot easier to get everything in and out of the boat with a bow door/ramp. (not just your motorcycle)

    If you land on a beach and want to load or unload people, coolers, supplies, gas cans, etc you can just walk right in with them. Climbing up and over the bow of a conventional design is a pain.

    None of this applies of course at a marina.

    C.O.
    http://whatsintheshop.blogspot.com/
     

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  2. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Ooops, right, can't leave a loading ramp or anything at the boat ramp. Put the ramp out, unload, put it back, go anchor the boat/dock, walk back to bike or kayak, hide or store the kayak, take off. Still beats walking I think.

    Something that concerns me with any boat is bolting or mounting a small crane/boom and the channel for the wheels to set in. The larger the surface area on deck the better I'm sure, but seems the strongest framing would be along the gunnels or top edge of the hulls. Wonding if additional bulkheads should be built to carry the load down to throung the hull. Maybe another way would be to carry bracing over the deck and down the hull some or transom securing it along the outside. Might not look pretty, but sure wouldn't want the deck to crack....
     
  3. RonKMiller
    Joined: Sep 2010
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    Location: Tucson, AZ

    RonKMiller Junior Member

    My 1972 Trail 90 easily fits on my boat up front once the table is removed.

    You can't see them in this picture since this was prior to the completion, but there are twin 16 foot aluminum ramps that allow the trailer (and bike) to be easily loaded/unloaded. I chose the Trail 90 for many reasons - it can haul stuff, is light, narrow, bulletproof and gets about 80 mpg. While not terribly fast it meets my need for basic on shore transportation just fine. The dual range gearbox and trials tires are perfect for exploring off road as well.

    I don't think my '02 800 lb. BMW K1200Lt would work out too well....:cool:
     

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  4. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    You must be a biker too! That probably would be a great ride, trying to follow the waterways. The only problem I see is trying to cook and sleep on by bike, I'd get off to relieve myself.

    Do you think the yachties would talk to us if we walked in wearing leathers?

    The plan is to take about a year, that's a long time in a mountain tent. LOL
     
  5. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Looks like ya gotcha yur self a great little rig there, just to suit ur needs!

    A Trail 90 is a neat little bike, I had one as a young'n and had a blast with it, it will haul two up too! Today, you'd likely get killed on an interstate or freeway. I bet the Beamer would fit on there if ya tried.

    My GF has a hard enough time on the transalp on a larger cushie Corbin seat.

    I'd really like to take my Vulcan 1600 (and she would too) but I think at 720 pounds, that's asking a bit too much.

    I just would not trust toons in the ICW or along the gulf. I also see you modified your deck, as I just posted about putting a camper on a toon. :D
     

  6. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Likes: 21, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 226
    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Very convincing points. I had to carry a ladder on my cruiser to get aboard when I beached it and loading the ice chest was a pain too.

    An LC is not out of the running so to speak. My boat needs to be trailerable and a mono will have less living space I would think. I'd need 12 to 14 feet for a cabin, a standing shower and while cooking, so that higher cabin profile, while it can be done, requires the LC to be stretched out a bit. At least 8' to stow the cargo before any bow rise comes into play. I also have conserns about stability, sponsons burried in the water might do the trick and adding a little cat walk at the sides to sit on or lay on would be nice too. But now I'm pushing a pretty big boat, requires more power I would think and more fuel.

    I don't know what the difference would be compared to a power cat.

    Another plus, is that LC looks like an easier build than a large cat, well within my one year build time. With an LC, I'd probably be at 30'. Doesn't look like there are many options for in hull stowage for water, fuel, batteries, gen set and stuff. Seems that would mean making it even longer.

    But, as you say, it would be an easy on-off load and would not need a boom/crane/ramps, etc.

    Obviously it would end up being a custom build and design as a utility tri maran and Bolger style cabin off his longer sharpies.
     
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