Addicted To My Motorcycle, it has to go!

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Wavewacker, Aug 21, 2010.

  1. Wavewacker
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Springfield, Mo.

    Wavewacker Senior Member

    LOL, we posted somewhat at the same time and missed this.

    I'll take you word for it about turteling, I won't be charging up any 20 foot waves if I can help it. (at a 45 degree angle I still presume)

    Sunbeam makes a good bike, cars as well. Ahhh, the Sunbeam Tiger...

    Just a 2' depth well in a hull would work Richard. A light weight top might fit over the bike, it wouldn't all have to go below. Might be good to have tanks balanced too as the bike would not always be on the boat.

    As I mentioned above, I think there is a real market for the adventure riders who are boaters as well. If allowances were made for most 650 cc bikes it would be a big plus. The problem I see is mounting the tackle, crane/boom for the lifting required. Mine at 325 is on the heavy side of off road bikes, so if it were sufficient for 400 lbs, it would catch all similar bikes, wet, with gear.

    The Airhead is a great solution I think, never used one, but just the thought is a real gas...(lol)

    Failed to mention too my future plans would probably have some solar technology, charging 3 or 4 battries as I plan on gunkholing, not marina living and can't burn fuel 24/7....(I know it wouldn't be, just say'n self sufficient)
    LED lighting, computers, GPS, Gadgets, small TV and the biggie, AC.

    Very good on design with the windows, using black paint to design the smoked window look, I like taht, much like the Mac 26X.
     
  2. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    That would be the better way to go, many people don't understand that length is a better way to get load carrying on a multihull but when the marinas charge by the foot people tend to think small.
     
  3. spidennis
    Joined: Feb 2007
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    Location: south padre island, texas

    spidennis Chief Sawdust Sweeper

    there wouldn't be much air cooling of the motor like this
     
  4. spidennis
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    spidennis Chief Sawdust Sweeper

    ok, back to the cat idea .....

    back the cat up to the dock and use a ramp to run the bike off.
    at shore it would be more of a pain with the sharp incline.
    you'd also need your foot path next to the bike ramp,
    unless you're planning on riding it up the ramp :eek:
    personally I power the bike up a ramp while walking beside it.
     
  5. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    True, and IMO that will only be feasible on a small craft, 16', narrow efficient hulls, wide frame beam and probably sitting on the bike, It's been done with bicycles and similar craft. Diddly wanted drop wheels which was also an older idea of mine, having the trailer as the cataraft frame and using inflatable pontoons. Again. check out Jack's Plastic Welding for tubes.

    BYW, my Transalp is water cooled, but I would never consider an open system to lake/river water running through my engine, I'd keep it a closed system.

    I would think that a large prop at slow engine speeds would work best on such a conversion, don't get carried away with the power of a motorcycle transforming into a fast boat as the power band is at higher revs for the bike and I really would not my wheel turning at speeds of 60 mph to go 15 on the water////gearing ratios on your drive wheel/roller must be considered.
     
  6. cavalier mk2
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    cavalier mk2 Senior Member

    You'd have to set up that VW fan with some ducting and run it off the power shaft, but you'd get an extra alternator. Junk yard solutions may not be elegant but some people have fun with the contraptions.
     
  7. Richard Woods
    Joined: Jun 2006
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    Good point.

    Can you push your bike up a steep marina ramp at low tide? Many ramps may be too narrow to take a bike anyway. I doubt if marina owners will like you riding a 650cc bike along the docks.

    I know you said you will anchor out, but I assume you use the bike for shopping as well? and what about those places that don't have marinas, just marshy shores or private gardens? Or maybe very shallow water.

    Normally cruisers use a dinghy to get ashore, I doubt if you'll get your motorbike in one!! A push bike is no problem of course.

    I wrote elsewhere about my friend who used a Morris Minor engine, complete with gearbox and radiator, on the bridgedeck of his catamaran. He just fitted a propellor to the driveshaft where the differential went. He said having four gears was useful when motorsailing

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  8. spidennis
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    spidennis Chief Sawdust Sweeper

    so now going with the anchored or moored and docked idea ......

    I have this old thread: a cataraft for a motorcyle, up to the 650 class
    http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/boat-design/motorcycle-cataraft-ferry-16071.html

    It's been mentioned before, using a swim platform idea / dingy davits .....

    and you need a dingy anyway right?

    so make a cataraft to hold the bike like I was gonna do
    and have it strong enough to winch up to the deck of the cat like a dingy.
    then you got your landing craft dingy to get your bike ashore,
    along with with a standard dingy and a designated place to store it.

    Instead of having it recessed like I have it shown just make it a flat deck on the top which would make it much stronger and then when stowed in place it could be extra deck space, then when at anchor could be a swim platform sitting between the hulls. or could be paddle out to another location for better sun tanning or whatever. Yeah, this might be the ticket?!

    [​IMG]
     
  9. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    LOL, that's a contraption and an old minor 4 banger probably works well!

    Most of the docks I have been on are at least three feet wide, I would never buzz up or down a ramp, my feet would be somewhat down and move at walking speed or walk it, don't want some marina owner freeking out.

    Problem is too, that whileI could climb some steps, it would probably damage the step, chipping the edges if they were treated wood. There are some large decks used for docks with a ramp to a grassy area that could be used. You would really need to scout out such places from the boat to a parking lot or street. Many, if not most, would not be suitable.

    The best place would be to use a boat ramp, set it on concrete at the waters edge and ride out.

    Most loading would probably be at muddy or sandy areas on the banks of the rivers and coves.

    I have used google earth to examine the canals and ICW. Canal walls would not be a good spot, but might use a ramp. You also must consider the ride from the banks to a way out, a long fence could make for a bad day. So scouting the area has to be done before assuming you could just off load and take off.

    Along the Mississippi, the white River, Buffalo and Tenn and Kentucky there are many areas that are good to use. I know too, down in Arkansas and Louisanna where the terrain is flatter that getting on and off would not be that hard.

    Along the Great Lakes, rocky shores would be a problem, they have bolders, tuff to get over with a dual sport, so it's back tothe search for boat ramps.

    I think most towns and cities where you would go to shop, they will have a ramp.

    I plan on carrying an inflatable kayak, water shoes and a bathing suit...LOL.
    I could also allow my canoe to trail with the bow tied up on deck with the stern bouncing along or just cover it and pull it, if that was too much trouble, I could set it on top. And, I'd probably take a small sail for fun with the canoe.

    And, that's the beauty of a beachable shallow draft, not needing a dinghy.

    On the Great Loop, with the exception of the jaunt from Alabama to Florida, I should alsway be insight of land, which probably means that I can back stroke to shore in the worst case.
     
  10. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    I don't think you can leave a boat on a ramp dock while you go off for a ride. You'll need to be in a marina. I've not done the Great Loop, but I have done the ICW seven times

    Richard Woods
     
  11. spidennis
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    spidennis Chief Sawdust Sweeper

    what part of the ICW? I live at the end, or is it the beginning? way on down in Texas. They got some grand plans for the port of brownsville, new highways and such directly into the port. more barge traffic maybe for the future? and more chances of them taking out our causeway like happened on 9/15 just a few days after 9/11. we thought it was another terrorist attack ..... what? nope, just a dumb accident that killed a bunch of people.
     
  12. Richard Woods
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    Richard Woods Woods Designs

    At various times, various parts (never less than 800 miles though) from Fort Lauderdale to Norfolk and up through New York, then Long Island to Maine

    The Gulf states are the only four coastal states in the US that I haven't anchored my boat. I have been to Key West, sailed south past Cape Flattery, into Mexico from San Diego, and as far north as Bar Harbor. So I have almost been to the four corners of the US. I have also sailed in Alaska and PR, but not Hawaii

    Richard Woods of Woods Designs

    www.sailingcatamarans.com
     
  13. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    I have given consideration to the issue as well and leaving your boat in front of a ramp is a good way to make sure you don't see it again.

    Seems to me that along most of the northern riverways, in civilization it would be best to plan where you were going to leave the boat first, near a take off point for any bike tour. Finding a marina with a ramp is option A. Rent a slip for thre or four days, off load and put the boat under protective eyes of those in the marina. Seems the most prudent way of doing it in most places.

    Along the coast (Texas isn't on the Great Loop) but is still an area to shoot over to, there are inlets and again marinas to rent.

    On the lower Mississippi, you can get off the beaten path and go in along the Buffalo and White River in Arkansas. Lots of sand bars and banks to unload, probably best to follow the state parks and again use a marina or pull up where people can watch the boat.

    There are also some areas in La and AL, where you can simply hide, you can go into hide in shallow waters. Again, there are the locals, especially gator hunters and they are good folks and most like bikes and boats. Making friends, they will probably keep an eye on the boat.

    You need to be able to secure the boat to keep honest people honest, maybe put the OB in the hole and lock it, if the plan is to be gone a couple days.

    Most rides would be a day cruise. You can gunkhole and leave the bike locked up in sight but in remote areas.

    Up in the northern areas, as I said, most trips would be a day out and leave the bike ashore, staying a couple days in a marina or on a ball.

    There is a bit of logistics involved and determining how long you stay, where to stay and where to keep the bike after unloading it. With Locks of Luck, everything should go well.

    Hopefully too, the loading would not be so bad or time consuming that it would cause you not to enjoy the trips.

    Now, I have a party to attend and need to get ready.....

    I'm taking the Giants and giving 3 points, excet to Dan W, its double or nothing for him from his loss on the playoffs, LOL..

    Enjoy the game....and I'll be back later////

    Thanks everyone!!
     
  14. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    Wow, 21 to 17, I'm happy! LOL Ya all pay up! LOL
     

  15. eyschulman
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    eyschulman Senior Member

    Simple answer leave the boats home you all get together and ride the bikes around the loop. Much better miles per gallon that way. When you get to the bar you can talk boats all night.
     
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