Actual Design Question

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by CatBuilder, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    bntii, those are nicely done renderings.
     
  2. bntii
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    bntii Senior Member

    Thanks Hoyte- quick and dirty but it gets space fleshed out.
     
  3. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    Catbuilder, the circles are 10" dinner plates showing you can plate for six. Forward of the case is the pantry. I drew bifold doors, but since only crew go down those stairs, you wouldn't need them. If most of the cooking gets done when the guests are off on an excursion and the meals are largely preorganized, the walk around to the pantry isn't a big deal- just grab the box marked "Wednesday". If you tend to work from bulk supplies, it would be a pain.
     
  4. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    One other thought. If the cook is less than 6' tall, you might raise the floor a bit in the galley. That gives you better tankage under, and a bit more room at countertop level. I'm talking 3" or so. You can tell her you did it so she can see out the porthole better.
     
    Last edited: Apr 11, 2011
  5. bus_labi
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    bus_labi New Member

    John Shuttleworth uses single board on cruising boats and claims loss of 1-1.5% pointing ability - a reasonable compromise for happier chef/wife :)
     
  6. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    But this is about a happier Catbuilder, whom we should trust to be capable of motivating his crew:D (I thought of that too, and so did cthippo, albeit subconsciously)
    how about this- Keep the board, lose the porthole- and the appliances. Refrigerate the entire space and advertise vegan cruises. You're bound to make more money with your wife working the bar, teaching the vegans how to drink and selling them Snickers bars when nobodys looking.

    (this is why I'm not in business)
     
  7. Tad
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    Tad Boat Designer

    You guys are paying attention to the structural issues, right? Like a bulkhead in the original arrangement that is supporting the main chainplate and or the daggerboard case...........I would bet every piece of joinery in the original design is a hull skin support and must be replaced with something offering equal support....
     
  8. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    Is that going to be true with foam core construction?

    The main bulkhead at the forward end of the galley hasn't moved, though the position of the door within it may.
     
  9. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    I don't mean to keep butting heads with you, but... here we go. ;)

    Bulkheads need to be 8' on center... that's what's required. However, I personally will see to it that there is a hat section bulkhead on one side of the board case and something solid on the other side, just because that's an extra step above and beyond I would like to do. It also helps me get that 8' on center done more easily.

    I hate to argue, but this makes a couple posts in a couple days where you have interjected your thoughts about something you don't have firsthand knowledge about, but that I do... those thoughts turning out to be wrong.

    And... I hate to be "that guy", but could you point out where the bulkhead supporting the chainplate is?
     
  10. keysdisease
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    keysdisease Senior Member

    Yes, I was suggesting the no way no how choice.

    You could bulkhead at the trunk and use the inboard space for cupboards, reefer, whatever and the outboard space for the head like in the other hull. This gives you the space from the daggerboard trunk to the aft cabin for galley without having to figure out a way to work around a space 15" wide. Seperate stairways forward for guest and aft for galley / crew.

    BTW, I like any idea with a pass through, that way you may have to bend over in the salon to grab whatever but at least you don't have to carry trays and stuff up and down stairs.

    But seems like a case of .......never mind

    Steve



     
  11. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Yeah, the layout makes sense that way... I hear you. It would be much easier, but the stress levels tend to go way up chartering when you can't get your sleep. So... I have to have the forward cabin as a priority, to get away from where most of the noise comes from at night.

    See... charter guests are amazing. They have a lot of energy.

    They'll stay up until 12AM yelling and drinking outside, then want me to sail at 6AM to someplace that takes all day to get to. Once we arrive, and I anchor, they then want me to take them ashore so they can go out to dinner.

    Meanwhile, my wife will have had to prepare all their meals, from doing dishes at 9PM after dinner, to breakfast at 6AM departure, to lunch underway and snacks all along the way.

    If you don't get your rest chartering, it costs you in terms of lost charter (because you need time off) or just in terms of your mental health and burnout.

    Those are the personal reasons I need to be forward - away from the guests.


     
  12. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    And you enjoy doing this why exactly?

    I promise if I could ever afford to charter with you I would let you get plenty of sleep. I'd just want to drive :p
     
  13. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Catbuilder,
    yeah baby, been there, done that. Old Cass Gidley of the Alden designed YO-HO-HO used to get up at 3 am and be half way to the next spot by the time the charter party was awake. They'd come up an over-canvassed 50 foot Marconi sloop sailing fast under beautiful Mexican skies, a great breakfast, and somebody telling them what exactly they were doing next that was much cooler than anything they could have imagined.
    They could argue, cajole, suggest, flirt, it was all the same. A smiling skipper, firmly in charge, with smooth plans for the whole week that were pretty awesome, based around the charter party going home happy.
     
  14. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Uh... it's a living. That's the only reason. :D

    Otherwise, there are probably a million other things one could do that would be better work.

    Well, CtHippo, if you are ever on the east coast, you are welcome to come out for a spin (daysail) on this boat, since you took an active part in her design and construction.

    You're welcome to take the helm too.
     

  15. philSweet
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    philSweet Senior Member

    You don't suppose the USCG inspector will demand that the board to hull joint can be easily inspected, do you? My earlier layout would be pretty much toast if he did. Depends what he decides is easy, I guess.
     
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