Actual Design Question

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by CatBuilder, Apr 7, 2011.

  1. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

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  2. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    It should have 4 heads, but I'm skipping the one for that aft cabin.

    Remember, Hoyt... this is my job, not my hobby. If it were up to me, I'd have a smaller, more simple boat, but I have to earn a living.

    A 36 foot cat with two staterooms, one head and a galley would be all I'd need if I didn't have to work.
     
  3. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Once you come up with some good ideas that seem to work on paper, be sure to spend real time and money to mock it all up with tape, 1/8" ply, cardboard, whatever, to a pretty high standard. Then bend, reach, open lockers and really think about what it's like during a jumpy afternoon passage with hungry guests grumbling overhead and can your food prep and delivery sequence work smoothly day after day. This test will bring a bunch of changes and should give a good result.
     
  4. Lurvio
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    Lurvio Mad scientist

    A quick sketch.

    [​IMG]

    If you have time the fridge/freezer could be fabricated to the boat, an of the self unit will waste a lot of space being a box that they are.

    Lurvio
     
  5. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    If your cooking with electricity get an induction cook top and a combo microwave, convection oven.

    Fit the galley with a fixed coffee maker and a fixed Crock pot slow cooker that can run off the inverter....silently ...while sailing .

    Put plenty of AC outlets in the galley for toaster...blender..... permanently mount the devices.

    I never use the Freezer. If you feel you must have a freezer, go small , then make the refrigeration locker space huge. Fruits vegetables, cheeses, bread take up alot of space ...all need to be chilled for long...two week.. life.

    Build in a third drinks reefer..make it HUGE. One case water, one case soft drink, one case wine, one case beer....

    Build in an efficient , large, food preparation work top area. On charter most meal preparation is not cooking, its getting the grub plated and on deck to the punters .....make access to plates and cutlery easy and ample....twice as much cutlery, glasses..... space that you think you need.

    Double sink with a good drying rack for dishes.

    Install a ventilation system in the galley....pay particular attention to the oven. A hot oven will overheat the boat for hours. Install a separate , whisper quite, low power drain , low volume, DC computer fan type extractor for the oven chassis.




    A charter boat runs on a fixed menu. The Fixed Menu is the seven recipes that your chef likes to cook . Ask you chef for input.
     
  6. cthippo
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    cthippo Senior Member

    OK, couple of ideas...

    This is the more conventional design:

    [​IMG]

    And this is, I think, based on my expeirence working in the galley's of cruise ships, a better idea:

    [​IMG]

    The second design allows for more pantry space, and alloes you to do your plating on the side nearer the dining space, while a pass-through window means you're not trying to carry loaded plates up and down the stairs. I'm not sure if moving the weighty stuff (stoves, sinks, fridge) outboard is going to cause weight and balance problems, but it will make venting easier.

    EDIT: Where are you going to store garbage?
     

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  7. bntii
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    bntii Senior Member

    I retract my noise on seeing cthippo's sensible design #2 above.
    Perhaps only shuffling the location of the various appliances along the outboard side.
    Well done.
     
  8. hoytedow
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Cthippo's #2 is better because stress on leeboard would be more toward starboard, necessitating bracing toward rail, more than toward CL.
     
  9. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    I think on these designs both leeboards stay down pretty much all the time when sailing on the wind so the strain could be both ways depending on tack, though the lee hull's board is probably the most strained by being buried so you're probably right, galley counter is structural and takes largest compressive load of top of C/B case and transfers it to outboard side of hull.
     
  10. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Cthippo: Thanks. I love it. Only issue is that I am not inclined to make a major structural change to the hull (like relocating the dagger board).

    Moving the trunks is bad. That will completely screw up the hydrodynamics of the boat. There are centers of effort on those boards that resist leeway when going to weather. Those have to match up properly with the CE's on the rudders and the sails to make sure the boat sails properly. Otherwise, you end up with bad lee or weather helm and an unstable boat - that can do close to 20 knots. Scary! :)

    I'd have to incorporate the dagger board trunk into your second design.

    I think eliminating a set of stairs is a great idea to gain more room. Also, the chef (wife) has said she's like to face outboard while cooking, needs counter space right next to the stovetop/oven, wants a window to look out (while facing outboard) and wants ample counter space next to the sink for a drying rack for dishes.

    So, to meet her requirements as well, I'd just shuffle a few appliances around (like move sink inboard). And find a way to make the space behind the daggerboard (inboard of it?) useful.
     
  11. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Cat, I don't think he removed them. I think he just didn't illustrate them, assuming them to be stationary.
     
  12. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    He didn't *re* move them, but he did move them. :D

    In #1 it is moved behind the sink and stove.

    In #2 it is also behind the sink and stove, far outboard.

    At least it appears that way... could be wrong. Cthippo?
     
  13. Lurvio
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    Lurvio Mad scientist

    Another sketch

    [​IMG]

    Dotted line beside sink is overhead cabinet for plates etc. Inboard side desk has overhead cabinets also. I couldn't find use for the space across the stairs, so the aft cabin got it's own head. :p

    Lurvio
     
  14. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    One thing for sure...the cat youre building is a very complex boat with many systems.

    Space..to make these systems function correctly and be serviceable will be challenging.

    Details like the cooker ? If its a gimballed cooker oven combo, you have failed to give it enough swing room...it must be moved further inboard or a bump must be moulded into the hull. .

    How will the sinks drain ? into a grey tank or overboard ? Sinks like to be inboard...near center line, regardless of grey tank or overboard discharge. .

    What is under the galley cabin sole ? Tankage, machinery , storage ?

    What is the useful hull beam ?

    The space forward of the galley looks underutilized ? What is its function ? I would use it for food storage, galley storage to generate maximum work space in the galley.

    can the primary refrigerated storage be moved to deck house level ?

    And whats the story with a daggerboard ? It takes up huge space. Is it necessary or is it a performance option ? I ask because I recently saw a very fine Cat designed by Van Peteghem Lauriot Prevost....no dagger board...full length false keels with props protected. Its owner told me that the boat sails very well.
     

  15. CatBuilder

    CatBuilder Previous Member

    Thank you, everyone.

    Great thread and a lot of great ideas. I think the general layout is pretty well determined at this point.

    Michael: I forgot to thank you for your initial post in this thread. Instead of thanking you, I sent it straight off to the cook and got input from it. I have been away from chartering for a couple years and it was great to see your post and really get those ideas flowing again.

    I'm going to answer your post here below, in Red... read down...

     
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