Acceptable minimum spacing between moored buoys

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by floating, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. floating
    Joined: Jun 2009
    Posts: 65
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NJ

    floating Junior Member

    Are there any rules or guidelines for how close buoys can be placed? These are large NDBC-style moored buoys, rather than buoys intended to moor ships. The scenario is multiple adjacent buoys, each with a 3-leg mooring, deployed for a long time (must withstand 100-year storm). I would imagine guidelines would seek to prevent fouling with adjacent buoys or a servicing vessel coming to deploy/inspect/service a buoy in the group. I am also wondering what damage scenario I should assume (1 mooring leg broken, 2 intact?)

    If you know of any relevant guidelines (DNV, marine experience) that govern how close buoys can be placed, please let me know.
     
    Last edited: Jun 22, 2015
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 14,472
    Likes: 646, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    The spacing depends on the length of the vessels which will be moored.
     
  3. AndySGray
    Joined: Jun 2014
    Posts: 296
    Likes: 13, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 91
    Location: Cayman

    AndySGray Senior Member

    Changes to the original post now makes the original reply (below) seem out of context;-


    Remember that even 'Permanent' moorings need to be dived at least annually and thoroughly inspected, also after a storm.

    Unfortunately, you can't assume that all boats in a set of moorings will do the same thing, motor vessels with more superstructure and wind-age will head to wind much more and sailing boats (at anchor) will to a greater extent turn into the waves and current.

    Local practices vary too, round here we typically tie to a mooring ball using a bridle arrangement and the buoy may be 15 foot ahead of the boat which all adds to the 'swing'.

    Contact your local insurance company, they may have their own recommendations - failing to check that could create issues.
     
    Last edited: Jun 23, 2015
  4. JSL
    Joined: Nov 2012
    Posts: 792
    Likes: 53, Points: 28, Legacy Rep: 41
    Location: Delta BC

    JSL Senior Member

    May be a dumb question but......Are you talking about moored buoys or mooring buoys?
     
  5. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,743
    Likes: 347, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

    Get a copy of Buoy Engineering by Berteaux from Woods Hole.
     
    1 person likes this.
  6. floating
    Joined: Jun 2009
    Posts: 65
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: NJ

    floating Junior Member

    Buoy which is moored

    These are NDBC-style buoys which are moored, rather than a buoy which ships can moor to. Have updated the original post.
     
  7. Ike
    Joined: Apr 2006
    Posts: 2,389
    Likes: 268, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 1669
    Location: Washington

    Ike Senior Member


  8. jehardiman
    Joined: Aug 2004
    Posts: 2,743
    Likes: 347, Points: 83, Legacy Rep: 2040
    Location: Port Orchard, Washington, USA

    jehardiman Senior Member

    NDBC deep sea buoys are usually single point moored with watch circles on the order of 1/5 to 1/3 the water depth. And they are not very robust above their needs (a notable function of deep water buoys where the weight of the ground tackle is extreme), many are lost when vessels tie off to them.

     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.