ABYC definition of 'small craft'

Discussion in 'Class Societies' started by Alik, Aug 13, 2011.

  1. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Trying to find official definition of small craft that is used in ABYC standards. Any recommendations? Is it just pleasure craft <24m, or there is specific reference?
     
  2. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

  3. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Most rules/reg's would state their definitions at the beginning. Does the ABYC not?
     
  4. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    I don't have a copy of ABYC standards available, but I believe the applicability depends on the particular standard. A summay of the standards and what each is applicable to can be found at http://www.abycinc.org/standards/purpose.cfm
     
  5. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    I have CD with their standards and there is no definition, not in the beginning or through search. That's why I am surprised and asking :)
     
  6. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    I am not an expert on ABYC standards, and probably know just enough to be dangerous. So what follows may be incorrect in places, but perhaps someone more knowledgable than I will correct it.

    Here is my understanding about ABYC standards.

    ABYC is a private, non-profit association. It is not a classification society. From the ABYC website: The American Boat & Yacht Council, ABYC, was created in 1954 as a non-profit organization to develop safety standards for the design, construction, equipage, repair and maintenance of boats of less than 150 feet. http://www.abycinc.org/

    ABYC standards are not a classification rule. Rather they are a collection of individual standards which have been established by the boat building industry in the US and Canada over the years as recommended, good practices for various aspects and equipment of boats.

    ABYC itself has no legal authority. It is perfectly legal to build and sell a boat in the US which does not meet ABYC standards as long as it meets the applicable Federal/US Coast Guard standards, and state standards if any. I do not know to what extent ABYC members are expected to follow ABYC standards in the boats they build.

    It is possible for legal authorities to adopt an ABYC standard as a legal standard. I believe Canada has done this for certain standards. Also, Peter Eikenberry ("Ike") has said that a boat builder selling boats in the US market would be wise to follow ABYC standards in case they are sued for building a defective boat. If they have followed the ABYC standards they can then use the defense that they were following industry standards. There may also be very valid reasons to not follow ABYC standards in some instances.

    ABYC standards specify when they apply. Some standards specify what boats they are applicable to or do not apply to. In other cases they apply to any boats with particular features or equipment. If a naval architect/designer wants a boat to be designed to ABYC standards then they need to look at the applicability of each standard and decide if that particular standard applies to the boat they are designing. No boat would have all standards apply to it.

    Examples taken from http://www.abycinc.org/standards/purpose.cfm

    H-4 — Cockpit Drainage Systems
    This standard is a guide for the definition, design, and construction of cockpit drainage systems.
    This standard applies to all boats with cockpits.

    H-5 — Boat Load Capacity
    This standard is a guide for determining the load capacity of boats.
    This standard applies to all boats less than 26 feet in length, including catamarans.
    EXCEPTIONS:
    Personal watercraft
    Canoes and kayaks. (See ABYC H-29, "Canoes and Kayaks.")
    Inflatable boats. (See ABYC H-28, "Inflatable Boats.")
    Pontoon boats. (See ABYC H-35, "Powering and Load Capacity of Pontoon Boats.")

    H-22 (ANS) — Electric Bilge Pump Systems
    These standards are guides for the design, construction, installation, operation, and control of electric bilge pump systems.
    These standards apply to all boats equipped with electric bilge pump systems intended for control of spray, rain water, and normal accumulation of water due to seepage and spillage.
    EXCEPTIONS:
    Pumps intended for damage control.
    Damage control systems.

    P-6 (ANS) — Propeller Shafting Systems
    This standard is a guide for the design, construction and materials for propeller shafts and struts, and the installation of shaft bearings, stern bearings, struts, shaft seals, shaft logs, shaft couplings, and propellers.
    This standard applies to all boats driven by propeller shafting systems that penetrate the hull.

    H-37 — Jet Boats - Light Weight
    This standard is a guide for the design, construction, and maintenance of inboard jet propelled boats.
    This standard applies to inboard water jet powered boats less than 20 feet in length with a boat weight less than 3000 lbs. (910 kg).
    EXCEPTION:
    Personal watercraft.
    Inflatable boats and RIBS covered under ABYC H-28, Inflatable Boats.

    H-41 (ANS) — Reboarding Means, Ladders, Handholds, Rails, and Lifelines
    This standard is a guide for the design, construction, and installation of reboarding means, ladders, handhold devices, grab rails, rails, lifelines, and slip resistant surfaces.
    This standard applies to all boats.
    EXCEPTION:
    Manually propelled boats
    Aquatic toys
    Canoes, kayaks, or other boats with a beam less than 3.6 ft (1.1 m)

    P-22 — Steering Wheels
    This standard is a guide for the design, construction, and installation of steering wheels for marine applications.
    This standard applies to steering wheels up to and including 24 inches (61 cm) in diameter used with outboard engines, inboards, sterndrives, and water jet drives.
     
  7. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    OK, say H-41 on deck safety
    'This standard applies to all boats...'
    Does it also apply to yachts over 24m? Evidently it does not because for those bulwark/lifelines should be 1000mm high. Does it also apply to commercial high-speed craft craft, say 23m in length? Evidently does not, as those rules require rescue boat or lifting device to recover unconscious person from water, for re-boarding.

    If we take appropriate ISO standard, it clearly says - for boats not exceeding 24m (some types are excluded) in length, mostly pleasure craft.

    So as I understand there is no clear definition of 'small craft' in ABYC. The reason I am asking is: I am making comparison table of different safety requirements that affect design/styling of boats, for marine design conference in September.
     
  8. Ad Hoc
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    Ad Hoc Naval Architect

    Alik

    I no nothing about the ABYC. But upon inspection..it appears to be a collection of "good practice" for building, ie like a survyors/builders guide, and not a design code as such.
     
  9. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Their new standards are based on ISO Small Craft. But area of application is a question. I was a member of ABYC and understand that there is no official status in those rules.
     
  10. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    If an applicable legal standard is more stringent in an area than an ABYC standard then the legal standard has to be met. Meeting an ABYC standard by itself is not an alternative to meeting an applicable legal standard. Likewise for a boat which is being built to a classification rule. If the classification rule is more stringent in a particular area then it needs to be met in that area.

    So let's look at bulwarks/lifelines for yachts over 24m. If there is a legal standard or classification rule requirement that yachts over 24m have bulwarks/lifelines 1000mm high then that requirement needs to be followed even if the ABYC standard calls for less.
     
  11. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    This is not the way to use standards... There should be clear applicability range, so designer can reference it directly not looking into other rules if they are more strict.
     
  12. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    That is because ABYC does not have standards but recommendations.
     
  13. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    It clearly says 'ABYC standards' on CD...
     
  14. DCockey
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    DCockey Senior Member

    If a boat will be sold in the US then the builder has to ensure that the boat meets all applicable US Federal/Coast Guard requirements, irregardless of any other set of standards the boat is built to. So even if ISO standards or any other standards are followed the builder has to make sure the boat meets the Federal/Coast Guard requirements.
     

  15. Alik
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    Alik Senior Member

    Well, now You know why I need it - for table of standards application in my paper. Good about ABYC CD is that they include appropriate CFR and USCG regulations, as separate section. But question on applicability of their owns still remains open.
     
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