About landing crafts

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by karayelhb, Sep 15, 2011.

  1. karayelhb
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    karayelhb New Member

    Hi everybody!

    I am doing some research about landing crafts especially in their hull forms. But I couldn't find any good resource to describe the philosophy of these boats. Could you please help me if you know any book, webpage, etc.

    Baris
     
  2. tunnels

    tunnels Previous Member

    You meaning landing craft as used by the armed services during the wars or coastal and lake landing craft use today ?? principle will be the same just differant cargo , Google landing craft !!:idea: Wow theres a ton of stuff came up !!
     
  3. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    The 'philosophy' is they have to be able to drop their loading/unloading ramp near enough to the water's edge so stuff can get on/off without too many dramas.
     
  4. Village_Idiot
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    Village_Idiot Senior Member

    IIRC, the original landing craft were Higgins boats and used at Normandy. The boat was designed/built by Higgins who grew up on the shallow Platte River near Columbus, NE. The boats were big and heavy and relativly shallow for surf work (they still drafted 4 feet at the stern).

    Modern landing craft can draft 2 feet at the stern, depending on where their use is intended. Ocean/surf craft still need some depth for better ocean-going performance (see bill munson's boats), whereas inland lakes/river craft can get away with shallower design and operation.

    Attached is a pic of a modern aluminum landing craft designed for inland waters. It is 26'x12', diesel w/ Hamilton jet, loaded with 5.5 tons cargo it drafts 9 inches at the front and 22 inches at the rear.
     

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  5. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    If you are researching landing craft and such, you might also be interested in the "Alligator" built during WW2 by FMC corporation. They were butt ugly amphibious boxes with track propulsion. Sometimes used as smaller armed landing craft.
     
  6. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    I've had quite a bit of practice with the Higgins LCVP (Landing Craft for Vehicles and Personnel) and this is one tough boat that could operate in 18" of water.
    http://www.higginsmemorial.com/design.asp
     
  7. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Draft 3' aft but could get off a beach if it had 18" at stern.
     
  8. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

  9. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

  10. BATAAN
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    BATAAN Senior Member

    Basic idea is very shallow draft to get on/off a beach with little gradient, tunnel stern, strong enough build to take violent battering, enough Vee to give some speed without pounding, a bow ramp to allow roll on/off use and enough power to stay out of trouble. What else is there? For philosophy of landing craft, read about Mr Higgins.
     
  11. FMS
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    FMS Senior Member

    A different landing craft: L-CAT landing catamaran
    http://www.naval-technology.com/contractors/patrol/cnim/

     
  12. cor
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    cor Senior Member

    Here is a landing craft on the small end of the spectrum. 21' long, built from plywood, 90 hp outboard. Sized to haul two ATVs or about 2000 pounds of cargo.

    C.O.
     

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  13. BMcF
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    BMcF Senior Member

  14. Wavewacker
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    Wavewacker Senior Member

    That looks like a good starting point. What about having a couple cat hulls on each side and a small cabin at the rear for access to the cat hulls and the helm? The flat bottom LC would need a stronger bottom since it would be off the water I would think.
     

  15. ACuttle
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    ACuttle Marine Design Engineer

    Cat hulls make pretty poor small (<8m) landing craft. Though they've got the deck area, the height needed to clear the wetdeck means your load-deck is pretty high and the ramp needs to be so much longer to give a sensible angle.

    If the wetdeck doesn't clear the water there is the same strength problem. In either case bottom strength isn't too much of an issue typically, as stiffening up flat pannels isn't too hard and shell thickness is pretty high up forward for when you ground out - especially as many landing craft aren't that speedy.
     
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