About 100 ft higher than you could get me to go... the kid's got titanium ones.

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by lewisboats, Jul 17, 2014.

  1. lewisboats
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

  2. Doug Lord
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    Doug Lord Flight Ready

    Wow! I got the same feeling watching that I do when I see roofers on a 4 story or larger house with an angled roof-God thank you for not letting me have to do that!
     
  3. Petros
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    Petros Senior Member

    looks like fun, keep you in good shape as well. the view from the top is best.

    Their safety line technique could use some work, many of the "anchor" points they are clipping to could come loose in a hard fall. And of course during much of the climb they are not clipped in at all! Many years ago I used to do a lot of big wall climbing, including in Yosemite Valley, learned a lot of proper rope handling, and how to manage fear of heights (it is always there, it is a matter of managing it so you can continue to function).
     
  4. Poida
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    Poida Senior Member

    Maybe they figure if you fall, by the time you reach deck height, the deck's moved so you fall in the water behind the stern.:mad:

    Although they want an authentic ship, some modern safety lines would be desirable.

    Poida
     
  5. Tiny Turnip
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    Tiny Turnip Senior Member


  6. ImaginaryNumber
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    ImaginaryNumber Imaginary Member

    In 1929, as a young man, Irving Johnson sailed from Europe to Chile, around Cape Horn, on the Peking. It was one of the last of the large square-riggers to make the voyage. He made a famous movie of the experience, including scenes of a violent storm, taken from the rigging, with the ship rolling so bad that green water was sweeping the deck -- a couple of men were washed overboard. In their free time, for the fun of it, they would slide down the bolt ropes on the edges of the square sails.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eLuIp7lFqdk

    Irving Johnson | Wikipedia
     
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