A whole new catagory of river boat.

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by river runner, Dec 3, 2011.

  1. river runner
    Joined: Jul 2011
    Posts: 172
    Likes: 6, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 91
    Location: Colorado

    river runner baker

    Is this the worlds biggest, widest kayak, or a whloe new category? This boat is about seven feet wide and over eighteen feet long. Too wide, obviously, for a kayak paddle. This is an oar boat. Are ther problems with the design? I'm sure. But I see advantages.
    The shape would call for composit construction. Kevlar over foam core?
    I see this forum as a place to share ideas and information on boat design. Am I wrong? Some of my ideas might be "out there", but there is some nugget of logic to all my designs. I hope at least a few of you are getting some enjoyment and inspiration from my ideas.
     

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  2. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    Yes, it does appear as a big kayak. Not too far out there.

    Before I can really comment, the elephant in the room is determining what your real objectives are:

    - a "safe" ride in rough water where capsize is eliminated?
    - carrying capacity for extended trips?

    There is a thriving trade on the Upper Ottawa river for commercial whitewater tours - those of us in kayaks think of this as a commuter bus strategy in which high-capacity public transit behemoths roar through the river with all the appeal of an endless stream of diesel-spewing city transit buses, one every thirty seconds. Big, safe, noisy, filled to the brim with huge people clenching little paddles. "Adventure" tour operators run you over in a heartbeat, and their operators think the river is their personal private profit territory.

    Your design is pretty close performance-wise to a Gucci tour bus inflatable - unable to play, tough to turn and slow through the pools. If that is what you want, great.

    Part of the appeal of kayaks is the ability to plant a paddle using a Duffek stroke and spin out of the stream into an eddy behind a rock without any visible effort. Turning is easier than going straight. Dropping an edge and ferrying across current with little to no paddling.

    Your design is too big to sit and play in a hole, leaning back and surfing. It'll get blown out of fun water fast - but maybe that's the point.

    Lots more rocker, more volume up front and some kind of cockpit coaming is needed - as is some provision for a skirt. It's too wide to roll, so if it does invert, it won't be fun. It doesn't look right-able by someone swimming, so it may cause some very long slow swims to shore towing the Titanic, holding oars and practicing colorful language.

    Feedback, but probably not as positive as you want. Your renderings are getting better and please keep following your ideas!

    --
    CutOnce
     
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  3. river runner
    Joined: Jul 2011
    Posts: 172
    Likes: 6, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 91
    Location: Colorado

    river runner baker

    This is meant as a substitute for a raft or Grand Canyon type dory, not a substitute for a white water kayak. A white water kayak is the ultimate white water boat, but it is incabable of carrying supplies for a multiday trip, such as down the Grand Canyon. Hence they usually go with a "mother ship" such as a raft.
    And I admit that I don't have the skill or courage to take a kayak down the Grand Canyon. Probably don't for this design either, for that matter. I guess I'm trying to bridge the gap between a kayak and a raft. I'm hoping I've ended up somewhere in between.
    Once in a while I have an epiphany with my CAD program. I had one recently, but I still have a long way to go. I have ideas in my head that I can't yet express. I'm not a big numbers guy, but I think I am good at thinking outside the box.
     

  4. river runner
    Joined: Jul 2011
    Posts: 172
    Likes: 6, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 91
    Location: Colorado

    river runner baker

    Here's an image for you. A group of kakyaker and rafter are hanging out at camp, drinking beer, when some kayakers float by on the river, then this boat, like nothing they've ever seen before, goes by, following the kayaks. It would blow their minds.
     
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