a question - fisher18 stabilizer

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by articcat1, Oct 8, 2014.

  1. articcat1
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    Location: fairview

    articcat1 New Member

    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 20, 2014
  2. tspeer
    Joined: Feb 2002
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    Location: Port Gamble, Washington, USA

    tspeer Senior Member

    Yes.

    What's shown in the picture is only for the purpose of adding roll damping when at anchor. It needs the lever arm of the boom held out to the side of the boat, so it moves vertically through the water as the boat rolls.

    If you attached it to the bottom of the boat, it would not have the lever arm and would become useless, as it would be slicing horizontally through the water as the boat rolled.

    When underway, the damper would be added drag and wouldn't contribute to the sailing ability of the boat.
     
  3. AndySGray
    Joined: Jun 2014
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    Location: Cayman

    AndySGray Senior Member

    Hi,

    Welcome to the forum,

    Just a quick note, your thread title is really not a lot of help - either it will be missed by interested parties or it will be opened by those who have little or no interest.

    Perhaps you could add some helpfull 'keywords' to the title fisher18 stabilizer etc.

    Good luck with the build and please post progress photo's as you go - will be appreciated by your peers.

    :D
     
  4. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    The hartley 18 is a stable hull. No need to add anything.
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Welcome to the forum.

    Agreed, the 18 is pretty stable, so why do you perceive the need for a stabilizer on this design? This particular type of stabilizer isn't used on the bottom of the boat, but is hung over the side from a boom or derrick.
     
  6. articcat1
    Joined: Oct 2014
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    articcat1 New Member

    thanks for all the reply's guys. i wasn't talking about that one, i should have been more specific. i mean the stabilizer, i believe its called that, is attached to the bottom of the sail boat.and the reason i wanted to add something is i live around the ocean and just wanted some extra piece of mind if i wanted to use the cabin for a night or two.
     
  7. Waterwitch
    Joined: Oct 2012
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    Location: North East USA

    Waterwitch Senior Member

    If you are talking about adding one instead of the two blue appendages attached to the bottom of the boat shown in your first post. The rear one is a rudder for steering. The deeper one in the middle of the hull is a ballasted fin keel. No it would not help a motorboat to have one. stability in a motor boat depends on arranging heavy items inside low down in the boat and keeping the upper parts of the boat light for a lower center gravity. How big of a sea were you thinking you would be encountering?
     

  8. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Sleeping on that boat in anything but a very calm cove, will present some motion issues. A steadying sail, flopper stoppers, etc. will help, but it's a really a function of the boat's size, more so than it's stability, at least in regard to sleeping on it, in any kind of sea. As to the stabilizers you mention, maybe you can post an image or two, as it seems terminology is getting in the way.
     
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