A question about rudder tubes

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Jacuzzitub, Apr 17, 2011.

  1. Jacuzzitub
    Joined: Apr 2011
    Posts: 1
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    Location: New Orleans

    Jacuzzitub New Member

    Good afternoon, everyone.

    I'm in the process of a complete rebuild of a 1974 McVay Bluenose 24 day sailer. It's my first attempt at boat renovation after years of research and admiring other restored boats.

    I'd like to shorten the rudder tube and have the tiller connected much closer to the cockpit sole. However, I can't figure out how to remove the rudder. There don't seem to be hinges on the hull. It seems like the rudder just hangs in the tube.

    Any advice?
     

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  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I dont know your construction. The top bearing is probably the tube .... the rudder is normally " hung" on a bottom bearing. Run a knife blade along the rudder to keel joint and locate the bottom bearing.... Take a grinder , remove the anti fouling and search for the bearing fasterers or plug. . I just removed a rudder this week and the bottom bearing was hidden because it was faired into the hull , rudder and anti fouled.
     
  3. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    bottom bearing skeg hung rudder
     

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  4. mark775

    mark775 Guest

    Try looking right down near the bottom.
     
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