a pointless boat

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by Tungsten, Jun 9, 2012.

  1. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    yes, cardboard wouldnt do it for sure. I bet some 6mm mdf would be easy to cut out using the cardboard templates if you felt like trying the technique, and you could stick some rough supports inside on the wide areas.

    I see the main benefit of this method would be to reduce the amount of material manipulation required, and the problems of shaping the foam using wire and odd bits of wood. This will be compounded by the pressure of applying the glass - it may make the wire ties move a bit, and distort the hull.

    On a male mould, this would cease to be a problem.
     
  2. Tungsten
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    So back at it again,got my sides glassed on one side.Layed some petg film on them while they cured to get them nice and flat.

    [​IMG]



    With the foam floor not excepting wire stiches that well because of only having glass on one side,i attached wood blocks along the edge with an angle to match the sides.
    [​IMG]

    i then attached the sides with screws and a couple of stiches to keep it all straight.

    [​IMG]

    i routered a 45 onto the edge of the floor so the sides had something to rest against,this helped keep them in place.the sides are up higher so after its all glued i'll be able to round over the foam to make a nice chine.
    in some spots i used wood washers to keep the wire from pulling through the foam.
    [​IMG]

    Some goo mixed with fillers between the stiches.

    [​IMG]


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    so onto fillets and tape.i have some 45/45 12oz 6" wide i was going to wet it out first then lay it out,but i'm thinking this may not work with this kind.the glass is fussy enough nevermind when its wet.
    any ideas?
     
  3. SamSam
    Joined: Feb 2005
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    SamSam Senior Member

    What layup do you plan for the bottom for durability? You don't want to drop an anchor or something and have it go through.
     
  4. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    No that wouldn't be good.Anchors stay on the outside,flyrods and beer go inside.

    I'm thinking around 36-42oz will see when i get there.
     
  5. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    i managed to play with some of the 45 glass,i was surprised to see how easy it lifted off of a sheet of plastic after i wetted it out.laying it out on a fillet worked well and after rolling out the peelply i was able to produce the nicest tape job i had ever done.

    one thing i forgot to try was how well it would turn or bend around the inside of the chine.is this normally done in small lenghts?or could one stack or fold up a longer length then wet out?
     
  6. Tungsten
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    I don't know what u guys are talking about this glass was easy to apply wet! j/k

    so fillets and tape done.
    [​IMG]

    flipped and ready for glass.
    [​IMG]

    question,after i fill the seams.which goes first? tape over the outer edges then complete glass over sides and bottom? or glass bottom and sides then tape over edges? the bottom and side glass will overlap the seams. the sides are getting 6oz the bottom will be alot more .i also plan on bagging the bottom laminate onto the foam.
    for tape i have 12oz 6" 45/45

    hope this is clear,thanks.
     
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  7. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Looking good so far.

    I would suggest putting the tape on last. Structurally it doesnt matter, but having a tape on already potentially makes applying the big sheets a bit more of a nuisance.

    The corner tapes tend to be a bit sacrificial too - while the big sheets atre better kept away from wear and tear.
     
  8. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    yes thanks,one thing i forgot is my bottom glass is 50" my boat at the widest is 48".doesn't give much for overlap.Maybe one layer of tape first just to lock it all together.then when i vac down the bottom i'll add some more tape to each side to get a little more overlap.or i could seam my 50" glass in the middle.so many options.
     
  9. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    well time sure flys when its summer,hope ya all had a good one.

    i'm about to do the bottom of my boat,i have some 21oz triax 0 45 45 i'm wondering if the 0 should touch the foam or the otherway around?

    on the inside i have 45 45 as the first layer.

    also i've rolled it out and cut it to shape on the boat.i found the 0 alwatys needed to be pulled to flatten it out.my plan was to roll this back up, any tips on this.sure would be nice if i could just wet it out from above.
     
  10. Tungsten
    Joined: Nov 2011
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    well an update for anyone whos interested,
    bottom glass is on,gunnels finished and managed a test float before winter set in.

    [​IMG]
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    Side bench supports in.
    [​IMG]

    This is were i'm at now.I would like to put in a pole seat in the bow.Here i've done it on a pieace of scrap ply,it needs 2 1/2" for clearence for the pole.Having a flat spot in front to stand on is what i'd like but i'm stuck on how to attach this to the floor.

    [​IMG]

    My concern is that i make it so strong that if ever one was to fall against it since its glued to the floor it would rip my top skin off.Or do i make the sub floor lets call it a little weaker so if it were to break it would be an easier fix?

    Also i would like to use foam and glass since thats what i have.I would assume i would bore out the foam and fill with epox where the through bolts go for the pin.
     
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  11. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    rwatson Senior Member

    Great little job - it seems far from a pointless boat

    re the front seat - i would suggest putting some sort of beam right across the hull ( beamways) and fastened to each side, and another one running to the bow. It would also be a use-full addition to the boats structure. You could then Bolt it down to facilitate future maintenance work.

    A foam ridge with layers of glass rather than timber would probably be more in keeping with the 'theme'.

    Relying on the glass layer on the 'floor' is definitely too optimistic, as your instinct tells you.

    Something like ......
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    I see,Maybe the subfloor should match the size of the bottom?This then can be tabbed to the sides and the floor.Removing the subfloor would be handy but how?Maybe some T nuts epoxied in?

    So just to be clear a 300mmx300mm wooden box tabbed to the floor wouldn't work?

    thanks for the help.
     
  13. michael pierzga
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    michael pierzga Senior Member

    I prefer three legs to one.

    The weaklink will not be your bond to the floor , but the leg fasteners into the ply and the stress concentration of only one foot.

    Since you like composites work...Perhaps a tripod built of PCV pipe bent into a U, covered with eglass plus a carbon sleave as two legs , with a third PVC glass carbon leg to the bottom of the seat.
     
  14. rwatson
    Joined: Aug 2007
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    A bigger subfloor would be good, as long as you had the beams running to the extremites still.

    T nuts is one way - I would go for solid epoxy locations, and drill into them later. Cleaning epoxy off fittings embedded is a bit of a pain, and matching bolt locations while you are dealing in liquid epoxy is troublesome. Easier to drill through the base once it is solid, and get an easy match.

    A box is a great idea, but my guess is it will still concentrate the pressure more than is ideal.

    You could easily do a test panel and check, but the bond of the fibreglass on foam is quite low, and pressure from leverage may lift it easily. Foam is for compression mostly, and your skin probably isnt thick enough to resist the 'buckle' effect with all that leverage high up.

    In the end, you will have to judge based on your closeness to the project of course.

    The PVC tripod would work a treat. PVC is a great former, and makes a neat way of providing protrusions in a glass environment.
     

  15. Tungsten
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    Tungsten Senior Member

    I like this idea but the reason for the single pin is it can be removed so when i'm fishing on stillwaters solo ,theres nothing in my way.
    Thinking outload,2 pins could be back and to the sides by the chine with the third up front also by the chine.Once removed the floor is flat and clean but when the seat is erected there would be pipes in the way of your feet.hmmm have to think about this.

    Perhaps a bench straddling the gunnels is a better road to follow..

    thanks,
     
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