A monocoque that sails without heeling

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by Vega, Oct 29, 2005.

  1. Vega
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 1,606
    Likes: 26, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 132
    Location: Portugal

    Vega Senior Member

  2. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    The sail crew is very lazy!
     
  3. safewalrus
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 4,742
    Likes: 78, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 659
    Location: Cornwall, England

    safewalrus Ancient Marriner

    Calm ain't it? Whats it like in a blow? OK I can see the good points, but falling over is half the fun, isn't it? Few interesting stresses there in a bit of strong stuff I bet
     
  4. Vega
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 1,606
    Likes: 26, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 132
    Location: Portugal

    Vega Senior Member

    Yeah, I agree with you. Perhaps the system could be turned on just for cooking:p . (my boat heels easily to 30ยบ and cooking is not easy):(

    About performance, a boat that sits upright in the water would not have less drag?
     
  5. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    Lorisail would love this " canting mast". How would they put foils on it?
     
  6. Tim B
    Joined: Jan 2003
    Posts: 1,438
    Likes: 59, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 841
    Location: Southern England

    Tim B Senior Member

    I can't tell without the sort of drawings they're not going to divulge, but it looks like they're using the mast to cant the keel (not such a bad idea in itself). Unfortunately, this means that the righting moment you would get from the hull is reduced to (or near) 0. Consequently, you can't carry as much sail. also the effect of canting the rig to leeward is not beneficial, there will be a small drop in power, but the basic moment is still rolling the boat over. Canting a rig to windward will increase power due to increased wind speed.

    It is an interesting concept, but there is a lot on it that should be refined. firstly the hull-shape, then the keel-track.

    Perhaps then it might be more feasable,

    Tim B
     
  7. water addict
    Joined: Jun 2004
    Posts: 317
    Likes: 6, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 73
    Location: maryland

    water addict Naval Architect

    whats the point of having the spar rotate with the keel? I don't get it.
     
  8. Vega
    Joined: Apr 2005
    Posts: 1,606
    Likes: 26, Points: 58, Legacy Rep: 132
    Location: Portugal

    Vega Senior Member

    I would really like to take a good look at the stability curve of that boat.

    Stability speaking, that boat works the opposite way of a normal sail boat. First you get stability from the ballast and then, when the keel reaches max. course movement, the boat starts to heel and then you will get form stability.

    I agree that there is a lot of work to do and it looks like the guy that has invented the rig is not a sail specialist.

    Now, if that movement of rotation worked mechanically on a double ring which drove the keel to the oposite side of the mast...that would be another story...;)
     
  9. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    OSHA has ruled that no one may move for or aft while canting. :)
     
  10. Jocko
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 12
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Manitoba

    Jocko Junior Member

    tspeer will probably know for sure, but won't the sail's thrust drop off as the square of the cosine of the mast's inclination? Doesn't that negate any advantage? Oh, and what would be the advantage of the inclined mast anyways?
     
  11. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    No bow watch is needed in fog.
     
  12. CT 249
    Joined: Dec 2004
    Posts: 1,701
    Likes: 79, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 467
    Location: Sydney Australia

    CT 249 Senior Member

    Not a very new idea either....in one of the "Ancient Interface" symposium papers there's a lecture about early sailing patents. One of the very first had the rig canting to leeward and the keel canting to windward, while the hull stayed level.
     
  13. cyclops
    Joined: Feb 2005
    Posts: 1,059
    Likes: 5, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 38
    Location: usa

    cyclops Senior Member

    I smell a job for a mini super computer and a bigger and stronger hydraulic ram, maybe 2, to gain complete control of mast and keel in all conditions.------------------------------- Where is Lorsail when we need him?
     
  14. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
    Posts: 15,448
    Likes: 1,014, Points: 123, Legacy Rep: 2031
    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    There is a patent from the late 1800's on a rig like that. I saw it in an old issue of "The Rudder". I'll post it if I can find it. It was unsucsessful because it depowered too much and also the boat looses the stability the heeling force gives it.
     

  15. sailsmall
    Joined: Jul 2005
    Posts: 100
    Likes: 0, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: West Coast

    sailsmall Senior Member

    Looks like a pretty nice concept to me. There are stability curves under the heading CARACTERISTIQUES I wonder what its like in swells and a breeze.
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.