A maximalist outboard cruiser, why not?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Westfield 11, Apr 5, 2008.

  1. Sailor Alan
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    Sailor Alan Senior Member

    Well a sort of 'slow cooker', in this you bring it to a boil, presumably on your normal gas burner, then enclose it in this bag, and depart the marina.

    http://www.coolthings.com/wonderbag-slow-cooker/

    Re accomidation. A double cabin, double bunks, or quarter berths, fore and aft, is an excellent arangement, and I prefer a central walkway, between elevated helm stations rather than a side walkway. Most boats, excluding these Bolger variations, have more headroom in the center. At this length, there is no reason you cannot work in a head compartment each end, on one side, perhaps a bit like Reul Parker's Commutor 36's head, in concept, if not design. Alternately, in your particular case, why not make the head compartment full width, and have to pass through it into each sleeping area. Head itself one side, shower stall the other, walk through the center, about 3' lineea feet. It might use (hardly waste) length forward, containing a sunken deck area for handling chain, anchor, and dock lines.
     
  2. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    Ummmm ... yeah, having a head at the ends of a somewhat long boat might be nice: side effects of medicine for someone's myasthenia gravis.

    ... I don't know if I'll ever get to build this thing but I'm pretty sure I'll learn a lot trying to get in all the stuff needed into the space available.
     
  3. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    While searching around I came across thus again and remembered something I didn't say at the time with respect to Gilwood and bulkheads.

    I actually wouldn't look to the majority of the strength to come from the wire. It's job is to help panel rigidity of the wood and not really to enhance load bearing strength of a bulkhead panel. In particular, small boats may benefit from this because, say if one was using Gerr's scantling rules, they might be able to use thinner bulkheads than are otherwise easy to deal with because the thin plywood is too bendy. By improving the rigidity of a thin panel it may permit its use and help save weight. Likewise, that Gilwood has superior resistance to punch through than a similarly thick plywood would help limit damage to the interior of the boat when accidents happen in the cabin.
     
  4. Sailor Alan
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    Sailor Alan Senior Member

    Just for fun, here are a couple of simple plywood OB powered launches. The 'flat' bottom is so shaped as to be a 'wave rider' sliding, or surfing down its own stern wave. This came from research into wave rider supersonic aircraft, the XB70 being most famous, though I worked on the Sonic Cruiser.

    This larger one is 55' LOA.
     

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  5. Rurudyne
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    It appears to be a variation on a stepped hull with a box keel aft.

    So three questions:

    A) what sort of trim is it meant to assume at cruising speed, is the bow still in the water;

    2) does what seems to be a box keel aft (under the curvy profile flat bottom) have straight sides or are they shaped to match the wave form somehow, as the rest of the hull bottom is;

    pie) is this the sort of thing that is optimized for a limited speed range or more like a displacement glider with a normal bow up front?
     
  6. Barry
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Barry Senior Member

    A 13 degree hull is going to pound horribly at planing speeds.
    There are a couple of aluminum (for reduced weight) boat builders in the pacific northwest that have what you are looking for and will make changes on a custom build.
    Eaglecraft Marine out of Campbell River, BC and Lifetime Boats out of Duncan BC. Both are on Vancouver Island and have made hundreds of watertaxis and recreational boats that are proven inside passage vessels

    Re engines
    Lifetimer builds up to 34 feet and often uses outboards but for your application, I would consider a 400 hp, Volvo D-6 DHP inboard outboard. The engine fits closer to the transom and I assume that you will want a swim grid, so the outboard portion fits underneath the grid and out of the way.

    I would install either a Bosch or Paloma propane on demand hot water so you can have hot water at any time.
    You could use a hydronic, Hurricane is a good make, heater and use that for heating as well as hot water.

    You did not say how many people that you are intending to sleep on board.

    If two, I would put the V Berth up front. Due to the rise of the keel, this is a very efficient use of room as you do not waste a lot of space as you would if you put a bed further back in the hull. Coming back from the front a dedicated shower on the port side opposite the head on the starboard side. The separate shower creates a wet locker to hand wet rain gear. You did mention an inside passage cruise. Plumb heat into it to dry the gear.

    Then up the stairs
    Helm on the stbd with seating for one and adjustable for the pilot as you will need good visibility to dodge logs etc.
    Many upscale boats use a Stidd or equivalent seat on a pedestal which wastes a lot of space for the pedestal. I would instead go with storage under, perhaps a good location for a fridge but then a very short pedestal on top for helm adjustability
    Portside, go with a fixed seat facing forward so guests can see outside when underway. This seat should accommodate at least two people.
    Kingfisher Boats out of Vernon BC, should have mentioned them as well, build 32s with outboards, have a versatile seat that flips to provide a forward facing seat then flips over to provide seating for two at the table. Of course behind the table, you would/could have the other seat for 2 more people. This assembly would turn into another 2 person bed if necessary.

    Stbd side would be the kitchen. Opt for a propane 3 burner stove, built in fridge/freezer

    Rear windows should give a view to the back deck especially if you are fishing. The Dutch door from Diamond Seaglaze is a great ventilation option. Consider installing a second minimal station in the cockpit to aid in docking or handling the boat when bringing in fish. A bow thruster is an excellent option.

    A roof mounted davit to get your tender off the swim grid clears up the rear for visibility and provides a life raft of sorts

    Some of the three builders mentioned have a cockpit sole height different than the cabin sole, ( or is that cockpit lazerette height) Many drop the cabin sole down. I personally do not like this as you have to duck your head to get through the door and you loose volume that can be utilized for some mechanical items under the floor

    From the cockpit I would have 2 steps up into the cabin which could give you additional storage under the cabin sole with hatch access for those items you want to carry but seldom use. Water tanks etc.The shear would have to be raised to accommodate this but if you look at the increased shear on say a sportfisher, the look is pretty nice.

    These builders use a forward sloping windshield which you either have to like or not. It will keep quite a bit of rain off the windshield and an extended brow over this windshield gives great visibility when it rains.

    Just aft of the cabin door you will have room for another hatch or two widthwise for bumpers, tools, maybe the Hurricane then a bulkhead in front of the engine. I would put a hatch that goes within a foot or so of the sides as engine access can be a pain if you go with an IO.
    If using outboards, this can be space for mechanical items, batteries etc

    Up top, you can install coolers, freezers etc,

    If you look at the Kingfisher site, they have a 32/34 with twin outboards and a kicker for trolling.

    I would include an autopilot as if you are travelling long distances at slower speeds it is nice to sit back and have coffee without making hundreds of course adjustments

    Most of these boats are trailerable behind an F350
     
  7. Sailor Alan
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Sailor Alan Senior Member

    Good observations. Though not 'stepped' in the classic sense, it has similar characteristics. It might have limited speed range, certainly at the upper end. In any sort of wave motion, it must slow to hull speed or risk pounding damage. To me a small price to pay for a level economic ride.

    The bottom is flat laterally, quite narrow, with no box keel or other protrusion. The bottom bulges down about 1/4 LOA from the bow, then sweeps up, and finally down to the stern. In one sense, the boat planes on the after most 1/3 of its hull, but the forward part is 'heavy' enough for the bow to be also down in the water. Partially at least, the boat planes on the bow 1/4-1/3, AND on the aft 1/3 as well. Hence the boat rides level supported at two points. The boat is sliding down the forward slope of the wave generate by the after most planning surface, though held level by the bow section planing in front of that wave.

    The bottom proper is fairly narrow, defined by the chamfered chine.

    Here is the smaller one, showing slightly more detail, including the chine shape.
     

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  8. Rurudyne
    Joined: Mar 2014
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    Rurudyne Senior Member

    Ah, I see. What was throwing me in the first picture is that the chine wasn't as clear: it looked like a stepped hull from the side.

    Given the narrowness of the actual bottom, do you think this boat type would benefit from the sort of bulge of built up and smoothed plywood that Bolger, Payson and others used to reduce slapping?
     
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