A Layman's question...

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Steve Vernon, Aug 19, 2008.

  1. Steve Vernon
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    Location: Halifax, NS

    Steve Vernon Junior Member

    Hey folks.

    My name is Steve Vernon and I'm a Nova Scotia writer. I am looking to pick your brains here regarding a question about boat repair. Hope you can help me out.

    A character in my novel is attempting to repair an old-fashioned wooden dory, the kind built like the old Viking longboats, (lap built, I think they call that?).

    The dory has been holed by an errant caber toss.

    How would the fellow who built the dory in the first place go about making his repairs?

    Steve Vernon
     
  2. BHOFM
    Joined: Jun 2008
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    BHOFM Senior Member

    The Viking boats, ships, were built with full length planking
    carved to shape rather than bent to shape! This meant using
    large trees and only getting a few planks for each one!
    The stem and stern and keel where built first, then the planking
    was added, because they were carved to shape they required
    little internal framing, the curve being the strength of the hull.

    They were fastened with pegs and copper rivets! Repair was
    just to remove the fasteners, make a new plank, install and
    be on your way! They were more than mere sailors or warriors!
    They had to be to survive!
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Most dories uses a unique construction method, called the dory lap (along with other elements) and generally are called dory built.

    Had she been holed, the repair may take on several different approaches, depending on where it was holed. Typically a "scab" would be scarfed or butt blocked into the damaged plank. If more then one plank was affected by the damage, the separate plank repairs would stagger the seams of the scarfs or butt blocks, as to not make a weak area on the side of the boat.

    Of cours,e dory as well as Viking building techniques evolved over the years, incorporating things learned from previous generations and to address nagging issues. The repairs would also show a similar development curve, based on era, repair skills and budget.
     
  4. Steve Vernon
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    Steve Vernon Junior Member

    Thanks kindly.

    I do, of course, have to do some homework on my own, but this is damned helpful.

    Keep it coming. :)
     
  5. rwatson
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    Now - is this book a comedy?

    If so, the guy could be completely inexperienced in woodworking, so the most amazing problems could arise.

    If not, maybe he is a lawyer, and he could sue the kilt off the caber tosser.

    A caber would fall across the boat usually, crushing the thwarts - or did it drop straight down through the floor - in which case it was possibly done on purpose.
    Give us a bit of background here now - like how the hell did a caber get anywhere near a dory ?.
     
  6. Steve Vernon
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    Steve Vernon Junior Member

    It's meant to be comedic.

    The caber throw was just plain bad aim, and it did (as I see it), impale the dory.

    The fellow who is re-building the dory owns it, and also chucked the caber. He ought to know a bit about dory building - but probably not as much as he thinks he knows.
     
  7. rwatson
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    Location: Tasmania,Australia

    rwatson Senior Member

    I would saw the caber up to make planks for the repair to teach it a lesson for a start.

    Make sure he quarter saws the log to make the planks.
     
  8. Steve Vernon
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    Steve Vernon Junior Member

    Damn, rwatson, that's a great idea. Only the caber has been out in a backyard for way too long and is probably too dry for that sort of thing.

    Still, it might make a make-shift mast...
     
  9. Steve Vernon
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    Steve Vernon Junior Member

    In any case, I'm sure he's going to think this one out aloud - ie: "I ought to saw this caber up for planks. That'd teach it a lesson."

    I should tell you folks that I have had a couple of maritime books published in the last few years and I'm certain I can get this one out to print as well. I will make sure to thank everyone here in the dedication department. So far, your advice has been invaluable. :)
     

  10. WBC
    Joined: Aug 2008
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    Location: Cape Coral

    WBC Junior Member

    He ought to know a bit about dory building - but probably not as much as he thinks he knows.

    Isn't that so true ......
     
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