A Houseboat that Sails?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by NolensVolens, Dec 28, 2016.

  1. NolensVolens
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    NolensVolens Junior Member

    This bottom-coppering technique has been used by Dave Zeiger of Triloboats, and I intend to follow his lead on this. My one concern is that according to some reports in tropical conditions copper does accumulate hard growth. The copper to use is medium-hard roofing copper.
     
  2. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Think predrilled holes would be difficult to work with and almost inevitable some misalignment causing a percentage of hull punctures.

    What about slightly elevated bolts or screw in lags with copper sheets set on them and then slighly tapped identifying areas for drilling. A heavy tar bed can then be applied prior to installation.
     
  3. NolensVolens
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    NolensVolens Junior Member

    The holes in both the copper and the plywood are going to be drilled using an NC mill (a ShopBot, most likely). The positional accuracy is +/- 0.005in (0.127mm). Misalignment would happen only if there is a programming error.
     
  4. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

     
  5. NolensVolens
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    NolensVolens Junior Member

  6. goodwilltoall
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    goodwilltoall Senior Member

    Impressive the NC cutting machines.

    Completely flat deck reduces rerighting, acting as suction cup upon the water as racing boats have shown. So 130 maybe an inaccurate number.
     
  7. NolensVolens
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    NolensVolens Junior Member

    I have no idea whether Orca3D software figures in the "suction cup" effect; I'll have to take it up with them. But I do know that a non-flat deck would be a nonstarer when it came to being able to tango passionately all around the deck, and that's a must-have requirement according to #1 client.

    There are deck arches, two of them enclosing somewhere around 16 cu. ft of air. In a knockdown they are designed to provide additional buoyancy above deck. They more than make up for the lack of a cabintop or an arched deck. They also house the sheet travelers, serve as air intakes for ventilation, provide supports for a canvas awning or a winter tent, house electronics, provide mounting places for nav lights and deck lights, have hooks for hanging hammocks, and a high place to stand to work on the rigging or to gaze at the horizon. I don't know how life could even be possible without deck arches.
     
  8. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Watertight deck lockers when mounted at the bulwarks add buoyancy too where it counts to resist to roll further in a knockdown, and so they're increasing the boat's AVS value. When mounted at the deck centerline the added buoyancy will foremost decrease the boat's initial upside-down stability by getting the boat's center of upside-down buoyancy down.
     
  9. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    1. There's no such thing as "suction cup" effect in violent waves I believe.

    2. Quidnon's high free board will put her ballast high aloft when upside-down. This upside-down high center of gravity decreases her upside-down stability. Then wind and waves hitting the high free board and the rocking of the boat on the waves will knock her back on her feet I think. This isn't in the calculations as wind and waves are not always there, but most likely there's a lot of it when going and being upside-down.

    3. Bad luck for Racers since they lack this high free board feature, and they have a taller rig which damps rolling back more, and they have often more sail aloft as a cruiser when going upside-down which also damps the rolling back more, hence they're more likely to stay upside-down.
    Dutch link:
     
  10. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    1. 130° = AVS = the equilibrium before going upside-down or back to right-side-up, but when upside-down she also has to pass the same equilibrium to get back on her feet, so her upside-down AVS = 50°.

    2. If she had a trunk cabin then the missing internal volume of the lower positioned aisles a/ gangways b would take away a lot of buoyancy where it counts most to resist to roll further in a knockdown. So then her right-side-up AVS would be much lower and her upside-down AVS would be much higher. Her initial upside-down stability would be smaller though, as the center of her upside-down buoyancy would be lower placed with a trunk cabin.

    a & b I'm not sure what's the right word in the above context: a aisle = US English ? - or - b gangway = UK English ? - Is there a common English word for it ?
    ( In Dutch it's ‘‘gangboord’’ )​
    P.S. - I've never understood walking down the aisle . . . ;)
     
  11. yves
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    yves Junior Member

    The rudder blades seem a bit big to me, and why having the mechanism so outside the boat ?
    In any case cool looking project !
     
  12. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Re post #12 and #15:
    Just saw in a Suzuki brochure PDF a sketch that quite nicely illustrates a High Thrust's beefed up lower leg unit . . . :cool:

    (bottom part, of page 3, of the above linked brochure)
    _Suzuki_High_Thrust_Outboard_Motor_Lower_Unit_Principle_Illustration_DF50AV-50Hp_DF60AV-60Hp_.jpg

    Suzuki outboard leg, lower unit, principle illustration, DF50AV(50Hp) + DF60AV (60Hp) high thrust series.

    Note the pink sketch of the high thrust lower unit around the lower unit of the standard Suzuki 50 and 60 Hp outboard versions.

    P.S.

    Below from the thread: Repower Inboard Prop Pocket Hull with Outboards ?post #11, a more standard list of matters to take note of when selecting an outboard...
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2017

  13. Silvertooth
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    Silvertooth Junior Member

    Large outboards are problematic and have short lives in my opinion.

    I would prefer smaller outboards that are cheap and more reliable.

    You could have a spare outboard motor on board and easy enough to change it in a hurry.

    Or a perfect combo these days isn’t an little electric outboard and a petrol one, the petrol one could charge the battery then use electric one of about the same size, or on rare occasions you could use both together if needed.
     
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