A Head Turner From PAR

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by dskira, Sep 18, 2011.

  1. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Daniel, somehow I missed this when you originally posted it. Thanks for the good advice.

    I had a voicemail from PAR when I woke up this evening for work, telling me he hoped to have the plans done by Christmas. First thing I'll do is make a complete shopping list, and start squirreling things away as I find and can afford them..
     
  2. Landlubber
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    nice one troy, look forward to seeing it get going in the new year eh.
     
  3. Easy Rider
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    Easy Rider Senior Member

    PAR,
    About the rocker of the bottom I notice the curve is a bit like a fish form hull. What would be the difference in the way the boat rides on the water. With the thick part of the curve fwd (as you present it) I would think the boat would be able to operate at higher speeds. Whereas if the disp and crest of the curve was moved aft the hull would be more easily driven at slow speeds but would ride bow high and pound more at higher speeds. You can design the boat but people can put whatever sized engine they want on the boat. Did this influence your design? The effects of rocker differences fascinate's me.
    Easy Rider
     
  4. daiquiri
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    daiquiri Engineering and Design

    Easy, more than looking just at the rocker (which is, of course, an immediatley visible feature) you should look at the longitudinal distribution of volume. That's what creates the wavetrain when boat is moving. And that, unfortunately, is something that cannot be easily evaluated from presentation drawings like the ones in the first posts of the thread. The maximum rocker can be fwd but the lcb aft of the midship, for example. The Egress boat (RYD 25.3) looks like having the volume distribution pretty much centered around the midship to me (but I might be wrong, of course).
    Cheers
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Egress's LCB is at 57%. The deck plan gives an idea of volume distribution as does the body plan, but it should be noted there is a bit of flare in the forward sections, which makes the beam look as if it's carried forward more then it actual is.

    Slavi has it right Eric, the rocker forward is also probably misleading and suggesting more volume then there really is.

    Eric, picture the rocker if the bow wasn't so plumb, say with a 30 degree rake. The look wouldn't be quite as dramatic. To further this impression, add a touch of bow overhang to the stem, also with the additional rake and see how you like the rocker. Her entry half angle is 23 degrees, so she's not very bluff.
     
  6. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    looks like it would make a dynamite paddle wheeler
     
  7. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    It does have that look, doesn't it?:)

    But a stern wheel would involve a major redesign of the bottom. Side wheels would involve trying to keep the machinery out of the living space, and would make it a nuisance to dock. that's my opinion, anyway. I'll wait for the designer to weigh in on the subject....

    All around, I think an outboard is by far the most practical way to go on this one. I did ask Paul about putting in a well, but it just eats up too much deck space. He told me he's done it on larger versions of this series, but I don't want to go larger.
     
  8. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    Practical? Boat? when did you go round the bend.

    We could compromise and use a small practical diesel :D a fly wheel and a nice cast aluminum connecting rod. Maybe a nice cast aluminum pair of brackets and wheels as well. Paint it all stove pipe black and no one would ever guess. And it keeps the CG low. Hit something with a 2x paddle and its a lot cheaper to replace than a prop.

    Just playin, I like the design but its begging for a paddle wheel and a nicely trimmed stack
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There's nothing practical about paddle wheels, though a while back one poster seemed convinced this wasn't true. Twin wheels at the stern would have the least impact, but still would eat 1/5th to 1/4th of her length in the propulsion units, then where does the engine(s) go again? Side wheels are a joke, though if the boat is big enough, it can afford the accommodations lose for the engines.

    I did a faux paddle wheeler some years ago. It had a big single stern wheel, that was free wheeled and 2 Honda outboards, mounted in a well forward of the wheel. Forward motion and prop wash rotated the wheel, so it looked cool unless it was maneuvering, when the wheel did weird stuff as it bounced around in the wake.

    The series that Troy's boat is in, has been intended to have the riverboat look to it, but from the outset designed to be a houseboat, with cruising potential (most in the series anyway can cruise). The aft deck is 6' deep, so other propulsion setups aren't practical. This is the second smallest in the series, but the larger versions have well mounted or inboard arrangements. I suppose a V drive and inboard could be rigged, but there's not much depth to the bilge under the cockpit, making this arrangement tight. A box keel could be added which would solve this problem, but a lot of complication when an outboard does the job, nearly self contained. Then there's the maneuverability issue.

    I think she could have a stack or two, just for the look, maybe venting for the cook top or a wood stove. I also tried to keep the "off the water" height manageable and have the mast on a tabernacle. I suppose a stack could fold down, but more complication for a fairly simple design.
     
  10. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Maybe I'll just add a pair of stacks anyway. I could rig them with hot iron plates and oil squirters, for those dramatic entrances into a marina.:D

    Of course, then the AQMD (Air Quality Management District) would probably climb all over my butt...

    Whoops. Looks like Paul beat me to it....
     
  11. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    paddles are less efficient at low speed and shallow water? I'd have never guessed.

    looks great just the way it is Par, you know me, gotta change everything.

    do you have the updated version for Troy ready for a showing or is it still on the drawing board?
     
  12. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    What you're looking at in the elevations pretty much is the updated version, with all the major changes incorporated. Raised pilot house, arched windows, sheer break, bull-nosed stem instead of dead straight, etc. The original basic concept was a lot simpler, with amateur builders in mind.
     
  13. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    There are some subtle differences between the actual plans and what's posted. The pilothouse has been moved aft about 3/4", the main cabin shortened a couple of inches, both changes to make the bulkheads land on frames neatly. There are other subtleties, but the image is small enough you'd never notice them, except the skeg has been changed, which is noticeable. The hull has some minor revisions, again nothing noticeable in this scale.

    Hot plate cooking oil, what can they say?
     
  14. ancient kayaker
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    ancient kayaker aka Terry Haines

    - not a good idea - cops will think it's a chip wagon or a donut stand and come from miles around!
     

  15. Archie1979
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Archie1979 Junior Member

    Troy,
    I must say mate she looks a beauty, as for Pauls design skills they look second to none and I know from all the information he has provided me with my build in the past he is more than willing to help out.
    .....

    Now back to finish my litlle baby

    Archie
     
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