A Head Turner From PAR

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by dskira, Sep 18, 2011.

  1. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    PAR send me the drawing of a relay beautiful river boat.
    I think someone here in the forum will built her!
    And I can't wait to see more about this river queen.
    Thank you Paul for sharing this design
    Daniel
     
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  2. FMS
    Joined: Jul 2011
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    FMS Senior Member

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  3. Poida
    Joined: Apr 2006
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    Poida Senior Member

    That Cooper JR.

    The only fault I can find with that boat is, she's not mine.

    Is that planking or ply and could she be trailable?

    I don't think I need the crane, I can load the beer 1 case at a time.

    That is beautifull!!
     
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  4. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Poida, when the cooler is empty, those kegs are heavy . . .
     
  5. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I'm the guilty party. Paul started this design for someone else, and was well into it when his client 'decided to go in a different direction,' as I think he put it. So he offered to finish it up for me.

    Yeah, I know. I was going to build a self-designed 30' sharpie for my retirement, not a riverboat.:p

    But a certain amount of common sense is seeping in. This is certainly a more practical craft, and something I might actually be able to coax the wife onto. And I think it's immensely appealing; it'll be one of the prettiest things on the water wherever it goes.

    The original concept was slanted towards simplicity and commonly available lumber, for an amateur build. But I wanted it pretty, and I have confidence in Paul's design skills; I figure if he can draw it, I can build it. Maybe not as quickly and efficiently as a professional boat builder would, but I'll get it done. So I said yes to the broken sheer, the pilot house, the arched windows, the tumblehome in the cabin sides, etc.

    I probably won't start Egress for about two years, but I want it ready to float about the time I retire. Meanwhile, my son and I are still planning to build Billy Atkin's 21' sailing canoe. It'll be invaluable experience, and it'll give me something with sails so I can go play in the wind when I get the urge....
     
  6. yipster
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    yipster designer

    yeah second that, PAR does well, plenty experience and nice styling
    as i commented recently on Wetlander and Emily Rose in his gallery
     
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  7. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow Carbon Based Life Form

    Very nice.
     
  8. thudpucker
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    thudpucker Senior Member

    From my perspective, how about a Sliding Door for the Cabin?
    My boat had a Banging swinging door that was always in the way or trying to get my in the arms or backside.

    I always wanted to try a Sliding door. What's involved with that?
     
  9. troy2000
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I don't have that much experience with boats, but I've built a lot of houses. I'd never install an exterior pocket slider, because the pocket lets weather into the wall.

    Doors that slide on the inside or outside of a wall are somewhat more practical. But it's a pain in the behind to ensure they're weathertight when they're closed, without them hanging up on the weatherstripping when you try to open them. And of course, you have to leave enough space free and clear along the wall for them to operate....
     
  10. thudpucker
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    thudpucker Senior Member

    Yes, all good considerations.
    At one time I thought two small doors, one from each side....
    Probably everything conceivable has been tried and the effort scrapped, because we all seem to see Swinging doors.
    I just thought I'd ask.
    I'll go back to the Grog, seeing that today is; "Talk like a Pirate day!" arrrrgg ye lubbers, ji'n me below for yer rations....
     
  11. Landlubber
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Landlubber Senior Member

    ...he is a clever little **** eh...nice work mate. John.
     
  12. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Sliding doors can work, but are problematic and tend to weaken bulkheads or make them overly heavy, as they need a stout structure to resit wracking which will make them break or bind. A swinging door can have beveled or shoe box closure and if dogged down, is fairly easy to make shed water, if not water tight, sliders, not so much. Double doors are twice the complication and expense and don't offer much in return for the extra convolution. The aft end of this boat needs a companionway hatch anyway, because of the cockpit sole height, so sliders just wouldn't work. Generally, three boobs may seem desirable, but most are much more comfortable with two and there's less maintenance involved too.
     
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  13. thudpucker
    Joined: Jul 2007
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    thudpucker Senior Member

    Good Par, I knew there'd be at least one good reason if not two or three.
    You River Live aboard has a pile of good features.
    I was on a lot of Liva-boards while I lived in SE Alaska. Every Harbor is full of them.
    Those Nice big Deck's and the Ramps alongside the Cabins make for good storage and Planter stations.
    It was good to see your creations. It reminded me of Home.
     
  14. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Troy, when I started the Loudoun, I bought a list of things in advance I new I will need at one point. It was quite crazy to see all the things pilling on in the garage.
    Today I feel good, everything I bought went up between 20 to 50%.
    If Paul give you some indication and plans, you can start researching on the Internet the best solution, and buy in advance. You will not regret it. I have the engine for one year, it's already an other higher price.
    I find the Internet an endless source for good things, and no sales taxes, but shipping. I always go on the industrial suppliers, not the marine one.
    I am sure Paul has a good solution for the arched widow. They give the a lot of dynamism and interest on the superstructure. Worth the work.
    Daniel
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    As currently envisioned, the curved top windows are actually standard rectangular single hung windows, with a curved frame outboard and inboard. This is more complication than I would do if I was building it. I'd just opt for a hinged lower section that would swing out when I wanted it open. To me opening ports don't get used as much as more temperate climates. We just crank up the A/C and the hell with the ports. This is fairly typical of tropical environments, but you frost biters might need the windows to open.
     
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