A good hull-deck bond?

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by souljour2000, Dec 2, 2010.

  1. souljour2000
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 481
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    Location: SW Florida

    souljour2000 Senior Member

    this is the description of the hull-deck joint bond on my '71 Seafarer by McCurdy& Rhodes...I am wondering if this was a good hull-deck design to begin with and if it is likely to still be sound.I have not noticed anyhting that would lead me to believe the joint is not good but this boat is almost 40 years old...I am just wondering if the original bond was a good kind of hull-to-deck joint...it has a cap/liner..

    Anyways...here below is the Seaferer 24 manual description of the original manufacture process for the hull-deck joint and I can't understand it in my layman's view:

    (thanks for any comments in advance)

    Unit-Bonded Fiberglass Structure. Seafarer was one of the first producers of fiberglass sailboats and has 15 years experience with fiberglass construction. The lay-up specification of each major part of the Seafarer fiberglass structure is appropriate to the stress requirements of that part of the structure. All Seafarer hulls are hand lay-up using alternating layers of 1.5 oz. mat and 24 oz. woven roving fiberglass. Interiors are one-piece fiberglass designed to provide an element of give when a major impact occurs yet with the strength necessary to maintain hull deflection. Seafarer was one of the first producers of fiberglass sailboats and has 15 years experience with fiberglass construction. The lay-up specification of each major part of the Seafarer fiberglass structure is appropriate to the stress requirements of that part of the structure. All Seafarer hulls are hand lay-up using alternating layers of 1.5 oz. mat and 24 oz. woven roving fiberglass. Interiors are one-piece fiberglass designed to provide an element of give when a major impact occurs yet with the strength necessary to maintain hull deflection. The unique Seafarer hull-deck joint is made by building a box section fiberglass girder around the entire sheer line integral with both the hull and deck moldings. A teak cap is fastened to the top of the girder. The result is a good looking toe rail which accentuates the beautiful lines of the boat, yet is extremely strong, completely leak-proof and requires absolutely no maintenance-ever. A teak cap is fastened to the top of the girder. The result is a good looking toe rail which accentuates the beautiful lines of the boat, yet is extremely strong, completely leak-proof and requires absolutely no maintenance-ever.

    Is the process described in bold italics a good way to do this joint? Or is it just fancy-talk for a standard glued hull-deck joint with a flange?
     
  2. gonzo
    Joined: Aug 2002
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    Location: Milwaukee, WI

    gonzo Senior Member

    It is a good joint. The sales BS is about no maintenance-ever.
     
  3. souljour2000
    Joined: Aug 2009
    Posts: 481
    Likes: 13, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 195
    Location: SW Florida

    souljour2000 Senior Member

    Okay thanks Gonzo..it seemed a bit of like techie-speak to me... that is not a bad thing...just meant i didn't understand it...Some of these brochures were pretty good at spreading BS around though...

    I am taking a look at the overall construction of the old girl...Not much I am concerned with so far other than the 9,8 Merc sailmaster seems a bit too heavy for the transom thickness and makes the transom flex or bubble out slightly a bit when I exert down pressure on the motor.May just be that the backing plates of the motor mount need upgraded from what looks roughly like 8 inch long 1x3's of an undetermined wood. I like having almost 10 hp back there though so if it mean bolstering the transom beyond upgrading backing plates for the motor mount then I will certainly do it.

    the chainplates also are a bit of concern...brushing one of the bolts on the outside chainplates from my canoe..a flush bolthead simply plopped into the water...I replaced that one...and tapped on all the others with a hammer/screwdriver to see if they were about to fail..none did but I will replace them all.... but the chainplates themselves are worrying . The ones on the outside that come down like tangs are good ol' 304 stain steel and might be okay... but they seem to have reciprocal ones on the inside of the boat that look like they are made of aluminum...anyone seen this practice in boats from the early 70's?..the thing about dissimilar metals worries me if this is aluminum on the inside...mirroring the outer ss tangs...I think I know aluminum when I see it and I looked at them today inside the cabin..at least these 3 chainplate (sets) are easy to get at inside the cabin.....and of course outside....Thanks in advance for any pointers here people....
     
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