a few questions

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by boatenthusiast, Aug 28, 2015.

  1. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six Previous Member

    It was the steel and the temperature.
     
  2. Grey Ghost
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    Grey Ghost Senior Member

    Carlisle's plan had 48 lifeboats.When the Titanic sailed it was only equipped with 20 which complied with the regulation of the time. The 20 had a capacity of 1178. Somehow 472 spaces went unused - 40%! The first lifeboat had only 28 of 65 seats filled. Only 2 lifeboats went back to pickup passengers after the ship sank.
     
  3. Ike
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    Ike Senior Member

    And to add to PAR's post, the reason no ships have been sunk by icebergs since the Titanic is, because of the hue and cry that came after the tragedy, the International Ice Patrol was formed to use aircraft to track icebergs that drift south into the shipping lanes. The USCG and other nation's services have tracked them ever since. They are now tracked by satellite.

    Double hulls are now a requirement on many ships to prevent oil spills if the hull is holed, as well as provide the additional safety.
     
  4. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    In the era the Titanic sank, the liner industry experienced many incident free years and the thinking was they'd engineered out the possibility of a major event, such as Titanic's fate. No one could have predicted the set of events that lead to her demise. In fact, she would have survived had she be a single degree to starboard on her course. Her design was revolutionary for her day and in now way suggests any major negligence. Crew training was ongoing, but lacking at the time of the impact, which was a major factor, but it's pretty common (again era wise) to have only 50% capacity in the lifeboats). The general thought of the day was the boat would sink, but would stay afloat long enough to serve as a raft until help arrived. Radio room errors, incomplete MOB and lifeboat drill training, complacency of the officers and several other factors cause the usual "spiral" of events to descend to her ultimate fate. The steel wasn't any more or less different than others of the era and her sister ship proved the class was more than capable.
     
  5. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    It is typical of major disasters to be multi-factorial, like when all the lemons line up on the slot machine, it is an unusual concurrence of events. In the case of the Titanic, the perceived need to make good time was one of them.
     
  6. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six Previous Member

    Research is a good thing.
     
  7. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    What happens if the ship rammed the iceberg, flush-on ?
     
  8. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six Previous Member

    Cause causes effect, not vice-versa.
     
  9. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Deeply profound, Jammer !
     
  10. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six Previous Member

    Thank you.

    A perfect safety record, therefore, would not indicate that an iceberg patrol, an improvement in steel or the use of a crystal ball solved the problem that sank the Titanic.
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    What idiocy Jammer, clearly you know nothing about nautical history, nor engineering, particularly in a historic sense. In all investigations into catastrophic events, the event spiral is the common denominator. This cascade of events must occur or there's no predictable or antithetical result.

    Had Titanic hit head on or nearly so, which as was an anticipation in her design, one two or possible even three compartments would have been breached, the water tights closed and she'd have remained afloat, possibly even continued under reduced power. She had no chance with 5 consecutive compartment breaches. Had the water tights remained down, instead of being raised, she might have a few more hours on the surface, long enough for Carpathia to arrive, though lots of steerage passengers would have drowned by then.
     
  12. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six Previous Member

    Another solution would have been to tell the iceberg where to hit the ship.
     
  13. Jammer Six

    Jammer Six Previous Member

    That way, architects wouldn't have to do anything complicated, like trying to actually foresee what could happen and plan for it.
     
  14. Grey Ghost
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    Grey Ghost Senior Member

    Planning for anything and everything that could happen despite having never happened before would weigh you down so much you couldn't get anywhere.
     

  15. Grey Ghost
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    Grey Ghost Senior Member

    You'll have to wait 1000 years for someone to figure that out. No tractor beams on the titanic.
     
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