A few questions about an ocean worthy raft

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by boatbuilder44, May 27, 2015.

  1. boatbuilder44
    Joined: May 2015
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    boatbuilder44 New Member

    Hi, I am building a floating raft made out of water proofed wood and oil drums. It needs to stay in the open ocean for up to 2 years.

    Here is a photo of the framework:
    [​IMG]

    Notes: the oil drums will be securely chained on all sides.

    Here is a photo of the completed raft:
    [​IMG]

    Here are some questions I have:

    1) How well would this last approximately 250 miles off of the coast of Maine?

    2) How safe does it look? We plan on living on it for 2 years.

    3) Could we build multiple instances of this raft and chain them together? Clearly I am nervous about building a wooden bridge connecting them, due to inevitable ocean conditions such as this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2PGQy_rNX8o I have a strong feeling the bridges would snap like a chicken bone. So would chains work?

    4) Any ideas on how to keep her from drifting?

    For anybody wondering, we a group of extreme adventurers, we plan on living in groups of 2 in 6 month time periods (2 new sets of people every 6 month). Although we have a bit of experience with the sea, living on it will be new to us. Thanks!
     
  2. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    So you want to loiter 250 miles off the coast of Maine, for two whole years ? Really ? I don't understand.
     
  3. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    I don't think the op does either.
     
  4. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    This one will give the "submarine train" a run for it's money, imo.
     
  5. Grey Ghost
    Joined: Aug 2012
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    Grey Ghost Senior Member

    Very short life.

    It will flood through the openings. Almost zero freeboard.

    It is top heavy and will be flipped over by waves and stay upside down.

    Broad sides will take a beating.

    Structure will probably come apart in ocean conditions within hours.

    Not safe. Not seaworthy. And no safety features visible for when it comes apart.

    Also will be very uncomfortable for any occupants in ocean conditions unless totally calm.
     
  6. ch3oh
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    ch3oh Junior Member

    1) It'll last just fine.
    2) Looks safe to me?
    3) you could, the chains will hold up fine.
    4) Get some volvo penta ips drives. The raft holding the engines should have at least 6 oil drums
     
  7. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    He could get a folding barge with a caravan on top. Bet it would be the only caravan out there. No noisy neighbors.
     
  8. boatbuilder44
    Joined: May 2015
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    boatbuilder44 New Member

    First off I would like to say thank you for ya'lls input. I really do appreciate it.

    Updated model:
    [​IMG]

    In this updated model, there are no windows, in fact the only hole is the submarine like entrance on top (the circle pipe). The base is still made of wood (like the old model) and still uses oil drums to stay afloat.

    On top of the oil drum frame, is a soldered metal box which is where everyone lives.

    Is this any better?

    Edit: the metal box is water proof, so assuming hard waves are encountered, no water will penetrate it.
     
  9. boatbuilder44
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    boatbuilder44 New Member

    This is what worries me. Is gorilla glue + nails enough to keep the wooden frame together?
     
  10. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    Purchase a big old GRP boat , power or sail and go anchor out.

    The USCG probably wont charge for the 1st rescue when the wind gets to F-8 and you want to abandon ship.
     
  11. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    Add some chewing gum for insurance. :rolleyes:
     
  12. ch3oh
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    ch3oh Junior Member

    If you are REALLY considering this, steel oil barrels are a poor choise. They won't last 2 years of corrosion. Get something like an old barge to start with, if it has to look like a raft. Othervise get an old sailboat. If it HAS to be barrels, get those 50gal plastic ones that most chemicals are supplied in. You'll need about 30-50 of those, NOT four. Make the superstructure a lot smaller than the raft to get some stability. Gorilla glue and nails won't be enough.
     
  13. whitepointer23

    whitepointer23 Previous Member

    Sensational. Don't make it fully waterproof. You want a bit of water to swish around so the floors will be self cleaning.
     
  14. Mr Efficiency
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    Mr Efficiency Senior Member

    "Death Wish" would be a suitable name for it.
     

  15. ch3oh
    Joined: Mar 2015
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    ch3oh Junior Member

    So.. If the metal box is waterproof, why don't you get rid of the barrells and use the box as hull? What kind of metal are you going to solder the box of? Are you by any change training for a manned mission to Mars or preparing for war/flood/zombie apocalypse?
     
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