A design for a rowing fishing boat?

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by fishy1, Apr 3, 2008.

  1. fishy1
    Joined: Dec 2007
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    fishy1 Junior Member

    I'm looking to build a boat for longlining from. It must also be suitable for lifting nets and creels. It must be stable, even in bad weather. It should be good to row, as it will have no engine. (Fishing regulations). I'd probably just have one crew on it, plus fishing gear, although the option for two or even three rowers would be good.

    I was thinking something 12-16ft long, don't really know what else. Stitch and glue would be it's construction ideally. If anyone knows of a suitable free design, please let me know. I don't have a huge amount of money to throw at this, so the cheaper the better. (Although obviously it still has to be safe.)

    Thanks alot.
     
  2. kengrome
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    kengrome Senior Member

    Here's a good place to start:

    http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans.htm


    From Steven Lewis, one of the designers:

    Free plans are here:

    http://www.duckworksbbs.com/plans/lewis/duckskiff/index.htm
     
  3. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Scandinavian type lapstrake is one possibility. Google pictures "soutuvene" (rowboat in finnish) and you see variety of boats..
    They can be made of plywood aswell when it's hard to find proper timber..
     
  4. Ilan Voyager
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    Ilan Voyager Senior Member

    Doris boats of East Coast of the States and Newfoundland -Terreneuve Canadian doris are perfectly matched to the use you want from your boat. Doris are easy to build from plywood end epoxy resin (I do not recommend the variants made of plywood and poyester resin, as it is not a durable or safe combination) and fairly cheap when home made.

    Use a good plywood, like a marine lauan, or meranti or finnish or russian pine plywood. Do not use an expensive okoume, it's not worth the price in your use. Use white light pine or epicea for the stringers and other pieces of "solid" wood.

    You'll find in UK good epox resin, and cover all surfaces with a 165 gr/sq meter fiberglass with at least 3 coats of resin. Finish with 3 coats of an acrylic paint car. I made a 17 feet doris in 1981 for rowing, fishing and I put later a 9.9 HP Honda outboard. I sold it in 1994 and the boat is still in use...

    You´ll find a big bunch of plans at Wooden Boat magazine and in the internet. Buy a plan very detailed with complete list of materials and a building manual even if it's a bit more expensive. Take at least 16 feet for 2 crew and 18 feet for three, but do not go over 19-20 feet as it becomes too heavy.

    The Doris chine hulls with composite seams are the easiest to make as it does require very little skills in carpentry. Forget lapstrake it's too long and unsuitable for a beginner. See for the possibilty to make the boat unsinkable with foam.

    http://letolet.ifrance.com/letolet/doris/plans.htm look Doris Portugais 5m17 for the pictures and the plans.

    http://www.shoestringshipyard.com/woodsholedory.htm interesting.

    http://www.woodenboat.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1806824 that may give you some ideas.

    http://www.woodenboat.com/ wooden boat magazine

    If you need more infos send me a message. Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Apr 5, 2008
  5. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

  6. fishy1
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    fishy1 Junior Member

    What about either the smaller or larger version of this?

    http://www.gsahv.pp.fi/ecodory/ecodory.htm

    Also, so I can get an idea of how much epoxy would be needed to cover it, how much area does 1l of epoxy typically cover on ply? What about with fibreglass, how much then?

    Thank you all.
     
  7. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

    Measure from the centre to the gunnels at intervals along the hull to get an average figure and multiply that figure by the length of the hull. You now have th area of one side of the craft. Assuming you will laminate glasscloth both inside & out, multiply by 4. For resin usage, that's personal to the way you work.

    There are free plans at http://www.epoxy-resins.co.uk/plans/freeplans.html & the quantities for resins are included. Having just looked at the dory plans you linked to, a three sheet boat requires 8' x 4' x 3 x 2 = 192 sq. feet or 17.86, say 18 sq. metres.

    Explore & extrapolate. http://www.epoxy-resins.co.uk/plans/freeplans.html

    15' 9" Overall length by 5' 2" Beam Dory Skiff " Morgan"

    Morgan

    The Kit Contains the following:
    15 kg of Epoxy resin/hardener
    2 kg high density filleting mix
    5 x 1" laminating brushes
    5 x 2" laminating brushes
    10 Mixing Pots
    25 Mixing Sticks
    5 pairs Latex gloves
    Calibrated measuring pumps for resin and hardener.
    2 Squeegees bevelled edge
    10 Short pile rollers
    1 Roller frame
    1 Roller tray
    2 rolls 50 mm x 50 metre fibreglass tape.
    2 rolls 75 mm x 50 metre fibreglass tape.
    2 x 5 metre fibreglass cloth ( Sheathing )
    2 x 1 litre cleaning solvent.
    Drawings: 2 A1 pages of ready lofted highly detailed Drawings including drawings of 9' dory oars.
    U K Epoxy resins manual Morgan
    Check out the project gallery
    and watch "Morgan" being built
    just click the image.
    To buy a similar version of this boat in a pre cut kit form will cost you over £2100 to build. Our Resin/Drawing Kit is just £341.25 !!

    BTW, it's good practice to remove the screws and nails as their presence will cause rust to form or damage your tools at some time. Looks at the snow outside this morning, building a sled might be fun. :D :D :D :D :D :D :D

    Pericles
     
  8. fishy1
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    fishy1 Junior Member

    I can manage to work out the area of ply to be covered easily enough, it's just a rough figure of how much epoxy per coat would be needed per m2 would help my calculations greatly. I'm thinking of probably hannu's big sister design, but not 100% yet. If I did do it, I think I'd use ply on the bottom instead of his floorboards.

    BTW, what is the reason dories taper towards the transom? I am sure there must be a reason, whether it is stability or rowing or something, but surely leaving it wider would allow a much bigger space, with not much more weight?
     
  9. Pericles
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    Pericles Senior Member

    Fishy1,

    You have asked a much bigger question than you thought. For the answer your must do your own research, for to travel in expectation is better than to arrive. You have to understand it is the journey of learning that makes us better people, Grasshopper!

    The journey starts here.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dory

    Pericles
     
  10. kengrome
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    kengrome Senior Member

    This is an interesting question, and when you ask in the context of this thread I have to wonder why you're considering a dory in the first place, especially when one of your first requirements is:

    Dories are well known to have low initial stability until heavily loaded, whereas boats with wider bottoms feel much more stable without a load. It seems you might better be looking for a boat with a wider bottom, especially given the 12-16 foot length you prefer.

    A dory in this size will be rather limited in terms of what you can carry anyways. It will most certainly be a one-person boat. Even a strictly one-person dory is usually longer than 16 feet. Here is one of the smallest I know ... and yes it is one of the boats in the link I posted for you earlier:

    http://www.jwboatdesigns.co.nz/plans/lightdory/index.htm

    By the way, that earlier link I posted includes the designers of dozens of good rowboats. Which of these designs are particularly interesting to you? Maybe if you choose one or two of them we can talk about the specifics so you can get a better idea of what you really need ...
     
  11. tom28571
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    tom28571 Senior Member

  12. fishy1
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    fishy1 Junior Member

    I would be certainly loading it heavily most of the time, with nets and other gear, and also fish. I accept that the 16' might be too small for a dory, I'd be willing to go bigger. The design of the boat does not really matter to me at all as long as it's stable, good to row, and can carry lots. It's looking like I will probably have another guy with me on it all the time, so I accept it needs to be bigger.

    The UN model was interesting, but extremely heavy.
     
  13. kengrome
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    kengrome Senior Member

    Yes, now you're talking!

    I think Big Sister is the one you want. I say this because Little Sister can take two people, but if you'll be carrying two regularly (plus a lot of gear) you'll no doubt be happier with more room inside, as well as more freeboard and greater carrying capacity. It's amazing how fast a working boat "runs out of room" once you start loading it with everything you want / need.

    Big Sister will also be better able to handle 3 or 4 people, whereas I think Little Sister would be cramped with just three, even without the fishing gear.

    The plans are the right price too ... :)
     

  14. fishy1
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    fishy1 Junior Member

    Plus, it'd not got lots of shapes of wood to cut, just a few. Would there be any major differences if I changed the bottom to 3/4" ply rather than his floorboards? As in, would handling etc change? How fast could you get the big sister to go with only one rowing?
     
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