A cape Horn vessel

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by evantica, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    Nice emergency kit. However, let's not hijack the thread
    I think the design is bad, for the Horn or elsewhere.
     
  2. simon
    Joined: May 2002
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    simon Senior Member

    http://www.periple.com/ is what I call a Cape Horn sailing yacht, capable of being single handed, extremely solid, versatile and most of details practical. Might not be a purist's dream, but I thought it was perfectly set up for the region around Cape Horn and Antartica.
     
  3. Brent Swain
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    Brent Swain Member

    There is nothing compicated about putting a set of gudgeons and pintles on the back of any rudder, unlss one is mentally challenged. A trimtab drasticaly reduces the power consumption of any autopilot,and the loads on it, and thus drasticaly reduces ones dependence on generating the huge amount of power it takles to steer by the main rudder ,a complicated arangment at the best of times. I don't think I would trust an electronic autopilot enough to go around the horn single handed, with no other option. A lot of people have regreted that ultra naive desicion. . .
     
  4. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    I have a news for you: the self steering was invented and implemented BEFORE your parents were born.
    If you don't know that please, learn.
    Did you heard about BALANCING a boat with a two mast rig, or with a cutter rig (cutter rig as one mast in case you don't know that.)
    By the way, try sailing a real sail boat, you will enjoy.
    Don't give me the "take your medication" it is stupidly insulting from someone who has no clue about what is talking about.
    Please refrain to show your ignorance. It will reflect negatively on your book sale :p
    Daniel
     
  5. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Tell us why?
    I don't say it is good, but I like to know the reasons behind an opinion.
    Just curius.
    Daniel
     
  6. Angélique
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    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Is this a real pic ?

    Cheers!
    Angel
     
  7. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Angel,

    The answer is in post #68!
     
  8. Angélique
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    Location: Belgium ⇄ The Netherlands

    Angélique aka Angel (only by name)

    Thanks !!

    Sorry folks for the rhetorical question about a point that already was made.

    Before responding I should have read the whole thread instead of a quick scan for designs.

    Good Luck!
    Angel
     
  9. Brent Swain
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    Location: British Columbia

    Brent Swain Member

    I have no doubt that self steering was invented befor my grandparents were born. Slocum used his mizzen for one. Did I ever say otherwise.
    While I have had my 31 sailing and balanced perfectly on a broad reach in 15 knots of wind, balancing doesn't work well with all boats, especially downwind, which ,with a little planning, will be most of your voyages. It would be foolish, and just plain bad seamanship, to not take advantage of the advances in self steering, and the sheer simplicity of it. Balancing a boat every time there is a wind shift , or chance in wind strength ,is anything but simple. Been there done that. If it were as simple as some simpletons suggest, there woulk be far fewer windvanes on cruising boats.
    I thoroughly enjoy sailing my curent boat , far more than my tank tested first boat , designed by someone many consider a "Guru."
    I apologise for insulting someone who has no idea what he is talking about, namely you. It was you who started with the insults. My response was appropriate. I wouldnt sell my right to respond for the price of a book. My thinking outside of "Consumer Groupthink " is what makes my book so valuable.
     
  10. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Do´nt underestimate the value of the btu´s it contains (a hint for cold nights).:D
     
  11. dskira

    dskira Previous Member

    Brent your apologize are very stranges. You apologize to insult a little more.
    And then you start the:
    Pathetic.
    You don't know what you did. But I don't care.
    What I care is boat problems solving. You have opinion which you transform on rule. This is very wrong. As a naval architect (if you are one) you should know better then this attitude is a certainty for making huge errors.
    I read your answer on the plating and framing, a student naval architect or boat builder will not have made this mistake after one month of learning.
    You are perhaps a good librairien, and take care of books, but what you put inside your books about boat must be questionable at best, after reading your posts.
    Questioning yourself is the first step you should do when you debate on a subject.
    I do it all the time, and guess what? I learn. After more than forty years I still learning, even with all the degree and experience which will make you a little kiddy.
    But this is very irrelevent if you don't continue learning all the time, day after day, customer after custmer (yes you can learn a lot from customer) other professional, other people, all around. Learning is also from the forum.
    Do not write books, open your mind, take the time to learn, as I do, don't be arroguant, it doesn't worth it.
    It is just boat. Cool off. And learn.

    Daniel
     
  12. Brent Swain
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Brent Swain Member

    In the last 40 years I have build over three dozen steel boats, and I have learned from every one. They have endured many torture tests, and have come out intact, and all the owners who followed the plans, were extremely happy with them. Each is a slight improvement on the previous. Otherwise I wouldn't have been able to take the building process from primitive , imitation wooden boat building methods, to hulls that are far fairer, more seaworthy and which take one tenth the man hours of the traditional methods. Boy , the trouble, expense and time I would have saved if I had the contents of my book back then! I make no apology for trying to pass on what I have learned to save others the trouble it would have saved me.
    What is the biggest problem facing those who want to get out and enjoy the cruising life? The one problem that gets the least amount of effort and innovation, on this and other sites. How to reduce the tremendous amount of work , time and expense of getting good seaworthy boat together. The "Be reasonable and do it the hard way" type of thinking seems to be the prevailing train of thought on may boat building sites.
    When someone tries to mislead others into believing the hard, expensive , super time consuming way is the only way , threatening to make having a good steel cruising boat the exclusive domain of the rich, do I get pissed off ?
    When someone tries to pass of outdated dogma and outright ******** as the only way to think, do I get pissed off? Damned right I do.
    No advancement in technology was ever accomplished by those who refused to question traditional ways of doing things, but who simply read the books, and do exactly what every one else does, and protested loudly when anyone ever suggested there may be a better way. Now that is what I call refusing to learn!
    I will always challenge ******** whenever I encounter it. That is how progress is made.
     
  13. gonzo
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    gonzo Senior Member

    The sites are also full of people reinventing the wheel. They claim that an hexagon is better than the traditional round ones and that any sensible argument is people that are too obtuse to be able to change. New or different is not necessarily better. Tried and proven has a lot to recommend. Hard to build and expensive are not traditional ways. Boats were traditionally built as quick and cheaply as the current technology allowed.
     
  14. dreamer
    Joined: Nov 2004
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    Location: Minnesota, USA

    dreamer Soñadora

    No problem Angel, I get this a lot ;)
     

  15. peter radclyffe
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    Location: europe

    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    quote, Brent, to hulls that are far fairer, more seaworthy

    can you explain this ?
     
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