A cape Horn vessel

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by evantica, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. evantica
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    evantica Senior Member

    my oh my... Allways this hostality on this forum, many of you seem to have serious problem. And to Richard. Yes I'm aware I'm not build a C. Archer, just like those boats! you sead: "and failed as often I suppose" thats right you "Suppose" and nothingelse. And I've been reading, sailing seen and more...and are one in generations of seamen. And probably know more than most of you?! So pleas don't ever think you can "screw me around" my friend, Besides that It's redicoulus to think you could learn and tell me somthing of value with that kind of attitude! It's sad...
     
  2. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    It`s not sad...........

    HOPELESS is the right term!
     
  3. evantica
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    evantica Senior Member

    Apex1. everyone will grow up someday. and you need to grow up. That's not hopeless. it's the truth.
    he...he
     
  4. peter radclyffe
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    peter radclyffe Senior Member

    "Our" boats is a passion and we'll live with them for a longtime, maybe a whole life?! It's kind of like beeing in "love" (right word?) I am surley a romantic figure how's being nostalgic when reading, seeing those old C. Archers, and clippers, barks sailing in strongwinds. fighting trough the seas, and the men aboard probably fealth very alive.
    I also think, there is not many things as pretty as an ol' wooden cutter or even new ones with ol' time looks...
    And what will all this mean then?? = WE HAVE ALL DIFFERENT PARAMETERS, What fells right for you may be the opposite for me. this is -probably- one of the reason for all this arguing and hostal talk. The boat will/ should be an extension of your self (I think) so.........
    "Colin Archer is a good ship and those lightweight crapboats is for *******" :)D ) sarcasm:D[/QUOTE
    your hilarious
     
  5. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    You turn cheeky boy, not the best attitude.

    Bringing that together with your obvious lack of experience at sea makes it unenjoyable to contribute here in a sensible way!:(


    and compare this with your "plan" you might notice some differences.....

    [​IMG]
     
  6. LyndonJ
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    LyndonJ Senior Member

    This is what I think too.

    Have you done the basic ratios and capsize screening formulae that you can present? And people who can comment well asked for some data before too, do you have that?

    I think its too shallow, too short, too much beam and going to be too slow for a safe blue water high latt cruiser. But I'd like to see some numbers before you invite comment.

    Ratios???
     
  7. capt littlelegs
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    capt littlelegs New Member

    Where have you contributed in a sensible way?
     
  8. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Please keep it civil... Evantica asked about opinions and there's no reason to get upset if some opinions are given..
     
  9. simon
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    simon Senior Member

    While cruising around Patagonia, I met two completely different boats , which sailed from New Zealand around Cape Horn to Ushuaia. Of course their size difference is huge, but still may serve as examples.

    - 36 foot long keel, shallow draft, quite traditional boat
    - 55 foot long short keel, narrow, high tech, performing sailing boat

    If I remember right, the shorter boat took more than 50 days and the second boat a bit more than 30 days. Both were in the same area, some hundred miles west of Cape Horn, when high winds hit them. The shorter traditional boat rolled, lost it's mast and had to limp into the Beagle Channel, which by the way was a huge achievement by the single-hander. The longer, better performing boat had a comfortable ride and arrived safely.

    Of course you can argue that size matters. But, then I heard that there was a huge 80 something foot long, long keeled steel boat, which dropped of a wave near cape horn and had it's masts in the water.

    The lighter boat will not take huge impact of the waves and will turn the energy into speed. My boat always seemed to take the slaps of the waves, but never was in danger of being rolled.

    But who knows, it is also about being in the wrong place in the wrong time.

    Simon
     
  10. Perm Stress
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Perm Stress Senior Member

    Dear Sir, this hull shape is far from what Collin Archer designed.

    *hull is not fair longitudinally - huge bumps at frames ## 2 & 7
    *longitudinal immersed volume distribution is far from sinusoidal/trochoidal shape Colin Archer is famous for. (My impression is blue line represent actual volume distribution, with red line showing desired/recommended (by designer) one; the red line look similar to volume distribution according to sine/trochoidal curve , recommended by C. Archer)
     
  11. Pierre R
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    Pierre R Senior Member

    I might help those trying to comment on this boat to also look at this thread. This thread provides more background. http://www.boatdesign.net/forums/metal-boat-building/boat-building-progress-31503.html

    As a thought, there can and often is a huge disconnect between boat design and sailing experience. You can be a fairly experienced sailor and still be pretty clueless about boat design. It looks as if evantica started out with what he thought was a great idea and realized he needed some help from a boat designer. I am sure the boat designer is trying to do his best to salvage the project with the lowest overall cost to evantica.

    I do not think this is a good design to go around the horn with, especially not east to west which is likely the direction evantica has in mind. I don't think it will make much headway in any kind of a sea even with an engine. It would take a long time to round the horn.

    This design is more of a local sailor that if you are caught in a blow will survive such as you might find on the North Sea. As a world traveler with this boat, I would rather stay on a tradwind course and go through the Panama Canal.
     
  12. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    Can I hear you underrate North Sea ;) It's actually one of the worst places to be afloat when it starts to blow..
     
  13. Pierre R
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    Pierre R Senior Member

    I did not imply nor underrate anything about the North Sea itself. I understand it can get rough. A daysail implies that you did not intend to leave port for a great length of time and that you would not leave if the weather were already bad.
     
  14. TeddyDiver
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    TeddyDiver Gollywobbler

    No harm done :)
    and very much agree with your opinion..
     

  15. apex1

    apex1 Guest

    Google

    "Aries Lord" in bad weather on u tube, enjoy the 90 seconds clip, taken from a Norwegian oil rig in March 2007 at bft 10 in the southern North Sea!

    They delivered the pump on that same day btw.!!!

    Regards
    Richard
     
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