a canoe rigging ? for those in the know...

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by 360weatherbound, Mar 15, 2010.

  1. 360weatherbound
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    360weatherbound Junior Member

    I am midway through building a sailing canoe. The plans are calling for a 10 1/2 ft mast and a 50 sq/ft gaff rigged sail. I am free to mess around and I like the idea of more sale but dont want to tack on much more weight. Im also pretty certain I am going to put an outriggor on.
    How about moving the mast(unstayed sticking in a hole through the deck) to the back of the boat and running a small genoa, w/roller furler so as to be able to quickly reef, as the main. This would be a tacking outriggor.

    What does anyone think of that?
    Am I giving up something?
    How big could I make the sail?
    Is it a sail that should go to a sailmaker?
     
  2. Alex.A
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    Alex.A Senior Member

    Have you seen pics/thread on Fanie's tri that had this rig?
    Interesting and though not 100% successful - he definately going on with the concept with future boats.
     
  3. 360weatherbound
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    360weatherbound Junior Member

    I looked him up but just saw the Catamaran. I'd like to see the link if you have it handy.
    Thanks
     
  4. Alex.A
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    Alex.A Senior Member

    Try aftmast rigs or mainstaysail - or ask him, sorry cant remember exact thread title. Worked ok except for keeping the stay tight enough.
     
  5. messabout
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    messabout Senior Member

    Let us be practical even if it disappoints us. Too much sail on a canoe is going to spoil your day. The conventional canoe hull has a finite limit of speed. That is to say that doubling the sail area will not necessarily double your speed. What it will do is make the canoe a real handful. Way back in the day it was not unusual for racing canoes to split the rig into a cat ketch configuration. That kind of rig was fairly manageable.

    International 10 meter canoes, which do not look at all like the general perception of a canoe, does frequently use a main with a jib. The jib is more blade than genoa. The IC is one of the fastest small monohulls you can find, but it ain't a canoe and it uses a hiking plank and considerable skipper skill to keep it right side up.

    Go with the plans and rig the boat accordingly.
     
  6. Alex.A
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    Alex.A Senior Member

  7. Fanie
    Joined: Oct 2007
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    Fanie Fanie

    Sorry Alex, the last page is here - http://www.faze.co.za/Little Tri/Little Tri 4.html

    There were some other changes and experiments I did. If you have a small sail in mild wind you can handle it by hand. The little tri had only 12m^2 sail area but when the wind was up 30+km/hr the sail lifted my 100kg clear out of the hull and put me on the tramp, you need a proper cleat and a double pulley ratio.

    I added a boom to see how well that would work and it made it a lot easier to keep the foot of the sail streight. If you're interested I can put up more pictures.

    The lift in the sail keeps the tri from heeling, even in a stiff wind there is very little heel.

    I suspect the daggerboard should be more foreward a bit, in high winds the lift of the sail keeps you from turning to wind.

    The sailing setup is really easy to handle. I never added an auto tacking thing which would have been very nice.

    Personally I'm happy with what I experienced. The harder the wind the better it goes too, the tri not the best shaped hull for speed as it was.


    I sold all my boats, cannot work outside at nigh due to too many criminals roaming the area. My bigger boat goes a lot slower than I anticipated mainly because I cannot work outside. No space inside, but I'm working on it.

    Being boatless is really shitty, I become pannicy whenever a cload appears on the horizon :D
     

  8. 360weatherbound
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    360weatherbound Junior Member

    Thanks for the link, that was what I was thinking.
    I don't have that king of room for rigging though.
    Oh well.
     
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