a ban on lead in fishing tackle ?

Discussion in 'All Things Boats & Boating' started by WickedGood, Sep 2, 2010.

  1. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    Obama and his boyz is Trying to Ban Fishing

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Occasionally, an issue of such importance arises we feel it necessary to contact our loyal customers. With our fishing rights at stake, this is such an issue.

    On August 23, 2010, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency was petitioned by the Center for Biological Diversity and others to ban lead from ammunition and fishing tackle, including sinkers, jigs, weighted fly lines and components containing lead, such as brass and ballast in lures, spinners, stick baits and other fishing products.

    On August 27, the EPA denied the petition regarding ammunition, but let stand the petition to ban lead in fishing tackle and has opened a short period for taking public comment.

    Such a ban would cause prices of fishing products to skyrocket. Alternative metals can cost from six to 15 times more than lead, and most do not perform as well. For many, fishing would no longer be the affordable sport it is now.

    Please join Keep America Fishing in opposing this ban by submitting your comments to the EPA no later than September 15, 2010. You can easily do so by clicking here.

    It is a fast and easy way to assure your opinion is heard.

    Keep America Fishing to protect our tradition and heritage of fishing.

    Thank you for your help.

    **********************
     
  2. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow I'm not a cat.

    Next, they will be banning lead in keels, centerboards and rudders. :(
     
  3. Questor
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Canada

    Questor Senior Member

    Lead is a highly toxic substance that is not necessary for either fishing tackle or ammunition.Many popular lakes and rivers have beaches that are a tangled web of lost fishing gear. I'm surprised that we don't hear of more fatalities caused by entanglement in lost fishing line.

    Given the ever worsening crisis caused by lost fishing gear in our waterways we need to explore 2 options. The first is the possibility of requiring that all fishing gear be biodegradable and non toxic. The second option would be replace all line and net fishing gear with more humane trapping methods.
     
  4. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    What planet do you live on, and how did they screw up and let you off it?:eek:
     
    1 person likes this.
  5. WickedGood

    WickedGood Guest

    "In the Quest for Development and Application of Hybrid Technology we must turn to the Penguin for Inspiration"

    OK? Im not sure I understanmd how you are going to make fishing sinkers from Penquins, but Ill listen anyway.



    Can you make me about 1000 each 1 oz to 16 oz bank sinkers and 1oz to 8 oz bullett sinkers and Ill field test them for you.


    [​IMG]
     
  6. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow I'm not a cat.

    That is something you don't see every day, thank God.
     
  7. Questor
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Location: Canada

    Questor Senior Member

    Trapping works out well for shrimp, crab and lobster. There are already rules in place in Canada that require these traps to have biodegradable escape mechanisms so that lost traps do not become centers of perpetual holocaust. By comparison , how long do lost hooks, lines and nets remain hazardous in the environment ? Many lost nets travel the oceans for many years killing countless numbers of marine fish and animals. There is so much lost gear out there that some people actually make a living out of fishing for it.
     
  8. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    Location: North of Cuba

    hoytedow I'm not a cat.

    Trap them with high velocity lead. It is more humane.
     
  9. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    Sport fishermen aren't commercial harvesters, and they don't use nets.

    Crabs, shrimp and lobsters aren't fish, so it's pointless to tell us how well traps work for them.

    Are you also going to tell us hunters shouldn't be allowed to use rifles, because they aren't humane and slaughterhouses don't use them?
     
  10. Questor
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Questor Senior Member

    I'd be a lot happier if sport hunters were restricted to bows, arrows, spears and sling shots. I'm afraid to go anywhere near the bush during hunting season . There are too many drunken wannabe Rambos out there that can't tell a moose from a Volkswagen. I know four different people that were shot by hunters.

    Like many of my childhood country peers, I spent a lot of time shooting anything that moved. Now when I sit in my childhood forest I wonder if it was acid rain and pollution that silenced the forests or if there were just too many kids out there with 22s and pellet guns. My woodsman uncle claims it is chemical pollution that did it. He has seen many nests with eggs that were crushed because the shells were too soft. He won three law suits against the county for spraying herbicides and insecticides near our farm. He proved in court that each chemical spraying unleashed a holocaust on our bush and swamp areas. I really believe it was a combination of the two factors.
     
  11. troy2000
    Joined: Nov 2009
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    troy2000 Senior Member

    I guarantee there's nothing particularly 'humane' about killing animals with arrows or spears, if humane methods are what you're looking for....

    Sounds like you're in a cultural backwater that's behind the times. The valley I grew up in has noticably more animals and birds than it did when I was a child in the 1950's.

    Partly, that's because the farmers aren't allowed to go crazy with herbicides and insecticides like they did back then (I remember a crop duster spraying the same field I was weeding one day, and having to drop to the ground as the airplane passed over me spewing insecticide). And partly it's because there's less of the "if it moves, shoot it" mentality that was common back then.

    But that hardly means I would ban hunting. And it certainly doesn't mean I would ban fishing with hook and line in the local waters.
     
  12. wardd
    Joined: Apr 2009
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    Location: usa

    wardd Senior Member

    no animal dies a humane or natural death.

    prey animals get old slow and sick and get caught

    predators get old slow and unable to catch prey or get caught and eaten
     
  13. Boston

    Boston Previous Member

    bow hunters are the bane of all forest service rangers, they leave countless animals with arrows sticking out of them walking around in the wilderness every season. Most will not survive the winter but occasionally one will. Its a long ugly death for these unfortunates

    out on the ranch folks would sometimes give me **** for shooting prairie dogs, personally I cant think of a better way to go, one minute I'm standing there looking at that first box of depends and the next, "blam", takes one to the back of the head and I'm done. Its quick, painless and merciful. its also pin point as it leaves the rest of the wildlife alive and in one piece

    B
     
  14. hoytedow
    Joined: Sep 2009
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    hoytedow I'm not a cat.

    Wrong.

    My dog was dying inch by inch,
    And I was taking it hard.

    So I took him out to the alley,
    So he could die by the yard.
     

  15. Questor
    Joined: Aug 2010
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    Questor Senior Member

    I'm more concerned with helping the animals not get shot in the first place.On the positive side of hunting, there are a lot less drunken hunters than in the 70s. Three out of the four people I know that got shot were shot in that era as a result of drunken carelessness. Two of the four were professional guides that were shot by other professionals.

    In a way one of them shot himself. Two guides without clients were getting drunk in a row boat while duck hunting. One lost his balance while taking a pee over the side. His brother extended the barrel of a 12 gauge shot gun for him to grab while he was falling over the side. When he grabbed the barrel of the shot gun it went off and disemboweled him because his brother had his finger on the trigger as part of his grip on the rifle.It took him two days to die.

    Our family farm was on the edge of Algonquin Park in Ontario. It is a very large Park. Most of the family farms in that area have been abandoned and returned to forest. Most of the wildlife I grew up with there is either extinct or close to it. I sometimes wonder if the loss of livestock on the abandoned family farms is a factor in all the missing birds and animals. Our cow pies used to be swarming with insects. The many insects helped feed the many birds.If the cattle are gone and insecticides have killed what is left of the insects that could be a large factor. None of the forestry or environmental people I spoke with will concede that missing livestock from abandoned farms is a factor. If it was a factor for the birds it doesn't account for the missing, ground hogs, snakes, frogs,toads, chipmunks, squirrels, foxes and deer.
     
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