A. A. Apel Plans.....Are they real??

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Tangusso, Aug 16, 2008.

  1. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Thanks guys, I'm happy to be here. Planning on steam-bending the sheer clamp this weekend. It's starting to look like a boat!
     
  2. Gilbert
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: Cathlamet, WA

    Gilbert Senior Member

    Great photos, Todd. Thanks for posting them.
     
  3. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Zephyr update photos

    I just thought I'd keep you Zephyr-doubters updated on my progress. Sheer Clamp is now bent and installed. I'm struggling to decide how I want to create the dash and cockpit arrangement. Any thoughts? I cut a piece of bending luan and fit it as a coaming surface, but I'm struggling to figure how to tie things all together. Overall, things are moving along quite nicely. These 70 degree weekends in March sure help!
    Enjoy the pics.
    Todd
    http://gallery.me.com/woodwerksupply#100548
     
  4. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Am I really the only one??

    Has anyone else attempted to build this boat? Has the Zephyr ever been successfully built? Could I possibly be the only one to tackle it? I see lots of negative comments pointing out all of the reasons why it can't be built...but they're all wrong. Trust me. I know. I'm well along toward heading out across the lake in my Flathead Ford powered Zephyr. No, it isn't an easy build. It's not a kit. There's no manual. You're building a vintage wood boat, just the way Adolph Apel did, not a stitch-and-glue kayak. But it can be built.
    Am I really the only one??
    http://gallery.me.com/woodwerksupply#100548
     
  5. FAST FRED
    Joined: Oct 2002
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    Location: Conn in summers , Ortona FL in winter , with big d

    FAST FRED Senior Member

    There have been huge advances in the design and bottom shape of fast boats these past 50 -75 years.

    You might consider a vessel with the antique "look" above the WL you desire and a modern high speed bottom.

    Today's big block will be very light compared to eras ago.

    FF
     
  6. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Fred,
    I'm not attempting to build a high-tech racing boat. I'm building a replica of a historic vintage racing hull. I don't want it to perform like a modern boat. If I did, I surely wouldn't be going through all this effort. I'd simply take my Donzi for an 80 MPH spin across the lake. I want to sit behind the wheel and feel as though I've gone back in time. Isn't that the whole point of a vintage wood boat anyhow? While I am utilizing CNC technology and modern adhesives, I'm attempting to build a boat which is very true to the original design. Vintage bronze hardware, honduran mahogany planking, and accurate period-correct power. Even the trailer will be vintage design. I want this boat to look, and sound, and smell like 1939, not 2012.
    And just for the record, a marinized big-block Chevy weighs approximately 645 pounds. My period correct marinized 1939 flathead ford weighs 505 pounds...And looks and sounds amazing.
    Todd
     
  7. Plywood Tom
    Joined: Feb 2012
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    Location: Tampa FL

    Plywood Tom Junior Member

    Zephyr

    Woodwerkssupply

    You are doing a great job. I would guess one of the most difficult parts of the project is locating suitable material. Fast Fred has not gotten to the age where looking back is most pleasant. I have gone fast (APBA 130mph record) but now enjoy reaching back to help preserve earlier boating times.
     
  8. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Thanks Tom. I understand that everyone has a different opinion when it comes to designing and building a wood boat. My goal is very clear, and it is to build an accurate replica of a vintage racing boat. Thanks for understanding and supporting that.
    Surprisingly, materials have been one of the easiest parts of the project. I actually have a bit of an unfair advantage in that category. I own a retail woodworking supply company. Wood Werks Supply, Inc. (www.woodwerks.com). We sell machinery, tools, hardware, lumber and accessories. Among other things, I am a distributor of hardwood lumber, marine plywood, West System Adhesives, and many other products which are making this project a far easier task. I even sell several lines of CNC routers so drawing and machining many of the parts was a simple task.
    Despite the few advantages, this has still been a challenging project. But I'm loving it. Every moment of it.
    td
     
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  9. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Hull planking application

    She's upside-down again, and the fairing process is thankfully complete. The rear half of the hull is now planked! i know, it's the easier half due to the mainly flat surfaces, yet it's still exciting to watch it take shape. I chose to plank the rear of the hull with two layers of 6mm Joubert Okoume BS1088 ply. The first layer was bonded to the keel, battens and chine with West Six10 thickened epoxy and stainless staples. The second layer is bonded to the first with thickened epoxy spread on both faces, lots of clamps, and more staples.
    Due to the more complex geometry, The front half of the hull will be planked with three layers of 4mm Okoume strips ripped into 4" widths. The first two layers will be oriented axial and the last will be run parallel to the keel. The entire hull will be saturated with Smith's Penetrating Epoxy and the exterior will protected with 6oz cloth and West System Epoxy. I'll start planking the front half tomorrow.

    http://gallery.me.com/woodwerksupply#100548
     
  10. Tad
    Joined: Mar 2002
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    Location: Flattop Islands

    Tad Boat Designer

    Yep, everyone has a different opinion when it comes to designing and building a wooden boat. I think you're missing the point by planking the bottom with ply and epoxy. There's nothing like that panicky sinking feeling when you drop off plane at the end of a high-speed run and water comes pouring in through the bottom seams because you just pounded all the caulking out.......:D
     
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  11. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Good point. I really am going for an authentic experience. Maybe I should consider a century-type bottom. Only one layer of planking and almost no caulking between the seams! I'll just plan on soaking it for several days every time I use it.
    Hey, if I wanted to stay dry I should have built a car, right?
     
  12. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Beautiful lines

    Well, the first layer of bottom planking is now complete! I always enjoy this stage in any boat building project. After months of studying, and building the skeletal frame of the boat, suddenly the smooth, streamlined compound curves of the hull come to life. This is why we build boats...

    http://gallery.me.com/woodwerksupply#100548
     
    Last edited: May 9, 2012
    1 person likes this.
  13. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    New image gallery

    It's been a while since you've heard from me. Apple shut down their online photo hosting service, so I was forced to find another home for my project photos. I have been making some great headway on the Zephyr though. Check out the updates here:

    http://smu.gs/OSYo3B

    Bookmark that gallery if you're interested as I'll be updating every few days.

    td
     
  14. messabout
    Joined: Jan 2006
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    Location: Lakeland Fl USA

    messabout Senior Member

    Todd your pix are first rate and so is the build. One of the pix reveals the presence of the requisite moaning chair. I hope that you are not obliged to use it often.
     

  15. woodwerkssupply
    Joined: Jan 2012
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    Location: Columbus, OH

    woodwerkssupply Junior Member

    Blood, sweat and tears...yes, but no need for a moaning chair just yet. This is far too big of a project to not enjoy every moment of it. I don't want to go sulk in the other room after a broken screw or skinned knuckle. Lots of planning and studying occur in those chairs though.
    Ok, and on rare occasions I've been known to sneak a nap too. Shhhh.

    td
     
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