90 Ozark Deck Boat rebuild

Discussion in 'Boatbuilding' started by phil32, Jul 23, 2012.

  1. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Use the biax, it's stronger for it's weight and you'll use less resin. Again, you don't need CSM with epoxy, as it just wastes resin.

    Grind down the surrounding area so it "feathers" out, at least 1/2 the laminate thickness, which will provide a place for the new material to live without a bulge. On the inside layer it up pretty good, as the repair will probably not be seen, so the bulk of the additional laminate can be hidden. On the outside you're looking for a smooth, seamless repair, which requires some fairing.
     
  2. phil32
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Indiana

    phil32 Junior Member

    PAR,
    Once again thank you. I used 6 layers of cloth reducing by 1" the size each piece. Is this sufficiant coverage?
    The cloth laid down perfect to the curve of the hull and finished just short of the gelcoat on the outside.

    At this point is it advisable to add a layer of cloth and peel ply to the outside or just finish and fair without the cloth.
    Again Thank You.
    Best regards
    Phil
     

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  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I always use some cloth (biax) on the outside, to tie things in. Don't over fill, as you'll need room to fair it smooth. Use enough cloth to save bulking it out with filler (which has zip for strength). Then fill and fair. You appear to have done a very good job, you've come a long way Grasshopper . . .
     
  4. phil32
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Indiana

    phil32 Junior Member

    PAR,
    WOW high praise comming from you. Now I have to live up to it. Im getting ready to flip this puppy and I have a HVLP gun and have had some good results with it. It is a pretty good size hull and I would like to spray it.

    I dont mind spending the money for a top of the line 2 part paint and primer
    ie; Awlgrip etc. Is their a 2 part paint that is easier for the DIYer to use/mix/spray.
    If you think its not for the novice, do these 2 part paints lend themselves to roll and tip. Im looking for a hard and durable finish.
    Thank you,
    Best regards
    Phil
     
  5. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Most of the LPU's can be rolled and tipped, some need "wetting agents" so they'll flow. Spraying an LPU isn't much different then working with automotive finishes, so if you have this type of experience, then go for it. Prep is the real key to all finishes and the LPU's aren't an exception, in fact require more prep, because they're so glossy.
     
  6. phil32
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Indiana

    phil32 Junior Member

    Flipping the Hull

    You see a lot of guys tying boats to trees and everything in between, so I braced the hull and set up my Gantry. Attached a 1" steel bar running thru the drain hole with a 2x4 laged to the outside and inside. I then attached my hoist to the Bow eye with enough slack to allow it to roll over. Clearly the Bow eye is the weakest point . I jacked it up and down many times untill I was reasonably sure it would hold.

    At this point I would like to thank the factory worker who that day used a 2x4 set in thickened epoxy with many layers of tabbing, as Im sure he was thinking, someday some Idiot will try to jack this boat up and flip it using the Bow eye. (It worked for me, but I don't recommend it.)

    One other mistake was using the drain hole in the lower part of the transom. I have a solid transom and I just couldnt bring mysely to drill a 1" hole up in the middle of the transom, but It would have balanced it better and would have rolled over more smoothly.

    All in all I thought the worse thing other than killing mysely, is I drop the boat and do some damage and after PAR stops telling me what an Idiot I am, he would hopefully tell me how to fix it.
     

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  7. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    I don't think you're an idiot. You've proven you're quite capable and an inventive problem solver, which is the true hallmark of any craftsman. You do what ever it takes. I rolled a boat with three old ladies once and I'm kind of proud about it too. You're doing fine.
     
  8. phil32
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Indiana

    phil32 Junior Member

    PAR, Thank you for your kind words.
    I would like to say to other DIYers and Backyard guys and gals who maybe watching this thread, or Googling how to flip a boat. This Boat is 8' wide and 20' long it is a heavy hull and when you have that puppy standing on its side in the air it is a dangerous situation. The best laid plans, Murphys law,and all those things come into play. It's not worth getting yourself or others helping you hurt.
    For me I think this is and maybe over the limit of backyard flipping. Far better off to take it to a boatyard and let the professionals do the job for you.
    It will take less time and less worry and everyone will be around to enjoy the finished boat.
    I have seen flipping with larger crafts, but we rarely see the ones that go wrong.
    Professional means Professional.
    There are limits !!!!
     
  9. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Is that your wife, using her sandal clad foot to hold that beast, from sliding around on it's side in the driveway? Did she make you write you last comments? Be honest . . .
     
  10. phil32
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    phil32 Junior Member

    No, she is a next door neighabor that saw what was going on and lent a hand and an uncovered foot. Her husband showed up and we moved her out of the way. Sometimes you take a foot when you can get it.
     
  11. PAR
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Unfortunately, I've taken quite a few feet over the years, usually deserving them . . .
     
  12. phil32
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Indiana

    phil32 Junior Member

    Attaching Deck

    PAR,
    While im sanding and filling, sanding and filling etc. Thinking ahead is it a good idea to slightly dish out the joints of the plywood deck and add a layer of glass to bind them together? Also what is the best fastners to use to attach the deck to the beams since they will be left in.
    Hope this finds you well.
    Best regards,
    Phil
     
  13. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Yep, I use a 7" or 9" grinder with a 24 grit pad, held at a shallow angle, to plow out a wide, shallow concave depression, for just what you describe. Then this is wetted out and filled with biax and structural filler. It may not be completely necessary, but I like sealed and bonded joints.

    Drill proper sized pilot and clearance holes for stainless fasteners and bond them with epoxy as they go in. I've done this countless times without corrosion issues, assuming the heads and the threads are covered in goo. The stainless fasteners most commonly found will be sheet metal screws, which require a different pilot and clearance hole than wood screws, but the process is the same.
     
  14. phil32
    Joined: Jun 2011
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    Location: Indiana

    phil32 Junior Member

    Knees

    PAR,
    Still sanding and filling and hope to get a couple barrier coats of epoxy on this weekend.
    When replacing the knees do you attach then directly to the hull or leave them off the bottom. I understand creating a hard spot, but it seems to me it should be a solid structure. Would you kindly advise.
    Hope this note finds you well.
    Best regards,
    Phil
     

  15. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Place the knees in a bed of thickened epoxy, then spread the ooze out into a nice even fillet along both sides, where it contacts the hull shell. This preps the area for tabbing too.
     
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