8ft microcruiser sailboat based on PDRacer hull

Discussion in 'Boat Design' started by Scowt, Jun 9, 2014.

  1. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member

  2. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    You had better make the hull bigger with all the extra weight you are going to add.
    What is the cabin for? Unless you are a midget you are not going to get in a 4' cabin.
    If it is to take camping supplies you need to make the hull bigger still.
    Will this have seated headroom inside?

    Sorry, I just don't get it.
     
  3. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member

    True the cabin is 4ft. Another 4ft for legs is under the benches on either side- not much detail on that, I know. The cabin is 39 inches. Just tall enough to sit in. I'm sticking with 8 ft because the hull conforms to pdracer specs. It's a small boat, but a proven sailor from all the pdracer videos I've seen. It's only 4.5 sheets- 3.5 of them are only 1/4". 1 (bottom) is 3/8. Total weight is around 100lbs.
     
  4. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member

    My main wonder is how much difference adding a cabin will make in the performance. Without the cabin , pdr's cruise around 4 knots. Don't worry I would never think of hittin the ocean, but lakes seem ideal and I can put it in my pickup for hauling around. Seems perfect for weekend trips and such.
     
  5. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    I don't get it, I really don't get it.
     
  6. lewisboats
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    lewisboats Obsessed Member

    there is precedent... Ocean explorer

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    It has two quarter berths although the hatch opens on one. 1 adult and 1 child have slept in it. There is a 12 foot version too. Many PDs have had cabins put on them.

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    At least one of those (the red one I think) has done the Texas 200
     
  7. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member

  8. RHP
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    RHP Senior Member

    The annual get together of the Looney-Tune Society? The white van is just out of shot.
     
  9. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member

    Whew, I appreciate the back up. I'm stuck on the micro concept, I guess. The ocean explorer influenced my cabin idea greatly, but I want to be able to sit up in it
     
  10. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member

    All aboard!
     
  11. upchurchmr
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    upchurchmr Senior Member

    Apparently guys have fun in a PDR.

    RHP and I agree.

    I would never want to sail a sand box
    I believe these are an exercise in masochism
    "look how tough I am to sail this"

    It would be cheaper for you to buy a used plastic boat and actually sail and build your skills - in comfort, faster, safer, and the ability to make lots more distance - finding more new things to experience.

    Even look at all the Bolger boats - many of those will actually sail (some even while looking hideous - IMHO).

    Step back and look at that boat. You have probably added double the weight of the original boat. It will sink that much farther, making it sail that much worse. Then you load it for cruising. It would be easy to add that much weight again. Soon you have no freeboard, you cannot move around the boat without taking on water. It won't be anything but a raft.

    You won't be able to sell it when you get tired of not being able to sail.

    Now you take the cabin off and fill it with sand for some child - a real sand box at last.

    Never mind me, its your money, time, and life.

    Actually I have a better investment: Please no cabin!
    [​IMG]
     
  12. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member

    I feel honored to have that Alabama sailor pic on my thread. Thx
     
  13. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member

    image.jpg
    More inspiration for you
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2014
  14. Scowt
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    Scowt Junior Member


  15. Dave Gentry
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    Dave Gentry Junior Member

    *Just to be clear, (most of) my statement, below, is not in reference to the micro cruiser versions.*

    Despite not looking like a traditional boat, a nice PDR can be a very fun and amusing sailboat, with far more bang for the buck than just about any other 8' boat. While most that I have seen are truly appalling eyesores, some PDR's actually look very nice, and sail quite well indeed. In the right conditions, they can really get up and go, too.

    IIRC, the PDR was mostly based on the Bolger Brick. The John Welsford and Mik Storer versions have upped the ante - try one of those and you'll find little to sneer at.

    Dave Gentry
     
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