8 foot wide shanty boat

Discussion in 'Stability' started by jrl5678, May 4, 2007.

  1. dick stave
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    Location: MISSION B.C. CANADA

    dick stave Senior Member

    Here's some pics from aforementioned plans...Maybe a good starting point?
     

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  2. jrl5678
    Joined: May 2007
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    jrl5678 Junior Member

    Thank you dick stave for the photos I like the look of that boat it is a good representation of what I am after.
    I was in the room where all men do there great thinking (Head) and relized I had made some bad calculations on my pervious post the surface area on the water would be 256 square feet so If I want it to Draw 2 feet or less then the supported weight is more like 1500 lbs. I am catching on. I am looking for any and all info.
    I really like the Bow on the boat in the picture.
    I also have a question about peoples feelins regarding not powering the boat and using a small work boat or scabing an outboard on to it in the event I need to move it?
     
  3. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Nice boat, dick.
    Cheers.
     
  4. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

  5. SamSam
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    Location: Coastal Georgia

    SamSam Senior Member

    </p>
    You need some ventilation in that room. ;o) Fresh water weighs about 62# a cubic foot, salt water about 64#. A 256 square foot hull immersed 1' in fresh water would displace 15,872#. If your hull and everything in the boat had a total weight of 15,872#, it would draw/draft 1'. If it was half the weight, 7,936#, it would have a draft of 6''. If it was twice the weight, 31,744#, it would draw 2'. Sam
     
  6. SamSam
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    SamSam Senior Member

    Maybe it's a misprint, but 1/4'' ply is too thin. A good way to find the weights of materials is to take a bathroom scale to the lumberyard, tell them what you are building and go around and weigh the different materials. Sam
     
  7. jrl5678
    Joined: May 2007
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    Location: New York NY

    jrl5678 Junior Member

    Thank you all.
    I am thinking 2 layers of 1/4" ply so the seams are running cross to each other with a good layer of epoxy between as glue and as sealant. Also, some glass on the bottom and at all joints.
    AA <<
    AA <<
    AA <<
    My drawing is not so good but maybe you get the idea.
    I say some glass because I am not sure yet of how much the weight of the glass and tape used on the joints on the inside.

    SamSam thanks for the weights and the lesson on displacement. I have an old construction school book that list the weight of a lot of building materials and for the most part I will use those weights, the idea of taking a scale to the store is a good one though. I know when building an airplane we took all the raw material and put it on a scale and that was our basic weight for the initial calculations. Further nice web link about the bucket, I think I will go with one of the prefab complete systems mostly cause I like the gadgety approach and the ladies do not like going in a bucket, unless it is a fancy one.

    Wow long post

    My other boating hobby is kayaks. For now it is Hudson River kayaks. I am looking in to getting a marine handheld to listen to river traffic and to respond to the police, harbor patrol, Cost Guard with, if an emergency arises. Is there a good thread on marine hand hells or the correct forum to post on?
     
  8. jrl5678
    Joined: May 2007
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    Location: New York NY

    jrl5678 Junior Member

    I think i may have gotten off topic a little.
    I am trying to figure out the stability issue of a long narrow (er ) boat

    I have one ration of three to one. I am wondering if four to one is ok.
    also I am interested in the theory of ballast and keeping the bottum on the bottum on a long low slung narrow flat bottomed boat.
    or really I would love to talk about anything
     
  9. Robert Miller
    Joined: Dec 2003
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    Location: Rhode Island

    Robert Miller Junior Member

    Why not use a small tug?
    This offers several advantages in that it can push your houseboat/barge around when desired, but can also be used alone to tool around the river or bay when you wish.

    Tom MacNaughton has some wonderful small tugs and houseboat/barge designs. Seems like a pretty nice lifestyle to me. (Hell.... we have water in the basement of our present house half the time as it is!)

    Check out these links (there are more on Tom's site):

    Tugs:
    http://www.macnaughtongroup.com/tugs.htm
    http://www.macnaughtongroup.com/bufflehe.htm

    Barges:
    http://www.macnaughtongroup.com/bantam.htm
    http://www.macnaughtongroup.com/evening.htm

    Best,
    Robert
     
  10. Guillermo
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    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    Yes, a very interesting combination...
     

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  11. Guillermo
    Joined: Mar 2005
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    Location: Pontevedra, Spain

    Guillermo Ingeniero Naval

    ........deserving some extra lateral thinking: integrated tug-barge vessel.
     

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  12. jrl5678
    Joined: May 2007
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    Location: New York NY

    jrl5678 Junior Member

    If I could build them in my back yard and trailor it with a F-150, it would be mine. I am not after a super yacth but both of them are nice.
    Very nice
     
  13. Busman1965
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Florida/Bahamas

    Busman1965 Junior Member

    Shanty boat

    Here is a shot of my Shanty boat, which is 25ft long, by 8ft wide, on two 22"
    aluminum pontoons. The cabin is 6'7" off the deck, and is 1/4 ply, painted over. I built her quick and dirty, and she has lasted for 10 years, with minimal care. The stability is not a real problem, except in big boat wakes on the beam, then she rolls badly, so I have learned to turn into big waves. The cabin weighs about 600lbs and is 12'x7'10". I would imagine a barge hull would be much more stable than pontoons, so I doubt you will have a problem with a 3 to 1 beam on a larger hull. I have run this boat all over south Florida, in some very bad weather, and she always handles it....wet, but safe. Heck she rode out 3 hurricanes in 1 year sitting on her trailer in my yard. The trick to these type of boats is to keep the weight low, build heavy on the bottom and lighter as you go up. I did a 3/4" deck, with 4x4 under, and 1/4" sides and roof on 2x3 frames. The roof is coated with elastomeric roof sealer, over bare ply, and has never leaked, and it will hold my weight.
     
  14. Busman1965
    Joined: Jun 2007
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    Location: Florida/Bahamas

    Busman1965 Junior Member

    Picture

    here is the picture
     

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  15. jrl5678
    Joined: May 2007
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    Location: New York NY

    jrl5678 Junior Member

    Hi Bushman1965
    I like your post thank you but your photos did not come through I would really like to see them.
     
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