7x19 Wire Shrouds

Discussion in 'Sailboats' started by SuperPiper, Apr 8, 2011.

  1. SuperPiper
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: North Of Lake Ontario

    SuperPiper Men With Little Boats . .

    She's only a little boat and she gets trailered a bit more than some.

    I changed the shrouds from 1x19 to 7x19 halyard wire a 1/2-dozen seasons ago. The 1x19 would get kinked while stepping the mast or while trailering or from other abuse associated with having the mast laying across the cabintop.

    I did step up from 1/8" to 5/32". So far, I'm very pleased with the outcome. The soft & pliable wire can be bundled out of the way easily without fear of kinking or causing a lantern.

    I've helped to step masts on bigger boats with rod rigging. That can be like petting a porcupine.

    So, what are the disadvantages of 7x19?
     
  2. michael pierzga
    Joined: Dec 2008
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    Location: spain

    michael pierzga Senior Member

    Fish hooks , longevity, stretch, strength. But it sounds like a good choice for a small trailer sailor. Next rigging change investigate fabric rigging.

    http://www.colligomarine.com/
     
  3. Dean Smith

    Dean Smith Previous Member

    made me smile I saw a superyacht the other day, the lowers were 63mm at a guess solid rod. the boom was at least 4 feet deep, mind simply boggles
    here she is launching, possibly the ugliest darned supeyacht money can buy Alongside her at the old cement wharf in Auckland is another perhaps longer superyacht, a replica looks like, she is all grace. Talk of chalk and cheese
     
  4. DGreenwood
    Joined: Aug 2004
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    Location: New York

    DGreenwood Senior Member

    An, as yet, relatively undiscovered boon to the small boat sailors of the world, is the magic of synthetic fiber rigging. MP is right, it is hard to find a reason not to use it for small trailer launched boats. Light, flexible and strong. Keep it covered from UV when not in use and it will last a long time.
     
  5. Dean Smith

    Dean Smith Previous Member

    you are right, the strength of Spectra for standing rigging and kevlar for halyards is unbelievable
    We use spectra on the furl lines . You could just throw it is your car boot
    7x19 was used a lot for halyards , galve did not spragg as much as ss(fish hook) Now it is all kevlar
     
  6. SuperPiper
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: North Of Lake Ontario

    SuperPiper Men With Little Boats . .

    You are probably right. Synthetic fibre rigging is the way of the future. Fortunately, my stainless steel 7x19s will last another 20 years and the synthetics technology will have matured by then. I would think that UV resistance should be in the design brief for sailboat rigging (or a written disclaimer about "not suitable for outdoor sailing").
     
  7. DCockey
    Joined: Oct 2009
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    Location: Midcoast Maine

    DCockey Senior Member

    Our trailerable sailboat has 7x7 rigging which is much more flexible and less prone to kinking than 1x19 but has less stretch than 7x19. It's not as widely available in stainless as 1x19 or 7x19.
     
  8. philSweet
    Joined: May 2008
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    Location: Beaufort, SC and H'ville, NC

    philSweet Senior Member

    One "note" regards synthetic rigging. I've heard a couple reports of boats being refitted with synthetics that hummed outrageously. Owners couldn't stand being on the boat. The only thing I can think of is that the spirals on wire rigging trip the vortexes in a random manner and that limits sympathetic vibrations.
     
  9. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    I've been using synthetic rigging on a dinghy for years - I'm happy. I do reduce rig tension to the point where it is no longer "singing" when the boat is on the dolly - basically the boat doesn't need the stress when unnecessary. I crank up the rig tension based on conditions and setup.

    I've got the rig tension set by 8:1 control on the forestay, which routes to both sides and can be adjusted under way.

    --
    CutOnce
     
  10. SuperPiper
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: North Of Lake Ontario

    SuperPiper Men With Little Boats . .


    This has been percolating in my noggin'. I'm starting to really warm to the concept. My boat's forestay needs to be replaced. It is still 1x19. Where did you get the synthetic forestay? DIY? Made to length? What fittings do you have at the ends?

    What are the details for the 8:1? Is there a hard connection in addition to the 8:1 tackle? I'd hate to see the mast come down because someone's butt cheek accidentally released a cleated downhaul. Do you have a photo?
     
  11. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    Just bought at The Chandlery here in Ottawa, cut to length. Used SS thimbles at the ends. There is a becket block on the bottom of the forestay, and a turning block at the deck fitting (2:1). Then it routes to a 4:1 that goes across the foredeck, which is split to go to both sides. Each trimming line is knotted outside the clam cleat, preventing a mishap with accidental uncleating. I'll try to dig through photos to find one.

    --
    CutOnce
     
  12. SuperPiper
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: North Of Lake Ontario

    SuperPiper Men With Little Boats . .

    Doesn't the becket block give you 3:1 for a total of 12:1?

    The SS thimbles are in eyes in the synthetic stay? Who made the splices? The Chandlery?

    Yeah, a photo please. This sounds great!
     
  13. SuperPiper
    Joined: Jan 2003
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    Location: North Of Lake Ontario

    SuperPiper Men With Little Boats . .

    CO have you got a photo of this setup?
     
  14. CutOnce

    CutOnce Previous Member

    I've got to drop the boat down from the garage roof this week - I'll take a picture.

    --
    CutOnce
     

  15. Stumble
    Joined: Oct 2008
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    Location: New Orleans

    Stumble Senior Member

    Just to be clear, rope rigging is a great advance, and can save a lot of weight on money compared to wire or even rod rigging. I love the stuff, and plan on switching to it on the race boat, but there are some significant differences and issues.

    1) Kevlar, and most synthetic line is not acceptable replacements. Currently the only line that is sutable for replacing standing rigging is called Dynex Duc.

    2) Unlike wire it is not sized based upon MBL but instead on stretch resistance.

    3) UV concerns while valid are proving not to be a real concern. Expected current replacement life for the Dux is about 5 years, vs 6 for rod, and 8 for wire. But since the end fitting are easily reusable the first replacement is measured in hundreds of dollars (For an Olson 30) instead of thousands for rod.

    4) Professionaly splicing is recommened to remove constructional stretch before instalation, but is not required. I know people who replaced their entire standing rigging by themselves.

    5) Did I mention that currently only Dynex Duc is a reasonable replacement?
     
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