7m tri beams

Discussion in 'Multihulls' started by bushsailor, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. CTMD
    Joined: Dec 2007
    Posts: 198
    Likes: 9, Points: 0, Legacy Rep: 117
    Location: Melbourne, Aus

    CTMD Naval Architect

    Rather than fully machined moulds get soemone to cut out 2d templates which can be formed into a jig. Much cheaper.
     
  2. bushsailor
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 26
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Aus

    bushsailor Junior Member

    I am slowly doing some proper drawings of the boat but none are complete. They are all done by hand at present.
    Fore and aft bracing is done by vectran bracing diagonally under the nets.
    Beam float mount is by going through the float deck onto the side of the bulkhead underneath (in the hull). That way there are 2 stress points instead of one. (bulkhead and deck).
    Board is in centre hull. Rudders are in floats. We discovered that rudder in main hull lets go over about 18knots.
    Thanks for the advice Chris, it all helps.
     
  3. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,249
    Likes: 44, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    Beam layup

    Does anyone know the layup of 24' Grainger or Corsair beams? I have also wondered how much tension (if any) to pull the uni fiber layers while they are curing. I am used to working with glass and wood, but I am a novice at loaded beam construction. Thanks for any help, Bruce
     
  4. idkfa
    Joined: Sep 2005
    Posts: 329
    Likes: 6, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 79
    Location: Windward islands, Caribbean

    idkfa Senior Member

    What type of joint at the amas are you considering? Are you using bolts through the deck or some sort of interferance joint, where the crossbeam and ams plug into each other and the loads are passed through the material in contact and not the fasteners.

    Bit harder to fashion but may be worth it? If the crossbeams extend immovably out from the amas, they may handle the fore aft loads making your diagonal stays just added insurance.
     
  5. bushsailor
    Joined: Jan 2009
    Posts: 26
    Likes: 0, Points: 1, Legacy Rep: 10
    Location: Aus

    bushsailor Junior Member

    I agree, below is part of another post.
    Beam float mount is by going through the float deck onto the side of the bulkhead underneath (in the hull). That way there are 2 stress points instead of one. (bulkhead and deck).
    As per previous post why is the centreboard so far forward on many tri designs? Someone must have some ideas
     
  6. ThomD
    Joined: Mar 2009
    Posts: 551
    Likes: 20, Points: 18, Legacy Rep: 111
    Location: TO

    ThomD Senior Member

    Board position:

    I think there are two reasons, one is better upwind performance which is traditionally a Bugaboo with tris, even if well laid to rest. The other reason is the ama digs a hole as the wind blows, which counters weather helm, but possibly makes a forward position for the board better.

    On beams just plain beams without folding capacity, 4" Al with 1/8" and wires; 6" with 3/16" walls no wires, 6" square wood with 1" walls, no wires. With the wood you can fritz around with the wall thickenesses, and proportions of the tube to be a lot more efficient.
     

  7. bruceb
    Joined: Nov 2008
    Posts: 1,249
    Likes: 44, Points: 48, Legacy Rep: 214
    Location: atlanta,ga

    bruceb Senior Member

    board position

    I have a Buc 24 that I experimented some with board position last season. The top of the board is mostly cut away so it can "swing" fore and aft in the trunk. Center of area can be moved forward about 0.4 m from stock. My boat has a tall rig and shorter boom, so my sail center is slightly forward of stock, but the boat really liked the board in the forward position. Pointing improved by 1-2 degrees made good and the balance was better also. It does load the rudder more, but the control is better. (I have built a much longer rudder for this season) Both foils are lifting surfaces, it just forces the rudder to be a little larger and carry more of the load, which seems to help control on all points of sail. Most small tris and sport boats are carrying a lot of aft rake on their rig which seems to indicate that their boards are too far aft:?: . I might even try moving my mast back about 0.1-0.2m, I know at least one other modified buc 24 has tried it. Of course this is an old design, but the results probably are relevant for most tris. I am still following the beam design/construction thread- I hope some more experienced people post:) Bruce
     
Loading...
Forum posts represent the experience, opinion, and view of individual users. Boat Design Net does not necessarily endorse nor share the view of each individual post.
When making potentially dangerous or financial decisions, always employ and consult appropriate professionals. Your circumstances or experience may be different.