64 chriscraft constellation

Discussion in 'Wooden Boat Building and Restoration' started by Shiptoshore, Aug 5, 2013.

  1. Shiptoshore
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    Location: Old Hickory Tennessee

    Shiptoshore Capt Thompson

    Good evening everyone, I am and have been bringing a 57 foot constellation back to glory with a lot of labor and learning along the way. I have just finished replacing 18 planks on her starboard side and after getting home from the towboat this trip, I am pulling her to replace the transom, along with its framing to include 6x6 teak corner posts. This I have not done before but have managed to score the original build plans for the boat. I will be posting pics soon, as I just signed on this evening. I plan to fit the planks and use 3m 5200 in the seams as I have done on the starboard...I was curious as to whether anyone that has accomplished this feat might have any tips to share ....I will also be doing a bottom paint job as well while she's out....
    Chris
     
  2. djaus
    Joined: Jun 2013
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    djaus Salted Nut!

    Can't help with the build but would like to see some photo's.
     
  3. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    3M-5200 isn't the best choice for seams on this build method. 3M-5200 works well on nonporous surfaces, but if used under water, it needs to be under pressure during the full cure process (a couple of weeks). This works fine for thru hull fittings or other hard fastened items, but not well in seams, unless wedged or it's a double or triple plank, where hard fasteners are providing the pressure. I've repaired many over the years, where folks that swear by this system, have done this and the outcome is always the same. If not under pressure, the goo cures and it can be easily pulled out of the seam, with little effort, as a long, rubbery string like material, which isn't an ideal way to seal planking seams. 3M-101 or any polysulphide (two part is best) is the preferred man made product. This one of the few areas a modern material doesn't out perform the old school techniques and materials.
     
  4. Shiptoshore
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    Shiptoshore Capt Thompson

    Thank you for the advice, I am doing a bottom paint job as well but will use the recommended seam filler recommended by interlux...other than 3 m products what I the best think for the new transom planks? I will definitely post some picks when I can figure out how to upload pics( just signed up )
     
  5. PAR
    Joined: Nov 2003
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    Location: Eustis, FL

    PAR Yacht Designer/Builder

    Is this a composite build or a straight carvel? I've seen them done a few different ways, the most typical is batten seam above the waterline (5/4th's mahogany) and plank over plywood (4/4th's over various plywood thicknesses) below, but I've seen many variations of methods, some may have been "restorations" or "upgrades".
     
  6. Shiptoshore
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    Location: Old Hickory Tennessee

    Shiptoshore Capt Thompson

    It is batten seam then planked above waterline, then planked over plywood on bottom as you have stated
     
  7. Shiptoshore
    Joined: Aug 2013
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    Location: Old Hickory Tennessee

    Shiptoshore Capt Thompson

    How do I post some pics of the 64... I'm on a towboat and haven't had time to research it
     

  8. Boat Design Net Moderator
    Joined: Feb 2010
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    Boat Design Net Moderator Moderator

    Welcome to the forum Shiptoshore.
    To post photos, click Go Advanced or the blue Post Reply button, then click Manage Attachments and select the photo to upload and click upload. Then submit the post with the photo(s) attached.
     
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